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FREE Customized Personal Weight Loss Eating Plan! (Not Spam or MLM)

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  • MEGG4018MEGG4018 Posts: 12Member, Premium Member Posts: 12Member, Premium Member
    Hi! Sorry if it took me a while to get back to you I'm trying to figure my way around the app and taking many wrong turns. Thanks so much for your advice. Could I add you as a friend?
  • bitewing22bitewing22 Posts: 68Member Member Posts: 68Member Member
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 12,462Member Member Posts: 12,462Member Member
    MEGG4018 wrote: »
    Hi! Sorry if it took me a while to get back to you I'm trying to figure my way around the app and taking many wrong turns. Thanks so much for your advice. Could I add you as a friend?

    Generally **, if someone sends me a friend request, I accept it. I'm not very active on the MFP friend feed, so am maybe not all that satisfying an MFP friend, though. I'm more inclined to chat in the forums.

    ** It's nice to have a message with the friend request, but there have been I couple of requests I declined because the message (and a look at the person's profile feed) made me pretty certain they were "one of *those* guys" (a randy creeper), and li'l ol' lady don't need that. ;) That - inappropriate messages - is also the only reason I've ever deleted someone who was already an MFP friend, as far as I can recall.
  • Hungry_ShopgirlHungry_Shopgirl Posts: 329Member Member Posts: 329Member Member
  • thanos5thanos5 Posts: 509Member Member Posts: 509Member Member
    another bump because good stuff
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 3,489Member Member Posts: 3,489Member Member
    Glad someone did it!
  • awnurmarcawnurmarc Posts: 99Member Member Posts: 99Member Member
  • torimangiontorimangion Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
    AnnPT77, THANKYOU for your post, VERY much appreciated (bold words not shouted, just stressing x)....may you PLEASE be so kind as to elaborate on the following because I'm finding it hard to grasp unfortunately...

    "At least 0.6-0.8g protein per pound of healthy goal weight (approximately equivalent to 0.8-1g per pound of lean body mass). More is fine, within reason.
    - At least 0.35-0.45g fat per pound of healthy goal weight, as much of it as possible from healthy sources like olive oil, avocados, nuts, etc. More is fine, within reason."

    I mean you say max of 0.8g protein of healthy goal weight. Lets say I'm aiming to be 140lbs at my goal so to round it off lets say no more then 1g per lb - are you saying 140g of protein is allowed daily??? Or more specifically 140 x .6 = 84g to (140 x .8 =) 112g of protein?

    Thankyou for any help re this matter from anyone really who can answer this.

  • French_PeasantFrench_Peasant Posts: 1,631Member Member Posts: 1,631Member Member
    zobgoff wrote: »
    AnnPT77, THANKYOU for your post, VERY much appreciated (bold words not shouted, just stressing x)....may you PLEASE be so kind as to elaborate on the following because I'm finding it hard to grasp unfortunately...

    "At least 0.6-0.8g protein per pound of healthy goal weight (approximately equivalent to 0.8-1g per pound of lean body mass). More is fine, within reason.
    - At least 0.35-0.45g fat per pound of healthy goal weight, as much of it as possible from healthy sources like olive oil, avocados, nuts, etc. More is fine, within reason."

    I mean you say max of 0.8g protein of healthy goal weight. Lets say I'm aiming to be 140lbs at my goal so to round it off lets say no more then 1g per lb - are you saying 140g of protein is allowed daily??? Or more specifically 140 x .6 = 84g to (140 x .8 =) 112g of protein?

    Thankyou for any help re this matter from anyone really who can answer this.

    She is saying, if you aim for 140, get between 84g to 112g. 140g is overkill and likely unnecessary, but probably won't hurt if you like that much protein. (the .8 to 1 g applies to lean body mass, ie, without fat).
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 12,462Member Member Posts: 12,462Member Member
    zobgoff wrote: »
    AnnPT77, THANKYOU for your post, VERY much appreciated (bold words not shouted, just stressing x)....may you PLEASE be so kind as to elaborate on the following because I'm finding it hard to grasp unfortunately...

    "At least 0.6-0.8g protein per pound of healthy goal weight (approximately equivalent to 0.8-1g per pound of lean body mass). More is fine, within reason.
    - At least 0.35-0.45g fat per pound of healthy goal weight, as much of it as possible from healthy sources like olive oil, avocados, nuts, etc. More is fine, within reason."

    I mean you say max of 0.8g protein of healthy goal weight. Lets say I'm aiming to be 140lbs at my goal so to round it off lets say no more then 1g per lb - are you saying 140g of protein is allowed daily??? Or more specifically 140 x .6 = 84g to (140 x .8 =) 112g of protein?

    Thankyou for any help re this matter from anyone really who can answer this.

    She is saying, if you aim for 140, get between 84g to 112g. 140g is overkill and likely unnecessary, but probably won't hurt if you like that much protein. (the .8 to 1 g applies to lean body mass, ie, without fat).

    Exactly.

    Protein and fat are best thought of as minimums. More is fine, as long as it doesn't drive out other necessary nutrition.

    And you don't need to hit numbers exactly. A little over some days, a little under others - just fine. The calories determine weight loss. Nutrients are about health, satiety, body composition, energy level, and that sort of thing.

    I'd also underscore that the suggested amounts are just my opinion about what to target for best health maintenance odds while losing weight, and possibly also exercising. They're not unusual recommendations around here, but some people have different opinions.

    Best wishes!
  • donnainhoustondonnainhouston Posts: 1Member, Premium Member Posts: 1Member, Premium Member
    First, thanks for your original post. I do have a question of clarity -- it's pretty straight forward, but I just want ot be sure I understand.

    "At least 0.6-0.8g protein per pound of healthy goal weight...."

    By that statement simply multiplying the protein per pound by my desired "healthy goal weight", even if I'm 60 lbs above right now. I'm pretty sure the answer is yes, but I want to be certain. :smile:

    Thanks!
  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Posts: 25,730Member Member Posts: 25,730Member Member
    First, thanks for your original post. I do have a question of clarity -- it's pretty straight forward, but I just want ot be sure I understand.

    "At least 0.6-0.8g protein per pound of healthy goal weight...."

    By that statement simply multiplying the protein per pound by my desired "healthy goal weight", even if I'm 60 lbs above right now. I'm pretty sure the answer is yes, but I want to be certain. :smile:

    Thanks!

    Yes. It's actually 0.6 to 0.8 grams of protein per pound of lean body mass, but it's difficult to know what someone's lean body mass is (all the rest of your body minus fat). So it's easier to go with goal weight.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 12,462Member Member Posts: 12,462Member Member
    First, thanks for your original post. I do have a question of clarity -- it's pretty straight forward, but I just want ot be sure I understand.

    "At least 0.6-0.8g protein per pound of healthy goal weight...."

    By that statement simply multiplying the protein per pound by my desired "healthy goal weight", even if I'm 60 lbs above right now. I'm pretty sure the answer is yes, but I want to be certain. :smile:

    Thanks!

    Yes. It's actually 0.6 to 0.8 grams of protein per pound of lean body mass, but it's difficult to know what someone's lean body mass is (all the rest of your body minus fat). So it's easier to go with goal weight.

    FWIW, at the risk of making it more complicated, I'd say it's really (just my opinion! ;) ) 0.8-1g per pound of lean body mass, but 0.6-0.8g with an assumption cooked in that most people will have roughly around 20% body fat +/- at "healthy goal weight".

    Many people will actually have a few percent more or less body fat (BF) than that, but (1) the BF% difference doesn't really make a huge difference in the protein goal numbers if one does the arithmetic, and (2) most people whose goal weight/BF% is very unusual are slightly more likely to realize that (expecially those with a relatively low BF% goal who are focused on muscle mass/body comp . . . some of whom will choose a more aggressive protein goal than 1g per pound of LBM).

    But that's all just minor quibbles. :)

    Yes, @donnainhouston, bottom line is to just multiply your healthy goal weight by 0.6-08, and eat that number of protein grams daily as a minimum, is the advice I was suggesting. There's quite a range of opinions on the "proper" numbers, especially for protein.

    If you want more info, I think this article is informative, reasonably neutral, and science-based: https://examine.com/nutrition/how-much-protein-do-you-need/

    edited June 18
  • HappyFeetXOXOHappyFeetXOXO Posts: 13Member, Premium Member Posts: 13Member, Premium Member
    What percentages for daily macros do you suggest I enter?
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 12,462Member Member Posts: 12,462Member Member
    What percentages for daily macros do you suggest I enter?

    The MFP default percents are a decent start for most people.

    If you want to do something more customized, at some point after your calorie level is working well for you, it makes the most sense (to me) to start macro estimates by looking at your size, rather than at your calorie goal (percents do the latter). Exactly where to go from there is a matter of opinion (different experts say somewhat different things), so everything after this is just my opinion, based on sources I trust. (I am not personally a nutrition expert.)

    Start with your healthy goal weight (HGW). If you're not sure, use the middle of the BMI range for your height as an approximation. (A rough guess will work fine.)

    Multiply your HGW by 0.6, then multiply your HGW by 0.8. That will give a lower and upper value for the number of grams of protein I think it would be reasonable for you to eat daily. Tweak your MFP protein percent to put grams somewhere in that range.

    Now multiply your HGW by 0.35 and 0.45. That will give a lower and upper value for the number of grams of fats I think it would be reasonable for you to eat daily. Tweak your MFP fat percent to put grams somewhere in that range.

    Finally, tweak your MFP carb percent so the macronutrient percents add up to 100.

    Again, this is just my opinion. And macros really don't matter for weight loss, except in how they might affect your satiation, satisfaction, and energy level. If the above ideas screw up your satiation, satisfaction, or energy level to the point where it's annoyingly difficult for you to lose weight, do something different (within reason) that is more workable for you.

    Macros are for nutrition, energy level, and health. The first best thing you can do for your health is to lose weight. There's no value in making that more difficult than necessary! :)

    Finally, once you have your macros set somewhere, don't obsess about them. Close is good enough, day to day, especially if it's over some days, under others. Gradually working your way to where you want them, by gradually adjusting what you eat, is fine: It doesn't have to be instantly spot on. Keep the process manageable. Try to hit your protein (as a minimum) most days, but it's fine to go over. Fats are second to try to hit - again, OK to go over. Carbs can be anywhere, really, but if eating more of them spikes your appetite, then eat fewer of them. If eating too few of them tanks your energy level, then eat more of them.

    Some of this is personal: It can take a little experimenting to see where your satiation and energy level come out best. You don't have to get it exactly right on day one. You can take your time, and make gradual, manageable changes to what you eat. Humans are very adaptable omnivores. Assuming you're already generally healthy, not massively deficient in some nutrient (i.e., medically diagnosed as such), then improving your nutrition can be a slow, gradual process of improvement.

    Best wishes!

  • SueSueDioSueSueDio Posts: 4,796Member Member Posts: 4,796Member Member
    Always worth a bump!
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