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Should it just be as simple as increasing weight slightly every week?

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  • jm_1234jm_1234 Posts: 131Member Member Posts: 131Member Member
    RE: increasing weight slightly every week

    Increasing weight worked for me for a while. But I found my bones and ligaments couldn't keep up with the strength gains. I had to change other aspects (pace, reps, rest) in order to lessen the stress on non-muscles until they could strengthen.
  • sgt1372sgt1372 Posts: 3,383Member Member Posts: 3,383Member Member
    You will get stronger but not necessarily bigger doing a linear progression program.

    To get bigger, you'll need 2 eat more and lift even heavier (typically heavy wts/low reps) after you've plateaued doing linear progression. Lot of info on the Net about this.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 8,119Member Member Posts: 8,119Member Member
    Simply adding weight is a option if you are novel to training or you've been on hiatus for a extended period.

    I highly recommend training with more advanced training for a hypertrophy response than simply adding weight.

    You current lifts do not show the volume you are dosing during training assuming you are doing more the one set of five for a working set.

    It also is reasonable to think that you would lean heavily at a strength response and not hypertrophy as a goal of getting "bigger".



    edited January 27
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 8,119Member Member Posts: 8,119Member Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    Current lifts
    Squat 100x5
    Bench 70x5
    Deadlift 120x5
    You haven't said if these are in kgs or lbs?
    It makes zero difference if it's lbs or kgs.

  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 1,052Member Member Posts: 1,052Member Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    Current lifts
    Squat 100x5
    Bench 70x5
    Deadlift 120x5
    You haven't said if these are in kgs or lbs?
    It makes zero difference if it's lbs or kgs.

    At 57 kg bodyweight, a 70x5 lb bench is around untrained, while a 70x5 kg bench is into intermediate, and close to advanced. There is a ton of difference in programming between the two. Someone coming from untrained doesn't really need to be doing any bulking to make strength or even muscle gains.
  • wiigelecwiigelec Posts: 281Member Member Posts: 281Member Member
    Absolute weight on the bar is not overly indicative of training advancement, it’s more about appropriate stress application and recovery.

    A “beginner” could potentially lift more weight than an “intermediate” and the two could require vastly different programming to progress...
    edited January 27
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 1,052Member Member Posts: 1,052Member Member
    wiigelec wrote: »
    Absolute weight on the bar is not overly indicative of training advancement, it’s more about appropriate stress application and recovery.

    A “beginner” could potentially lift more weight than an “intermediate” and the two could require vastly different programming to progress...

    They could, but be serious about normal curves - they will describe most people. Saying they make zero difference - even in the case someone's an insanely strong beginner - towards programming is too absolute. There's also almost no chance someone is 70x5 in lb and not a beginner. If they actually have been training for a while and only at that level, there is something going on that no amount programming is going to account for.
  • wiigelecwiigelec Posts: 281Member Member Posts: 281Member Member
    There's also almost no chance someone is 70x5 in lb and not a beginner. If they actually have been training for a while and only at that level, there is something going on that no amount programming is going to account for.
    True ... unless they are 90 years old 😉...

  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 8,119Member Member Posts: 8,119Member Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    Current lifts
    Squat 100x5
    Bench 70x5
    Deadlift 120x5
    You haven't said if these are in kgs or lbs?
    It makes zero difference if it's lbs or kgs.

    At 57 kg bodyweight, a 70x5 lb bench is around untrained, while a 70x5 kg bench is into intermediate, and close to advanced. There is a ton of difference in programming between the two. Someone coming from untrained doesn't really need to be doing any bulking to make strength or even muscle gains.

    Nope. There isn't any established evidence who is beginner, intermediate, or advanced by whatever weight measurement one can perform.

    I've literally had people untrained who on their very first day squatted 50kg(110lbs) for reps of five and another who squatted 120kg(265lbs). Both were same height, gender, weight, etc...Both continued to progress at a reasonable rate for a untrained individual.

    Why would we label individuals differently just by a arbitrary number they can lift? The vast majority of untrained lifters will respond to the same amount of volume regardless of tonnage.

    As individuals we will have a wide range of starting points. I certainly wouldn't tell the individual who can squat 120kg for sets of five their first day that they are a intermediate lifter and linear progression will not work the same as for the lifters who lift much less.

    edited January 28
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