Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Starting again!

Paz922Paz922 Posts: 35Member Member Posts: 35Member Member
I am starting a new journey to lose 15 lbs by April 1st.

I’ve tried every diet out there without success! I’ve been loosing and gaining the same 15 lbs for 17 years. I am so tired from my emotional eating. I weigh 157 which I know for a lot of people it does not seem a lot but it is for me. I am a food addict and sugar triggers my binges. When I have even a little of sugar, I lose control completely! I have realized that drinking a glass or two of wine can also trigger my compulsion to overeat. Overeating is a symptom of something much deeper.

I hope I am successful this time around!

Replies

  • mermaidnjmermaidnj Posts: 44Member Member Posts: 44Member Member
    15 or115 is not the issue it is the way we use food to cope that becomes the problem ..good luck in finding your something deeper and conqureing those cravings...
  • Paz922Paz922 Posts: 35Member Member Posts: 35Member Member
    mermaidnj wrote: »
    15 or115 is not the issue it is the way we use food to cope that becomes the problem ..good luck in finding your something deeper and conqureing those cravings...

  • Paz922Paz922 Posts: 35Member Member Posts: 35Member Member
    I agree with you! Thank you!😊
  • ladyzherraladyzherra Posts: 319Member, Premium Member Posts: 319Member, Premium Member
    I agree. The amount of weight is not as important for us emotional eaters as conquering the emotional tie we have with food. The journey should be about understanding why we eat like we do, and implementing some strategies that actually work ( which I discover through trial and error) in order to gain a healthy lifestyle. What are your plans for this?
  • Paz922Paz922 Posts: 35Member Member Posts: 35Member Member
    ladyzherra wrote: »
    I agree. The amount of weight is not as important for us emotional eaters as conquering the emotional tie we have with food. The journey should be about understanding why we eat like we do, and implementing some strategies that actually work ( which I discover through trial and error) in order to gain a healthy lifestyle. What are your plans for this?


    I went to OA ten years ago for about two years. It helped at first but I started to eat more and gained weight. The issue with me is that it is hard to eliminate all trigger foods from my diet. I am now working with a great therapist that understand my issues. I am not over eating as much and I am happier with myself. I still have a lot work ahead of me to overcome my issues but I feel better about my journey.
  • ladyzherraladyzherra Posts: 319Member, Premium Member Posts: 319Member, Premium Member
    @Paz922 Thanks for your reply! I also went to OA but it does resonnate with me personally because it felt very rigid and almost religious in a sense, and it did not appeal to me, although I really loved connecting with many of the people who attended the meetings.

    I am happy to hear that you engaged a therapist. I also worked with one for a while and I gained some really useful tools. I find a lot of support in reading books about my issue, and recently discovered an overeater's workbook, which I hope to begin soon.

    The best tool that I have found is to be present during a binge -- mentally and emotionally. Often, I can stop a binge by just acknowledging that I am actually binging and being really present in the moment, like asking myself questions about why I am doing it, etc. That has been really functional for me!

    You can stay on this journey. You can do this.
  • Paz922Paz922 Posts: 35Member Member Posts: 35Member Member
    ladyzherra wrote: »
    @Paz922 Thanks for your reply! I also went to OA but it does resonnate with me personally because it felt very rigid and almost religious in a sense, and it did not appeal to me, although I really loved connecting with many of the people who attended the meetings.

    I am happy to hear that you engaged a therapist. I also worked with one for a while and I gained some really useful tools. I find a lot of support in reading books about my issue, and recently discovered an overeater's workbook, which I hope to begin soon.

    The best tool that I have found is to be present during a binge -- mentally and emotionally. Often, I can stop a binge by just acknowledging that I am actually binging and being really present in the moment, like asking myself questions about why I am doing it, etc. That has been really functional for me!

    You can stay on this journey. You can do this.

    Thank you for sharing your experience! I also believe OA was too extrict for me and that is the reason why I binged even more. Being present is so important. Would you please share with me the names of the books you’ve read. It would be great to read about my issue. Yes, we can do this!
  • ladyzherraladyzherra Posts: 319Member, Premium Member Posts: 319Member, Premium Member
    ladyzherra wrote: »
    @nyponbell Yes, I have some books that I really have found super helpful. One is When Food is Comfort by Julie Simon. I have read many books on overeating and food addiction, but this one is at the top of my list because it is REALLY useful. It provides actual steps that are achievable to accomplish day by day. It also provides understandable explanation about the mental and emotional component of this problem. I highly recommend this book.

    Another is the Food Addiction Recovery Workbook by Carolyn Coker Ross. This is a hands-on workbook that you can fill in; it also offers a lot of information about the disease/obsession. I like it a lot because it helps me to dig deeper into understanding my own unique relationship to sabotage and food.

    I liked Food: The Good Girl's Drug by Sunny Sea Gold, which reads more like an autobiography. What I liked about this book was that her story made seeing MY OWN story easier. She is a great writer, and really made me feel hopeful about reaching my goals.

    Finally, I really like Shades of Hope: How to Treat your Addiction to Food by Tennie McCarty. It includes stories from other addicts, and I just feel like I am supported in a community when I learn that I am not alone.

    Those are my "best of" books.

    I would warn, I read one book that I really did not like. I fact, this book seemed quite harmful for me. It is called Never Binge Again by Glenn Livingston. As I read this book, I felt quite terrible about myself and found that the strategy was actually harmful and self-destructive. I would warn most people against investing much in this text. It should be taken off the shelves, in my humble opinion.

    @paz922 This is what I just replied in the "Satotage" thread in this forum earlier today when someone else asked me this same question. I hope it helps!
  • Paz922Paz922 Posts: 35Member Member Posts: 35Member Member
    ladyzherra wrote: »
    ladyzherra wrote: »
    @nyponbell Yes, I have some books that I really have found super helpful. One is When Food is Comfort by Julie Simon. I have read many books on overeating and food addiction, but this one is at the top of my list because it is REALLY useful. It provides actual steps that are achievable to accomplish day by day. It also provides understandable explanation about the mental and emotional component of this problem. I highly recommend this book.

    Another is the Food Addiction Recovery Workbook by Carolyn Coker Ross. This is a hands-on workbook that you can fill in; it also offers a lot of information about the disease/obsession. I like it a lot because it helps me to dig deeper into understanding my own unique relationship to sabotage and food.

    I liked Food: The Good Girl's Drug by Sunny Sea Gold, which reads more like an autobiography. What I liked about this book was that her story made seeing MY OWN story easier. She is a great writer, and really made me feel hopeful about reaching my goals.

    Finally, I really like Shades of Hope: How to Treat your Addiction to Food by Tennie McCarty. It includes stories from other addicts, and I just feel like I am supported in a community when I learn that I am not alone.

    Those are my "best of" books.

    I would warn, I read one book that I really did not like. I fact, this book seemed quite harmful for me. It is called Never Binge Again by Glenn Livingston. As I read this book, I felt quite terrible about myself and found that the strategy was actually harmful and self-destructive. I would warn most people against investing much in this text. It should be taken off the shelves, in my humble opinion.

    @paz922 This is what I just replied in the "Satotage" thread in this forum earlier today when someone else asked me this same question. I hope it helps!

    Thank you so much for taking the time to share the books that helped you! I really appreciate it!😊
  • kristinaouellettefitkristinaouellettefit Posts: 7Member Member Posts: 7Member Member
    It can definitely be easy to fall out of control but one of the best first steps you can take is getting control of the desire to restrict! It's so important to remind yourself that you CAN eat anything you want. It's a hard change to make but it can be incredibly impactful! If you take it slow, you can do it but you have to give yourself grace and be willing to have moments of weakness!
    I hope this is ok to say but it's something I battled for 25 years and now I share tips and tricks daily on my instagram account, if you'd like to connect there :)@kristinaouellettefit
  • debrabuf1debrabuf1 Posts: 5Member, Premium Member Posts: 5Member, Premium Member
    I find for me that when I eat fast, especially dinner I keep eating..then when I'm done it is oh crap did it again. I'm trying to work on the 20, 20, 20 eating that might help break this nasty habit of mine, or at least help me to enjoy my food instead of devouring it only to be left feeling I need more in my mouth.
Sign In or Register to comment.