Weight preference?

Ok, body builders/powerlifters..

I want to ask you guys what’s an impressive weight for my height/weight.

I’m building up my deadlifts (I just started), and squats.

I have a pr for squats at 165.
Deadlifts weak right now at 125.

I’m 166cm, 58kg.
Muscle mass 36%

I feel I could push more, but should I just push for hypertrophy at lower weights, or just max out with one rep tries?

I’ve noticed using a lifting belt has helped my with squats tremendously. How long do you rest each set?

Thanks.

Replies

  • imxnianne
    imxnianne Posts: 216 Member
    edited June 2020
    Thank you for the informative reply! It helps me understand it more.

    I think I’ll do a bit more research for it. The resting period seems a bit long, maybe that should be something I need to work on.
  • pondee629
    pondee629 Posts: 2,487 Member
    " what’s an impressive weight for my height/weight."? Better than yesterday, not as good as tomorrow.
  • quiksylver296
    quiksylver296 Posts: 28,073 Member
    @chieflrg nailed it. I'll leave now.
  • DancingMoosie
    DancingMoosie Posts: 8,069 Member
    Are you measuring the lifts in lbs or kg?
  • JBanx256
    JBanx256 Posts: 903 Member
    edited June 2020
    Not sure where "preference" comes into play here? Anyway...as far as what would be considered "impressive" lifts, I'm attaching a screenshot of USPA classification standards (for males, obviously for females those numbers will be different), and these are in pounds instead of kg of course but it's a good reference IMO

    sp29e715wz48.png
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,082 Member
    edited June 2020
    JBanx256 wrote: »
    Not sure where "preference" comes into play here? Anyway...as far as what would be considered "impressive" lifts, I'm attaching a screenshot of USPA classification standards (for males, obviously for females those numbers will be different), and these are in pounds instead of kg of course but it's a good reference IMO

    sp29e715wz48.png

    There are several grave errors to using a chart like this for comparing how impressive our gym training might be.

    1. This is calculated from competitive meets and unfamiliar 1RM displays. In most cases this will mean a huge difference in "gym"1RM compared to a "meet"1RM. Gym variety usually always involves a cumulative build up stress compared to a taper of stress to prepare for a meet which allows for much different data. Mine personally is a 15% difference between preparing for a meet or not in the way I train/prepare.
    2. I'm not sure if this chart reflect "tested" or "untested" lifters" or accumulation of both. I believe they run both in this fed as I recall I could hold world records in the untested class which doesn't really mean I'm strongest in the world because of variables. So we can see how error just by competing in a different feds can make this chart obsolete for usefulness for a competitive powerlifter and even greater for a general lifter who doesn't compete at all.
    3. These lifters might be squatting with knee wraps opposed to bare knees of most general people might train in. "RAW" means different variables in different feds.

    Lets look at lifter A and lifter B to get a bigger picture of why I'm not a fan of these charts for general public.

    Lifter A: Has trained for 9 months, squats without knee sleeves, no belt for any lifts, runs 5Ks on average 4-6 X per year, trains without any enhancement help and deadlifts with a stiff bar and at best has average response to training.

    Lifter B: Has trained for 18 years, squat with knee wraps, belt, does zero cardio, and is running cycles of gear, has a freak level of response to training. Loves pulling with a deadlift bar and has named his "Sweet Suzy".

    It's hardly fair or helpful to even try to compare the examples of these two lifters.

    I would go as far as to say it's creating a nocebo and harmful to any lifter's training to compare themselves to a chart that isn't specific to their way of training or measuring "strength".

    No offense, but someone else's numbers are absolutely irrelevant to any measurement of "impressiveness" of a individual who doesn't have the same variables related to the chart. Even if they did have the same variables, it wouldn't hold much water to how impressive their lifts are since we are all humans and not robots that perform precisely the same as another one with the same attributes.