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Reducing the next day soreness

AucturitasJonesAucturitasJones Member Posts: 5 Member Member Posts: 5 Member
What do you do to reduce the soreness the next day after heavy lifting? Stretching? Yoga? What helps you?

Replies

  • pridesabtchpridesabtch Member Posts: 791 Member Member Posts: 791 Member
    I make sure I drink enough and eat enough before and after the workout. I warm up with 10-15 minutes on the elliptical before I lift & cool down on an exercise bike for 10-15 minutes after I lift. Remember cool down is low intensity. Then I throw in some moderate cardio the next day to get the blood pumping through the sore muscles...

    Good luck.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,618 Member Member Posts: 8,618 Member
    1. Go about the day normally.
    2. If it's ridiculous, I would perform whatever lift/movement or close to with much less load. So lets say you squatted with barbell, air squats would be appropriate.
    3. Understand that soreness is part of the game. If we are talking DOMS...then know it was only because the movement was novel and won't happen every time.
  • DancingMoosieDancingMoosie Member Posts: 5,961 Member Member Posts: 5,961 Member
    Stretch and walk. Take ibuprofen if needed. Movements with less load, just so you don't tighten up.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,618 Member Member Posts: 8,618 Member
    watts6151 wrote: »
    Stretch and walk. Take ibuprofen if needed. Movements with less load, just so you don't tighten up.

    Personally I’d avoid the NSAIDs

    Agreed. There are certain conditions such as autoimmune disease the pros>cons even that is debatable but they should be avoided.

    If we use NSAIDS and resistance train, they literally can block the useful stress that drives progress.
    edited September 10
  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Member Posts: 27,127 Member Member Posts: 27,127 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    watts6151 wrote: »
    Stretch and walk. Take ibuprofen if needed. Movements with less load, just so you don't tighten up.

    Personally I’d avoid the NSAIDs

    Agreed. There are certain conditions such as autoimmune disease the pros>cons even that is debatable but they should be avoided.

    If we use NSAIDS and resistance train, they literally can block the useful stress that drives progress.

    Crap. I take ibuprofen all the time for headaches. What should I take instead, @chieflrg?
  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 325 Member Member Posts: 325 Member
    don’t like foam rolling eh

    well to each their own helps me immensely
    edited September 10
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,618 Member Member Posts: 8,618 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    watts6151 wrote: »
    Stretch and walk. Take ibuprofen if needed. Movements with less load, just so you don't tighten up.

    Personally I’d avoid the NSAIDs

    Agreed. There are certain conditions such as autoimmune disease the pros>cons even that is debatable but they should be avoided.

    If we use NSAIDS and resistance train, they literally can block the useful stress that drives progress.

    Crap. I take ibuprofen all the time for headaches. What should I take instead, @chieflrg?

    For short term Acetaminophen, such as Tylenol is often recommended, a reasonable alternative to NSAIDs.

    If you have long term problems, I would discuss with your doctor.

    NSAIDS such as Advil can causes ulcers and bleeding in the s to.ach or intestines. Not to fear monger, but I know of a person who died from complications of this.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 38,122 Member Member Posts: 38,122 Member
    What do you do to reduce the soreness the next day after heavy lifting? Stretching? Yoga? What helps you?

    Mostly just moving...going for a walk or a ride. I assume you're fairly new to lifting or restarting...DOMs is temporary and should for the most part diminish substantially after a couple of weeks.
  • watts6151watts6151 Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    watts6151 wrote: »
    Stretch and walk. Take ibuprofen if needed. Movements with less load, just so you don't tighten up.

    Personally I’d avoid the NSAIDs

    Agreed. There are certain conditions such as autoimmune disease the pros>cons even that is debatable but they should be avoided.

    If we use NSAIDS and resistance train, they literally can block the useful stress that drives progress.

    Crap. I take ibuprofen all the time for headaches. What should I take instead, @chieflrg?

    For short term Acetaminophen, such as Tylenol is often recommended, a reasonable alternative to NSAIDs.

    If you have long term problems, I would discuss with your doctor.

    NSAIDS such as Advil can causes ulcers and bleeding in the s to.ach or intestines. Not to fear monger, but I know of a person who died from complications of this.

    Had a good customer who started with stomach ulcers from naproxen, the dr’s ended putting him on dialysis because it boxed his kidneys ffs
    edited September 10
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,618 Member Member Posts: 8,618 Member
    watts6151 wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    watts6151 wrote: »
    Stretch and walk. Take ibuprofen if needed. Movements with less load, just so you don't tighten up.

    Personally I’d avoid the NSAIDs

    Agreed. There are certain conditions such as autoimmune disease the pros>cons even that is debatable but they should be avoided.

    If we use NSAIDS and resistance train, they literally can block the useful stress that drives progress.

    Crap. I take ibuprofen all the time for headaches. What should I take instead, @chieflrg?

    For short term Acetaminophen, such as Tylenol is often recommended, a reasonable alternative to NSAIDs.

    If you have long term problems, I would discuss with your doctor.

    NSAIDS such as Advil can causes ulcers and bleeding in the s to.ach or intestines. Not to fear monger, but I know of a person who died from complications of this.

    Had a good customer who started with stomach ulcers from naproxen, the dr’s ended putting him on dialysis because it boxed his kidneys ffs

    Woah no.

    When my kidneys showed red flags of failure doctors stsrt3d blaming each other.

    Radiation, chemo, RA, creatine usage. Doctors hopefully use current evidence and history, but sometimes egos get in the way.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 1,958 Member Member Posts: 1,958 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    watts6151 wrote: »
    Stretch and walk. Take ibuprofen if needed. Movements with less load, just so you don't tighten up.

    Personally I’d avoid the NSAIDs

    Agreed. There are certain conditions such as autoimmune disease the pros>cons even that is debatable but they should be avoided.

    If we use NSAIDS and resistance train, they literally can block the useful stress that drives progress.

    Crap. I take ibuprofen all the time for headaches. What should I take instead, @chieflrg?

    For short term Acetaminophen, such as Tylenol is often recommended, a reasonable alternative to NSAIDs.

    If you have long term problems, I would discuss with your doctor.

    NSAIDS such as Advil can causes ulcers and bleeding in the s to.ach or intestines. Not to fear monger, but I know of a person who died from complications of this.

    Out of curiosity, do you know if Tart Cherry, CBD Oil or some of the other more natural pain relievers (PEA, for instance) have the same ability to block gains.

    I know in the cardio world a few years ago, Vit E and Vit C combined, were all the rage because they found they protected your lungs from inflammation. But that same protection stunted gains in training, so triathletes (and marathoners) started taking them only after a race, but not during training.

    You mentioned Ibuprofen as possibly stunting progress.

    I also find a difference when I eat to recover within an hour and also take electrolyte supplements. D-Ribose is great for some as well. Ironically, better known in the Fibromyalgia world than the weight lifting world.
    edited September 10
  • ritzvinritzvin Member, Premium Posts: 2,754 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,754 Member
    What do you do to reduce the soreness the next day after heavy lifting? Stretching? Yoga? What helps you?

    Is lifting new for you? (DOMS from hell is pretty normal when starting a new activity, or resuming after a long absence). If that's the case, expect that it won't be like this after the first few sessions.

    Dealing with that myself right now - 1st gym session in ~6 months was 2 days ago (I gave them 1-2 weeks to work the bugs out of their new procedures after re-opening before heading back)(New York State).
  • sakurablossoms82sakurablossoms82 Member Posts: 41 Member Member Posts: 41 Member
    Doing a good warming up and cool down helps me a lot. Since I do those I have less soreness afterwards. When I just started working out I thought those where a waste of time most of the time.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,618 Member Member Posts: 8,618 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    watts6151 wrote: »
    Stretch and walk. Take ibuprofen if needed. Movements with less load, just so you don't tighten up.

    Personally I’d avoid the NSAIDs

    Agreed. There are certain conditions such as autoimmune disease the pros>cons even that is debatable but they should be avoided.

    If we use NSAIDS and resistance train, they literally can block the useful stress that drives progress.

    Crap. I take ibuprofen all the time for headaches. What should I take instead, @chieflrg?

    For short term Acetaminophen, such as Tylenol is often recommended, a reasonable alternative to NSAIDs.

    If you have long term problems, I would discuss with your doctor.

    NSAIDS such as Advil can causes ulcers and bleeding in the s to.ach or intestines. Not to fear monger, but I know of a person who died from complications of this.

    Out of curiosity, do you know if Tart Cherry, CBD Oil or some of the other more natural pain relievers (PEA, for instance) have the same ability to block gains.

    I know in the cardio world a few years ago, Vit E and Vit C combined, were all the rage because they found they protected your lungs from inflammation. But that same protection stunted gains in training, so triathletes (and marathoners) started taking them only after a race, but not during training.

    You mentioned Ibuprofen as possibly stunting progress.

    I also find a difference when I eat to recover within an hour and also take electrolyte supplements. D-Ribose is great for some as well. Ironically, better known in the Fibromyalgia world than the weight lifting world.

    I've read a while back some limited evidence suggesting that Tart Cherry can help with endurance athletes. I haven't searched or read any meta analysis on pain relieve.

    CBD oil is absolute BS. The people pushing are only preying on people and trying to make a buck. They are harming the fitness community by making false claims and I can't stress enough how this is a scam.

    NDAIDS absolutely block inflammation which is part of resistance training progress under appropriate conditions. Inflammation is not a bad thing, and useful.

    I myself take and endorse the consumption of electrolytes during and after training.

    I'm happy to hear you are training through Fibro. Resistance training is very useful and proven to combat chronic pain including that from Fibro.

    ***EDITED TO ADD META ANALYSIS
    I have heard years ago about possible anti-inflammatory reactions with Tart Cherry. Never read anything though it interests me personally. I will post this to remind me to review.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5872786/

    Here is one on possible endurance benefits.

    https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-meta-analysis-tart-cherry-juice-concentrate-found-to-help-improve-endurance-exercise-performance-among-participants-in-10-studies-301006693.html
    edited September 11
  • zebasschickzebasschick Member Posts: 355 Member Member Posts: 355 Member
    i embrace my soreness - it means i had a serious workout that is going to help me build toward my goal. cool downs can help, but if you do enough intense lifting, is it a problem to have some soreness?
  • IronIsMyTherapyIronIsMyTherapy Member Posts: 293 Member Member Posts: 293 Member
    Sodium, magnesium and water.
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