Vegans Reaching Protein Goals

CookieRehab
CookieRehab Posts: 85 Member
Vegans who reach their protein goals; how do you do it? What do you eat, on avg, during a typical day? About how much protein are you eating daily? Any tips?

I very rarely reach my protein goal :(. I would like to be able to consistently reach it and maybe even be able to raise it. I am vegan. I am also allergic to soy so I do not eat much processed foods.

Please and thank you!

Replies

  • stpsd
    stpsd Posts: 4 Member
    If you can afford it, buy protein powder. I start my day off with protein powder because otherwise, I'm hungry all day. And if you find a good sale, you can buy it for about $1.50/serving. I stock up when I find it 30 percent off. You will find blends that are soy free. I'm also learning to make seitan from scratch (though so far it's been rubbery and awful, so I'm working on a good recipe) to augment my non-soy Asian dishes. And I eat beans/pulses at least once a day.
  • saltysparkle
    saltysparkle Posts: 149 Member
    I am also trying to figure this out. I want to up my workouts, but I think I really need more protein to do it, and I don't want to rely on animal products. My limitation is not soy (thought I do try to limit that to no more than 2-3 servings a week), but to cashews. Everyone is always touting cashew butter as the thing to add or make sauces with, and I'm allergic.

  • jquedal
    jquedal Posts: 19 Member
    I might get totally slammed for this, but science has shown that some of the healthiest, longest living populations on earth eat around 15% protein, no matter the source of the protein. We don't need any more than that, and too much can cause health problems for many people. That said, you can get plenty of protein on a vegan or plant based diet, through legumes, peas, quinoa, oats, broccoli, nuts and seeds, etc. Google plant based protein and you should find plenty of options. I avoid soy as well 99% of the time.
  • truebluecanadian
    truebluecanadian Posts: 6 Member
    edited October 2020

    I buy pea protein powder from the bulk food store. It is cheaper and cleaner then store bought. It is a quick easy breakfast. I add avocado and almond milt with a bit of cinnamon and frozen fruit.
  • truebluecanadian
    truebluecanadian Posts: 6 Member
    jquedal wrote: »
    I might get totally slammed for this, but science has shown that some of the healthiest, longest living populations on earth eat around 15% protein, no matter the source of the protein. We don't need any more than that, and too much can cause health problems for many people. That said, you can get plenty of protein on a vegan or plant based diet, through legumes, peas, quinoa, oats, broccoli, nuts and seeds, etc. Google plant based protein and you should find plenty of options. I avoid soy as well 99% of the time.

    You are 100% right on this. People eat far too mush protein and it cause cause heath issues. My dietitian showed that the amount of protein that we should be eating per day NOT per meal is about the size of the palm of your hand.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    jquedal wrote: »
    I might get totally slammed for this, but science has shown that some of the healthiest, longest living populations on earth eat around 15% protein, no matter the source of the protein. We don't need any more than that, and too much can cause health problems for many people. That said, you can get plenty of protein on a vegan or plant based diet, through legumes, peas, quinoa, oats, broccoli, nuts and seeds, etc. Google plant based protein and you should find plenty of options. I avoid soy as well 99% of the time.

    You are 100% right on this. People eat far too mush protein and it cause cause heath issues. My dietitian showed that the amount of protein that we should be eating per day NOT per meal is about the size of the palm of your hand.

    I wouldn't feel very good if I limited my daily protein to the size of my hand. Given that different plant foods have different amounts of protein per volume, I'm not even sure how this is backed by any evidence. My "palm" in beans and my "palm" in seitan is very different in terms of protein, right?
  • LenGray
    LenGray Posts: 705 Member
    I usually hit 65-80 grams of protein a day. Generally, I do this one of two ways, either by eating protein-heavy items (tofu, tempeh, mock meats, protein powder) in my meals or by getting it in increments (nuts, seeds, broccoli, peas, beans) in meals and snacks.

    I think the main thing that I do is just fiddle with my diary until I'm happy with my protein levels and my meals. Sometimes I have to change stuff around, but I think that's pretty common with any diet. For example, today I switched a carb-heavy, low-protein curry for a bean-based soup with a kale salad that had less calories, more volume, and higher protein.
  • rhauser44
    rhauser44 Posts: 49 Member
    jquedal wrote: »
    I might get totally slammed for this, but science has shown that some of the healthiest, longest living populations on earth eat around 15% protein, no matter the source of the protein. We don't need any more than that, and too much can cause health problems for many people. That said, you can get plenty of protein on a vegan or plant based diet, through legumes, peas, quinoa, oats, broccoli, nuts and seeds, etc. Google plant based protein and you should find plenty of options. I avoid soy as well 99% of the time.

    So, as a general rule, what would this work out according to g/Kg of body weight? There are some citations online, from clinical research, that suggest .8-1.2 grams / Kg of body-weight for people > 65. So in my case, a 63 year-old male, that works out to 66-98 grams / day.

    I'm interested in moving more to a plant-based diet, and hitting my protein macros with plant sources, without relying on powders and cheeses.
  • durhammfp
    durhammfp Posts: 496 Member
    jquedal wrote: »
    science has shown that some of the healthiest, longest living populations on earth eat around 15% protein, no matter the source of the protein.

    Could you link to some of those studies? Thanks!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,217 Member
    rhauser44 wrote: »
    jquedal wrote: »
    I might get totally slammed for this, but science has shown that some of the healthiest, longest living populations on earth eat around 15% protein, no matter the source of the protein. We don't need any more than that, and too much can cause health problems for many people. That said, you can get plenty of protein on a vegan or plant based diet, through legumes, peas, quinoa, oats, broccoli, nuts and seeds, etc. Google plant based protein and you should find plenty of options. I avoid soy as well 99% of the time.

    So, as a general rule, what would this work out according to g/Kg of body weight? There are some citations online, from clinical research, that suggest .8-1.2 grams / Kg of body-weight for people > 65. So in my case, a 63 year-old male, that works out to 66-98 grams / day.

    I'm interested in moving more to a plant-based diet, and hitting my protein macros with plant sources, without relying on powders and cheeses.

    FWIW, I'm targeting 100g minimum daily as a vegetarian (not vegan), which is about .8g/pound (yes, pound) of my current weight - translates to about 1.75g/kg. I'm age 65, F, quite active. Personally, I think it's a good bet-hedge to aim a little high when getting lots of protein from less EAA-complete plant sources, when active, when losing weight, when aging . . . and I fit all of those (though the "losing" one is just an ultra-slow few pounds of vanity weight right now).

    Personally, I don't see any reason to believe my nutritional needs are any different because of being a vegetarian vs. an omnivore; what's different is how I fulfill those needs.

    I admit I eat a good bit of dairy, but think I could hit my current levels fully plant-based, though it would take more attention and effort, realistically. I don't eat protein powder/bars normally, nor most faux meats. I don't think there's anything wrong with those, I just don't find them tasty or satisfying, personally, so I've worked at not needing them. I do eat diverse soy foods, and if I were striving to be fully plant-based, I'd need to eat more of them, plus probably more frequent seitan, a thing I think is OK-ish, but not my favorite.

    I'm also not opposed to processed foods (probably obvious from the fact I think faux meat and protein powder are OK 😆). Lately, in the realm of more processed foods, I've been finding various legume pastas (especially chickpea and edamame ones) helpful. At reduced calories, peanut butter or almond butter powder is good (not as a spread, for me, but as an ingredient), and I often include nutritional yeast as an ingredient. Those last are little things, but the little bits do add up. Legumes (including soy) are really key, for me, whole or processed.
  • IJP2019
    IJP2019 Posts: 37 Member
    To hit protein, fat, fiber, carbs spot on, it takes planning and if that planning doesn’t work out....then protein powder.

    Seitan is great to hit protein goals, of course tofu, tempeh, soy curls and tvp! To get to the top end of my protein goals for muscle gain and maintaining, protein powder all the way. It really is the easiest way to get high protein with low calories.

    I average 130g of protein and 1500-1700 cals (I am currently cutting weight)

    It took dedication to change the way that I ate to get there though. There is a lot vegan junk food on the market!

    An average day when cutting can be the following:
    Breakfast
    Oatmeal 3/4 cup (no sugar)
    Sugar-free soy milk
    Protein shake (with water or unsweetened almond)

    Lunch
    Homemade chicken seitan
    Broccoli
    Siracha

    Snack
    Protein shake (with water or unsweetened almond milk)

    Dinner
    Vegan butter chik’n (home made with soy curls)
    Wild rice
    Big Garden salad with home made balsamic vinegar and mustard dressing
    Or
    Thai curry with with lentils and roasted extra firm tofu chunks
    Wild rice
    Big Garden salad with home made balsamic vinegar and mustard dressing

    There are meal plans out there for a variety of dinner ideas ....one that I like is Clean food dirty girl....I just cut out most of the bread, dessert type of inclusions, add a high protein source like seitan or tofu and eat the rest.