true farm fresh eggs, no suffering

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Kenazwa
Kenazwa Posts: 278 Member
In the spring and summer, we have a source of true farm-fresh eggs where the chickens have a lot of space outside and get good care. The flock lays way too many eggs to hatch them all.

Is there a compelling reason not to eat them?
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Replies

  • vegan4lyfe2012
    vegan4lyfe2012 Posts: 1,141 Member
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  • brevislux
    brevislux Posts: 1,093 Member
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    When I'm told of free-range, my first question is where all the roosters are. If there aren't any, then where are they and what happened to them? Odds are, they buy their chicks from factories where the males are culled. So if you buy the eggs, you're paying people to kill the chicks.
    Otherwise, I wouldn't know treatment really is good. When you make animals' bodies a business and sell their eggs and their milk, economic concerns are almost a little more important than their welfare. I would not "count" on anybody who does this for a living to truly take good care of the animals.
  • Kenazwa
    Kenazwa Posts: 278 Member
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    This isn't anybody trying to make a living. It's a friend of a friend with a small backyard flock of chickens because she really enjoys chickens. There is a rooster, and some eggs are allowed to hatch. They have a house for roosting at night and are free in the large yard by day.

    I'm not trying to justify eating them. It's just that I'm so new to a plant-based diet and vegan philosophy that I wonder what others think.
  • danikanoodles
    danikanoodles Posts: 150 Member
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  • brevislux
    brevislux Posts: 1,093 Member
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    I believe you know the people and the conditions better than anyone to reply here, and you can trust your own judgement on this. If you feel it's not hurting anyone, and there's no reason why not to take some eggs - then go ahead. I thought you were talking about a "free-range" farm.
  • wild_wild_life
    wild_wild_life Posts: 1,334 Member
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    Personally I would eat them if I believed the chickens were happy, especially if they would go to waste otherwise. I agree with the poster above that you have to use your own discernment. People have all sorts of opinions, including those who don't believe animals should be kept in captivity or that any part of an animal should be used in any way -- personally I think we have to trust ourselves to draw our own line.

    When you say that some eggs are allowed to hatch, does this mean the eggs are fertilized? Usually the eggs we eat are not fertilized, although I admit I'm not sure how backyard chicken-owners do it. It could be a bit unsettling to find an embryo in your breakfast.

    Interesting question, thanks for posting!
  • wild_wild_life
    wild_wild_life Posts: 1,334 Member
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    It's not really equivalent...chickens don't slough their uterine lining when they release the egg.
  • VeganMotoGirl
    VeganMotoGirl Posts: 43 Member
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    I too have thought about this topic. I am new to the vegetarian and still consider myself transitioning. My ultimate goal is to go totally vegan by the end of this year. But I live in a household with a meat eater and I still end up preparing his meals with meat and eggs and dairy. I do buy him eggs from a local free range farmer. On several occasions in this transition I have given in and had some eggs with him and justify to myself that they are from happy free range chickens. Though I always feel guilty afterward and I will swear off eggs again. It's a though place to be when you are still trying to figure out where you stand. I am not sure where I stand on backyard 'almost pet' chicken eggs. It seems a lot better than the farms.
  • Kenazwa
    Kenazwa Posts: 278 Member
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    Personally I would eat them if I believed the chickens were happy, especially if they would go to waste otherwise. I agree with the poster above that you have to use your own discernment. People have all sorts of opinions, including those who don't believe animals should be kept in captivity or that any part of an animal should be used in any way -- personally I think we have to trust ourselves to draw our own line.

    When you say that some eggs are allowed to hatch, does this mean the eggs are fertilized? Usually the eggs we eat are not fertilized, although I admit I'm not sure how backyard chicken-owners do it. It could be a bit unsettling to find an embryo in your breakfast.

    Interesting question, thanks for posting!

    I guess a good percentage of them are probably fertilized, never thought about that really. I think there are only certain hens that she allows to brood, all other eggs she gathers on a daily basis so they don't get to the embryo stage of development.

    I'm still transitioning. Vegetarian is easier for me to achieve than full vegan, but I think my doctor is right about the potential health benefits for me so that's what I'm going for.
  • RaeLB
    RaeLB Posts: 1,216 Member
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    When I'm told of free-range, my first question is where all the roosters are. If there aren't any, then where are they and what happened to them? Odds are, they buy their chicks from factories where the males are culled. So if you buy the eggs, you're paying people to kill the chicks.

    This ^

    Personally, animal welfare isn't enough for me. I do not believe we have the right to own other beings and exploit their labour for our own purposes. Unless farm animals have been rescued and are living in a sanctuary, they shouldn't be captive.

    "Free-range" farming is such a seductive idea for many people but there are so many ethical problems involved... even for people just concerned with welfare rather than the end of captivity. As stated above hens are usually sourced from the same hatcheries that supply factory farming so it still supports factory farming. These hatcheries put the male chicks through grinders while still alive or gas them.
  • Wade406
    Wade406 Posts: 272 Member
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    I eat a vegan diet for health reasons. For me, it's the saturated fat and cholesterol in eggs that prevent me from eating them. Eggs are not safe or healthy. Search eggs on nutritionfacts.org.
  • mazmataz
    mazmataz Posts: 331 Member
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    I do not believe we have the right to own other beings and exploit their labour for our own purposes.

    So how would you feel about horseback riding? I'm genuinely curious. I'm new to the vegan community and I am also a horse lover, owned horses all of my life (with the exception of the past few years). I'm just wondering where the issue stands within the community. I can say that my horse - who I sadly had to leave in the care of a friend whilst I traveled - was definitely not overworked lol! Fat, hairy, spoiled and with all year access to a very large field and shelter (shared with his mates) with the occassional ride around our village pretty much summed up his lifestyle. I believe that if people did not keep horses recreationally, then there would be less opposition to using horses for meat.

    As for the egg thing - I don't see anything wrong with using eggs from privately owned chickens who are kept as pets rather than to produce for profit.

    P.S. Just to be clear, my horse wasn't fat through any form of neglect or wrong feeding. He is a Welsh Cob, they're supposed to get a little rounded in the tummy in preperation for the poor grass in winter.
  • escarmalanes
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    By definition a vegan does not consume, USE or eat any animals or animal products.
  • wild_wild_life
    wild_wild_life Posts: 1,334 Member
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    By definition a vegan does not consume, USE or eat any animals or animal products.

    Can a vegan use animals for companionship?
  • mteague277
    mteague277 Posts: 145 Member
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    OK so what if someone rescues the chickens (there are some currently in the shelter by my house just sitting in cages :/) and they lay the eggs? What then? use them for compost? toss them out?

    I am vegan for both health and moral reasons, so I am conflicted. I want to go rescue those chickens, I have the space! But I hate hate wasting things, should I just compost the eggs (I compost everything and grow all of my own fruits and veggies and the chickens would be great to eat all of the bugs)?
  • danikanoodles
    danikanoodles Posts: 150 Member
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    mteague277, there were people who ate eggs where I used to live and we tossed them in the compost. Only place for eggs is the compost :)

    The chickens would be way better of in your care I bet. The rabbit rescue I got my bunny from had rescue chickens off the back of the slaughter truck.
  • Kenazwa
    Kenazwa Posts: 278 Member
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    I guess I'll never be vegan since I keep 2 snakes, 1 tortoise, 1 bird, various tropical fish, a cat, a dog, and a red-belly toad. Having my own zoo makes me happy. I try to make my animals happy too. They get good care.

    But I'm still pursuing a plant-based diet.
  • VeganMotoGirl
    VeganMotoGirl Posts: 43 Member
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    I guess I'll never be vegan since I keep 2 snakes, 1 tortoise, 1 bird, various tropical fish, a cat, a dog, and a red-belly toad. Having my own zoo makes me happy. I try to make my animals happy too. They get good care.

    But I'm still pursuing a plant-based diet.

    Don't feel guilty about not fitting in the exact definition of 'Vegan'. I guess technically I would define a vegan as someone that uses/consumes no animal products. But frankly, the labeling is just another way for people to exclude others. It seems to me that it would make others feel like vegans think they are better than non-vegans, when in reality there are just as many jerks who are vegans as there are meat eaters. The elitists vegans try to condemn some the vegetarians for eating dairy and eggs, and denounce vegans for eating honey or wearing leather or wool; or even feeding a pet dog or cat meat. Its all just too subjective. So if you feel like those chickens are not being harmed then by all means eat their eggs. There is no need to change to fit into one persons definition of what to be and how to eat. Just keep following your heart and you can feel good about your choices.
  • mazmataz
    mazmataz Posts: 331 Member
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    I guess I'll never be vegan since I keep 2 snakes, 1 tortoise, 1 bird, various tropical fish, a cat, a dog, and a red-belly toad. Having my own zoo makes me happy. I try to make my animals happy too. They get good care.

    But I'm still pursuing a plant-based diet.

    Don't feel guilty about not fitting in the exact definition of 'Vegan'. I guess technically I would define a vegan as someone that uses/consumes no animal products. But frankly, the labeling is just another way for people to exclude others. It seems to me that it would make others feel like vegans think they are better than non-vegans, when in reality there are just as many jerks who are vegans as there are meat eaters. The elitists vegans try to condemn some the vegetarians for eating dairy and eggs, and denounce vegans for eating honey or wearing leather or wool; or even feeding a pet dog or cat meat. Its all just too subjective. So if you feel like those chickens are not being harmed then by all means eat their eggs. There is no need to change to fit into one persons definition of what to be and how to eat. Just keep following your heart and you can feel good about your choices.

    Well said! :drinker:
  • Kenazwa
    Kenazwa Posts: 278 Member
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    Thank you. I was considering leaving this group due to not really fitting the philosophy. But I do want a place to talk about my choices and progression. I'm having no problem with the vegetarian diet, but I'm pushing toward the completely plant-based diet as much as old habits will let me.