What's On Your Mind Today?

135

Replies

  • MadisonMolly2017
    MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 9,979 Member
    @bradkcrew, I think it isn't just you, but for many if not most who struggle with their weight the reason isn't from emotional eating but it is a bio-chemical issue. Sure, sometimes it can be an emotion that causes us to turn to a certain food, but it is what happens physiologically in our body that causes us to overeat that particular food, sometimes to the point of bingeing.
    The combination of sugar/fat/flour are very addictive to some. Sugar and flour cause our blood sugar level to rise which causes the insulin in our blood to rise. This signals certain brain chemicals/hormones to kick into gear, the "feel good" chemicals. The part of our brain that is supposed to control our appetite is taken over by the feel good chemicals, so instead of telling us "you've had enough to eat you can stop now" we compulsively keep eating and eating. The brain wants to keep that feel good "high" going, and the compulsion to keep feeding the high is hard to put to a stop. For many of us it is easier to avoid those certain foods altogether than to try to eat them in moderation. You have found that by avoiding the pizza, cookies, crackers etc. You've been sticking to whole foods for the most part so your blood sugar stays pretty much stable so that keeps the cravings at bay. Same goes for me. When I keep refined sugar and flour to a minimum that's when I keep my compulsive eating issues in control and I feel satisfied staying within my calorie target. :blush:

    @slimtastesbetter

    I totally agree!

    Much easier to keep those macros/micros moderate than try to get back on track again- for me at least.
  • MadisonMolly2017
    MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 9,979 Member
    Mrs_Hoffer wrote: »
    Babs, VERY, VERY well said!!


    @bradkcrew and @slimtastesbetter that's exactly how I would describe how I am when I'm in ketosis (very low carbs and no sugar!) and yes, as soon as I have just a teensy bit of the wrong kind of carbs.... or have even the smallest amount of sugar - POOF!! I'm out of control! :disappointed: When I'm going along great with the low carb thing - I have terrific willpower to say NO to those foods, or walk right by a chocolate cake! Lol. It amazes even me! But once I get out of ketosis, I seem to struggle for WEEKS to get back to that place (this is where I'm at currently). :disappointed:

    I have personally even compared it to being an alcoholic -- I'm just that bad. (And before someone says something about my comparison to alcoholism, let me just say that I DO know first hand about alcoholism! My mother was an alcoholic, and I also consider myself to be a recovered alcoholic who hasn't had more than 1 beer here or there in many, many YEARS! PTL!) :) But I've learned that I have to be extra cautious and watch foods (sweets, snacks) that effect me as far as my addictive nature. ;) THIS is a big fear of mine and is going to have to be a HUGE part of my learned "maintenance skills" because I still don't feel that I do it very well.

    @Mrs_Hoffer
    My friend, I’d change just one thing about your post. You are not “just that bad”!!! It’s about our bodies & what @slimtastesbetter wrote. It’s not a personal failing. ❤️

    I’m curious. Are you planning to eat “keto” the rest of your life?
  • WhatMeRunning
    WhatMeRunning Posts: 3,538 Member
    I personally dislike the term "keto". It's been tarnished by ideas that you eat nothing but bacon and "fat bombs" (which are for sale now, advertised as fat bombs). But it's also the only way to describe following a diet that puts you in a state of ketosis, which I'm doing, so I go ahead with the "keto" label. But what I eat is quite different from the average person who says they are "keto". Doesn't mean I think I have the ideal diet, other than that it's working extremely well for me (can't argue with the progress and blood labs). So I'm quite happy with it.

    I also think the comparison to alcoholism is appropriate in a sense. We are talking about a biochemical dependency on something, whether it's refined carbs, or alcohol, or drugs, it operates the same in the end. And I don't think anyone who has witnessed what diabetes can do to people can win any argument about how a cake can't be compared to drugs or alcohol. Some people can drink alcohol or take some drugs and have zero issues. For some people it can destroy their lives and their health. I'm honestly surprised I have not heard of an AA type program around diet.

    Just commenting, it's been fascinating reading others thoughts here.

    I suspect a number of people find a manageable diet just so happens to be "keto" in terms of net carbs, even if that's not the goal. Just a guess though.
  • MadisonMolly2017
    MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 9,979 Member
    Mrs_Hoffer wrote: »
    @MadisonMolly2017 as always, thanks so much for your insight and input!

    To clarify what I meant by "I'm just that bad" wasn't that I think I'M bad, but that my body's reaction to the excess carbs and/or sugar is "just as bad" (as comparable to an alcoholic). I've been known to eat half a bag or oreo cookies because I just couldn't stop! Someone who doesn't have a problem with alcohol says to the alcoholic "just have one or two, then stop". They clearly don't understand the disease.

    I don't consider myself eating keto (currently). I did do the keto diet back in 2018, and lost 60 lbs in 8 months. Then, around Thanksgiving that year I stopped eating keto -- and over the next 2 years I gained 40 of it back. This time around, instead of conscientiously setting out to do a keto plan, I was just trying to make sure that the only carbs that I ate were from freggies. (I'm also gluten free, so I don't have near as much bread, pasta, etc as others might. I think that helps as well.) After several weeks of eating that way, I noticed that my net carbs consistently stayed under 25% daily. That was very insightful to me.

    @Mrs_Hoffer
    Awesome- got it!!
    You are not alone with cookies. I just don’t eat them now. A miracle but not worth regaining.

    Sorry I misunderstood!!

    Hugs
    🌸Maddie
  • bradkcrew
    bradkcrew Posts: 1,129 Member
    edited October 2021
    Thanks @MadisonMolly2017 @WhatMeRunning @slimtastesbetter @summerskier @Mrs_hoffer I have been really busy but I do plan to respond when I get a chance. So much good info and it is great to hear that others have the same experience.
  • Jana_2020
    Jana_2020 Posts: 682 Member
    @_JeffreyD_ I've waited patiently for your Inktober posts! Are you not participating this year?!
  • _JeffreyD_
    _JeffreyD_ Posts: 1,526 Member
    Jana_2020 wrote: »
    @_JeffreyD_ I've waited patiently for your Inktober posts! Are you not participating this year?!

    I have not done any this year! Thanks for noticing. Ha! Shame on me.
  • Jana_2020
    Jana_2020 Posts: 682 Member
    _JeffreyD_ wrote: »
    Jana_2020 wrote: »
    @_JeffreyD_ I've waited patiently for your Inktober posts! Are you not participating this year?!

    I have not done any this year! Thanks for noticing. Ha! Shame on me.

    I waited for a bit, then thought perhaps I had the wrong month, and finally I checked to see if you had unfriended me on IG, lol. Well, I hope all is well and you are finding other ways to have fun. I've noticed your sense of humour is all there in your posts, so my guess is yes. :)
  • bradkcrew
    bradkcrew Posts: 1,129 Member
    edited October 2021
    @bradkcrew, I think it isn't just you, but for many if not most who struggle with their weight the reason isn't from emotional eating but it is a bio-chemical issue. Sure, sometimes it can be an emotion that causes us to turn to a certain food, but it is what happens physiologically in our body that causes us to overeat that particular food, sometimes to the point of bingeing.
    The combination of sugar/fat/flour are very addictive to some. Sugar and flour cause our blood sugar level to rise which causes the insulin in our blood to rise. This signals certain brain chemicals/hormones to kick into gear, the "feel good" chemicals. The part of our brain that is supposed to control our appetite is taken over by the feel good chemicals, so instead of telling us "you've had enough to eat you can stop now" we compulsively keep eating and eating. The brain wants to keep that feel good "high" going, and the compulsion to keep feeding the high is hard to put to a stop. For many of us it is easier to avoid those certain foods altogether than to try to eat them in moderation. You have found that by avoiding the pizza, cookies, crackers etc. You've been sticking to whole foods for the most part so your blood sugar stays pretty much stable so that keeps the cravings at bay. Same goes for me. When I keep refined sugar and flour to a minimum that's when I keep my compulsive eating issues in control and I feel satisfied staying within my calorie target. :blush:

    @slimtastesbetter I agree, I have never considered myself an emotional eater. However, as far back as I can remember, even as a skinny kindergartener, I ate huge amounts of food. I can eat, and eat...and eat. I have never really defined it as "binging" because for me it was just how I normally eat if I am not actively controlling my consumption.

    I have seen documentaries and read articles about how food manufacturers intentionally manipulate processed foods to make consumers crave them in an addictive way, and I truly believe my body is susceptible to it. Nothing else explains why I can easily control my eating when I remove processed foods from my system. Just like not everyone who drinks or uses drugs becomes dependent, I guess food also affects different people different ways.

    I am never satisfied with just a little bit of something, so it is senseless for me to indulge in a sliver of cheesecake, or a small fry, or one taco--it just sends my cravings through the roof. So it bothers me when people are critical of my rigid diet, claiming it's not sustainable and that I am setting myself up for failure, etc. I really appreciate that you understand where I am coming from!
  • bradkcrew
    bradkcrew Posts: 1,129 Member
    edited October 2021
    bradkcrew wrote: »
    @MadisonMolly2017 The lack of hunger and cravings is one of the reasons I am fearful of not sticking with my current plan.

    I don't understand the science behind it, but maybe someone else does and will chime in. When I am eating indiscriminately I am hungry ALL of the time. I would describe my current diet as basically whole foods, with most calories coming from vegetables. Once I got myself "detoxed" ( and this has been true with previous weight loss as well), within the first week the hunger and cravings were gone and it has held true for over 6 months. I mean sure, occasionally I feel a little hungry, but that hunger can be satisfied with the foods/calories allotted. I can count on one hand the number of times I have hit my calorie goal and wanted something more to eat. I could have easily satisfied the hunger with 100-150 calorie fruit, etc., but chose not to for my UAC streak.

    So...that is why when people say no foods should be off limits, that doesn't work for me. I know what happens with me if I have that one piece of pizza, or that one cookie, or even portion out 100 calories of crackers. I can't just go out to dinner and have one cheat meal and get right back to it the next morning. Everything goes to $%#^ and I am out of control again.

    The most difficult part is not following the eating plan, but the social aspect. Everything revolves around food and drink, and people see how thin I appear and don't understand why I always say, "no, I can't taste that, I can't just have a couple cocktails, I can't come to your house for lasagna, I can't go out for Mexican food, I can't go to the wine tasting, no I don't want to go out to eat or have a cake for my birthday, etc."

    So in summary, for me food is not just a psychological addition, but there is some sort of physical addiction at play as well, and that is why I have always failed to maintain my weight loss and am so afraid it is going to happen again if I crack open the door.

    @bradkcrew
    Exactly the same for me.
    We don’t eat out; we don’t get take out, no alcohol, no sugar In the house except for 3 items we can Control.

    One of the things I think has been important in MFP for me is to realize we all come to this point in time after different histories. A book was recommended awhile back (but I have been unable to re-find it) that said we live in a “toxic food environment” - I thought wow she’s going too far, but then I learned _~ 75% (3 in 4!!! American adults are overweight or obese) I began to think she was right. Then my Gastro dr said it’s. Lear now (after decades of them saying what we ate didn’t matter) that processed foods Create Crohn’s, Ulcer. Colitis, etc. They identified 7 in particular. Most of which are in ice cream. Toxic Food Environment.

    I deal with the social aspects too, but I’ve found my healthy friends PREFER going for a. Walk!! B

    I have figured out the levels of different foods that keep my “mouth hunger” at bay.

    When a friend insisted on surprising me with my favorite cake & wine despite my letting her know twice I don’t consume either… I had to re-think friendship because I’d even confided in her that eating these things is similar to being an alcoholic. (I’ve had alcoholics disagree with me in here…that’s fine) but still after 3 years of maintenance, they could trigger regain.

    I’m At peace with it. FeelsGREAT to be healthy & fit❣️

    @MadisonMolly2017 I take your point about the similarity to alcoholism. Although it seems perfectly logical that I should be able to have one meal, or one cheat day, or fall off the wagon for a few days even, and just pick right back up where I left off, it just DOESN'T work that way. Just like with alcoholism and drug addiction...once you slip it is just so hard mentally AND physically to get back in the zone. That is why even for my birthday, I decided it just wasn't worth. I am still on the fence on how to handle Thanksgiving...one day at a time is a pretty good mantra I suppose!
  • bradkcrew
    bradkcrew Posts: 1,129 Member
    edited October 2021
    bradkcrew wrote: »
    @MadisonMolly2017 Thank you!

    I have decided to keep it simple for awhile and just continue with the same way I have been eating. I continually lose weight, I am rarely hungry, and I have not had a craving or veered off course once in over 6 months. Clearly the number of calories, (although too low according to popular opinion) is sufficient or I would not be building muscle and endurance at the level I have, nor would it have been sustainable for so many months.

    However, I reserve the right to change my mind tomorrow!!

    the most important part of this idea is the last sentence. Maintenance is NOT a static thing. It changes as you change. Just as with losing weight sometimes you have to adjust the balance of what or when you are eating or how much you are working out. But you have a good mind set April and the biggest failures I have seen in maintenance are those who attempt to control EVERYTHING at once and keep controlling it forever. That's an impossible task and eventually leads to burn out and giving up. Keep experimenting and learning about YOU.

    @SummerSkier True about controlling everything forever, and I am certainly hitting the wall when it comes to exercise. I pushed myself to hit my running goal for the 15k, then this week I found it impossible to get myself to even run a mile. There is no sensible explanation for it. Same for the weight work outs--it is becoming harder and harder to force myself to do it. Clearly I need to regroup and find other forms of exercise to focus on for at least awhile, and convince myself it doesn't have to be a failure, just a pivot. I just don't know what the new plan should be, so this week I just did a little of this, a little of that, but at least I kept at doing something.
  • readyornot1234
    readyornot1234 Posts: 1,027 Member
    @bradkcrew -


    I totally agree with you. Sometimes I think I can indulge in carbs and sugar for 1 day and then I go back to restricting them the very next day. Even though I only indulged the one day, It takes me 4-5 days for the cravings and hunger to stop. The rest of the time I am not hungry and do not crave carbs or sugar. That one day just messes me up. With my illness, gluten hinders remission so I’ve been pretty much gluten free for a long time now. I’m wondering if it’s not just gluten but carbs and sugar in general that I don’t tolerate. People seem to accept when I decline to eat gluten but they freak out about my restricting carbs. I am learning that this isn’t something I can have “cheat” days on. I’m getting to the point where my whole being is telling me it’s just not worth it. I’m hoping I can get to the point where I actually listen. There doesn’t seem to be a “eat this in moderation” solution.

    I’m also aware that some here think 1200 calories is too low. I think everyone needs to find their own number that works for them. I tend to average around 1500 - 1700 per day (depending on my activity level) but that’s me and there are many days that I’m lucky if I get to 1200 because with restricting carbs and sugar, I’m just not hungry. I do know some people plug their goals into MFP and are told 1200 per day and then they post that they are hungry all day. That is unsustainable. It takes time and effort for someone to figure out what works for them individually and I don’t think the 1200 a day, or the way the macros are set up when automatic, works for everyone and for those just starting out, they believe that this is what they need to do, no questions asked.

    I’m hoping I can get to where you are and just stop eating the things I know I can’t eat. It is hard when others, especially our kids and loved ones, want us to share in birthday cakes, etc. I have lost a few friends because I would rather meet to hike or do an activity but they want to go out to dinner and drinks. I don’t even want to do that anymore. But there are times when I feel like I’m being a party pooper or “difficult” or a “special snowflake” and just give in.
  • readyornot1234
    readyornot1234 Posts: 1,027 Member
    @MadisonMolly2017 -

    It’s so true. I was diagnosed with UC over 40 years ago. My docs all told me it had nothing to do with food - just stress and anxiety. Is the book Toxic Food Environment? I tried looking for it online but couldn’t find it.
  • MadisonMolly2017
    MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 9,979 Member
    @MadisonMolly2017 -

    It’s so true. I was diagnosed with UC over 40 years ago. My docs all told me it had nothing to do with food - just stress and anxiety. Is the book Toxic Food Environment? I tried looking for it online but couldn’t find it.

    Hi @readyornot1234
    It’s title was something about Maintenance
    I’m sorry you have UC.
    Hugs,
    Maddie.
  • readyornot1234
    readyornot1234 Posts: 1,027 Member
    @MadisonMolly2017 -

    It’s so true. I was diagnosed with UC over 40 years ago. My docs all told me it had nothing to do with food - just stress and anxiety. Is the book Toxic Food Environment? I tried looking for it online but couldn’t find it.

    Hi @readyornot1234
    It’s title was something about Maintenance
    I’m sorry you have UC.
    Hugs,
    Maddie.

    Thank you. I’m sorry you as well and the transplant. I am thankful for the resolve and ability to learn as much as I can to help all of this through the right food, mindset, etc.
  • KCJen
    KCJen Posts: 1,089 Member
    Over the past few days, I have been adjusting my health goals. Trying to figure out what my specific calorie range was going to be or if I was just going to go back to the 1200 calorie diet I did before (and lost 51 pounds on.) I am a calorie counter and it is what works for me. I have realized I will always be a calorie counter and I will need to always track calories and probably always be on MFP if I am going to have a successful healthy lifestyle.

    I have decided to set my calories at 1500 and then also have a net goal of 1200 in case I need to eat back a few of my exercise calories. The last time I went on my diet, for lunch I ate just salads. I tried that again this past week, and unfortunately, I just can't eat salads anymore at the moment. I had no desire to eat them and it was a struggle and I had to force myself to eat. I am looking into pasta salads for lunch currently.

    That whole experience made me think about how I think about diets. I still have my "diet" mentality. I have a list of foods in my brain that are good and bad when I am on my diet. Bad foods can not be eaten when on my diet, but I can eat them when I am not on my diet. I NOW understand my problem and see why I am always on a roller coaster yo-yo diet. After I lose weight, I go back to the old eating habits that made me fat in the first place.

    I am trying to learn that there are no bad or good foods. There is only a calorie range for me to adhere to. I can eat pizza if it fits within that day's calorie range. I can have coffee creamer in the morning as long as I actually track the calories and use the correct portion size instead of just pouring in some creamer in my coffee cup all nilly-willy.

    This is going to be a major struggle in my mind. All of my life I have been a roller coaster dieter. When I am on my diet I don't eat "outside calories". I always eat at home - salads for lunch, coffee for breakfast, skinless chicken breast and broccoli for dinner, and if I need a snack it will be grapes or cottage cheese and blueberries.

    I think learning correct portion sizes will help in learning how to eat whatever I would like and stay within my calorie range. I am so excited to use my cute ramekins I have. Over the weekend I updated my pantry and got different types of pasta for my pasta salads for lunch.

    Its going to take me a little bit, and I am going to need help and trust me I will ask several questions as I start to figure this out. I am so grateful for this group!

    Speaking of a question - which really isn't a question yet, because I am just going to try it again. I try to have "breakfast for supper" one night a week for my son and me. I made pancakes last night for dinner since pancakes were always on the "no-no" list while on a diet. I started to try to figure out how to calculate the calories and gave up. I realized later, I misread the food label. lol. I think right now, as I am starting to measure portions, use my food scale and read food labels again I am just experiencing sticker shock! I misread the label thinking one pancake will be 180 calories when it is actually 3 pancakes for 180 calories (or 60 calories per pancake). But my question is the label says 180 calories of dry mix - but since the mix only requires water to be added, its safe to assume its 180 calories for 3 pancakes? I think it was a hungry jack light pancake mix.


    I am in a rush, but wanted to get caught up in my postings and post this to get everyone's thoughts. Happy Tuesday everyone!



  • jamcnewman
    jamcnewman Posts: 1,796 Member
    @KCJen You post made me want to give you a standing ovation because truly, you just turned on your own “light bulb of insight” 💡Acknowledging that with you. Huge moment. 🌟

    My response to your question is only based on how I would interpret the label — and it is yes, the calories for the dry mix is, if you only add water, the total for however many pancakes that amount produced (adding, of course, any oil or cooking spray for the pan, syrup on top, etc.).

    Pancakes are one of those foods that, for me, had a really “bad” status. Most because they would set me off on a days long carbohydrate craving (and I am not on a keto or carb-free approach — they just seemed to be the perfect bomb). My nutritionist Heather helped me with this last month when we were looking at protein and how to get mine up. Dry skim milk powder. Yes, it adds calories, but no fat, all the calories are protein, it doesn’t distort the flavour, and has no “artificial or chemical ingredients”. I tried it — oh my goodness. Delicious AND the higher protein, for me, seemed to tame the carb monster that is normally looking for satisfaction for days on end. Game changer for me.

    You are doing great Jen 🥰
    Julie