HM training plan

TavistockToad
TavistockToad Posts: 35,719 Member
edited March 2017 in Social Groups
Me again!!

Currently I am training for my second half marathon on 14th May but am struggling a bit so wpuld like to get sone thoughts and ideas!

My current training plan is:

1 x short run
1× fartlek or short run
1 x long run - did 12 miles fairly comfortably last weekend so I know I'm good for distance.
2 x exercise bike, one steady pace session and one intervals - 20- 40 minutes depending how my legs feel.
1 x yoga
and on biking days I half heartedly do some planks, press ups and a quick upper body dumbell routine.

I've struggled with runger a bit as I am trying to lose the last few pounds (currently 136lbs and my happy range is 130 - 132lbs) but can't even hold a 200 calorie deficit with the miles I'm doing. I didn't eat enough the 3 days after my 12 miles so have been starving and tired all week.

I'm happy(ish) to ditch the deficit until after my race as I really want a PB, but I also want to lose the squish.

I'm not fussed about the number on the scale as much as looking better in my bikini, so what's the best way to add in a proper strength training routine? How do other runners do that without it affecting their running performance? Or am I better waiting till after my race when I can reduce my mileage?

Thanks!

Replies

  • pondee629
    pondee629 Posts: 2,469 Member

    "so what's the best way to add in a proper strength training routine?"
    http://www.furman.edu/sites/first/Documents/16_oct2324.pdf

    For your consideration.
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,719 Member
    pondee629 wrote: »
    "so what's the best way to add in a proper strength training routine?"
    http://www.furman.edu/sites/first/Documents/16_oct2324.pdf

    For your consideration.

    It didn't all show as text, but what I could read was interesting, thanks.
  • lcyama
    lcyama Posts: 209 Member
    i can never calorie restrict when i'm training for a half, because otherwise i am rungry All The Time. i find that on long run days, my net calories are way lower than goal, but the next two days after that i want to eat everything in sight. those are the days i have to work really hard to maintain.
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,719 Member
    lcvrablik wrote: »
    i can never calorie restrict when i'm training for a half, because otherwise i am rungry All The Time. i find that on long run days, my net calories are way lower than goal, but the next two days after that i want to eat everything in sight. those are the days i have to work really hard to maintain.

    Maintenance is the conclusion I am coming to as well!
  • BeeerRunner
    BeeerRunner Posts: 728 Member
    I run 5x a week, XT once, and do strength training 2x a week. I was doing Body Pump when preparing for both my HMs. I like it because it's more about high reps / low weight. When training for my marathon, I stopped when I had Runner's Knee. Now, my son has soccer schedule conflicts with class times so I'm working on creating my own weight training program that is a combination of barbell weights, dumbells, core, some body weight exercoses and plyometrics that are supposed to be beneficial to runners. I've only done it once so far, but I'm scheduled to do it again today.

    You don't have much to lose to get to your goal weight. I went on vacation early August last year, gained about 8 lbs over goal weight, lost a few, then went to Afghanistan for 2.5 weeks where food is the highlight of the day. Lol! I still ran over there, but I walked A LOT more than normal too. I came back 5 lbs over goal weight in mid September and was able to lose it by my 1st half on October 1st. It's hard, but I wanted to be at my prime weight. I finished in a little over 1:48:00 and won 2nd in my AG.

    I guess I'm trying to say it's possible to train and eat in a small deficit, but it's hard and took a lot of will power. On the other hand, the amount of weight you are over goal weight isn't going to have a major impact so if you just want to maintain until after the race, that's fine too. The thing is that if you still plan to do long runs after your half, you're still going to have the rungry issue.
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,654 Member
    You are really doing minimal running for a half. Increasing your miles would help burn more calories and would increase your enjoyment on race day. (I found a big difference between running 25 mpw and 35 mpw, including an 8 minute PR.) On your short days or on your yoga day you could add in 20-30 minutes of strength training or HIIT. OTOH, I don't know your schedule, and it may be that you don't have time for a full hour each day.

    As to the runger - more protein helps and lots of fruit instead of drinking my calories. I found that just tracking what I was eating helped me this training cycle because I used to just say, "I ran 10 miles, I can eat whatever I want." But now I realize that if I do that, I will go way over on calories. Sometimes I do that anyway, but knowing how many calories I'm eating has gotten me to cut down on what I eat and make smarter choices. Going a bit over one day and eating less on other days usually averages out for me.
  • daj150
    daj150 Posts: 815 Member
    I'll start off with weight loss while endurance training. The simple explanation, not a good idea because you are typically going to be burning more muscle being at a caloric deficit. There are plenty of articles you can search for on the details of this if you like. However, if you really want to lose weight during, you need to be really focused on your nutrition. This typically means a lot more protein. This will also help you combat your runger.

    Next, you need to add strength training to this. Yes, many runners don't strength train and end up just fine. However, most runners need to strength train. It promotes so many good things, there are too many to list; aiding in injury prevention, improved speed, improved performance, just to name some biggies. However, you don't need to be a body builder. Just get in at last 2 full body sessions...preferably 3, but 2 should be minimum.

    Finally, your run schedule is minimal but definitely fine, as long as the 2 non-long runs are high intensity. You will see the most benefit from quality over quantity. Tried and true minimal is Sprint/Intervals, Tempo, Long. Looks like you probably are doing that.

    As a final note, usually to combat runger for myself, I have a protein shake after my runs...I am pretty hooked on Quest protein...soooo tasty. I do this for marathon and triathlon training as well.
  • JustSomeEm
    JustSomeEm Posts: 20,173 MFP Moderator
    I'm going to second (third?) the protein after a long run. It's kept me from gaining weight during this training season... so I'm able to maintain, rather than the gaining I was doing. I don't like shakes though, so I usually just make some scrambled eggs (in butter) or on my lazy days I'll just eat some cottage cheese or yogurt (with honey) after. Then the rest of the day (and the day after) I'm 'munchy', so I'll usually have a ton of fruit and veggies around.

    About the resistance training: I'm always injuring myself during half training. This time I bought Chalean extreme, and have been doing that 3 days a week (30 to 45 minutes of strength training each time, so doesn't take too long AND I can do it at home... HATE the gym). My half is scheduled for Sunday, and for once, I'm going into the race really well prepared since I didn't injure myself and therefore didn't have to take recovery time in the middle of training. I'm crediting Chalean.... Also - my run times are about 30 seconds per mile faster this time around. Which I also credit to the strength training program I'm doing.
  • codename_steve
    codename_steve Posts: 255 Member
    I avoid runger by increasing fat, as well as the protein previously mentioned, and ensuring to re-hydrate after a run.

    For strength I do Stronglifts 5x5 2 days a week during full marathon training, and 3 days a week in between training cycles.