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How hard do you push yourself?

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Z_I_L_L_A
Z_I_L_L_A Posts: 2,399 Member
I hadn't noticed until lately. No matter what level you are, if you're not on the floor in a pool of sweat and gasping for air. Then do you think you pushed yourself hard enough?

I also noticed at my box that the women(not pointing out that women don't push hard enough) get done quicker, not out of breath or sweating. I wonder why they don't add more weight or do more reps. I do, if its too easy than what are you getting out of it?
Is it because you think you're gonna get muscle bound or are you just maintaining?

I'm am gonna hold back my hi five and fist bump if you don't do more,lol.
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Replies

  • xX_Samantha_Xx
    xX_Samantha_Xx Posts: 166 Member
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    I definitely push myself. The only time I have to rest is if I feel like I'm pushing myself TOO hard. I don't want a heart attack trying to finish my kettlebell snatches. Sometimes my heart races so fast I just need to catch my breath a second. I definitely don't slack off though. It's for good reason that I'm doing this. I want the workout. I love coming to Crossfit. Never thought in a million years I'd have "fun" working out.. But I do. LoL.
  • Z_I_L_L_A
    Z_I_L_L_A Posts: 2,399 Member
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    Thats great, I stop and take a breath too. But at the end I'm still on the floor out of breath. lol
  • fakeplastictree
    fakeplastictree Posts: 836 Member
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    some WODs I have to break more. I'm horrible at cardio and get all super out of breath easily. So I make sure that I do stuff as hard as I can before actually passing out. lol. Which usually makes me come in last but that's ok. cause I know it's because I'm working hard.
  • georgie304
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    Everyone I see is always laid out, sweating, trying to catch their breath. Males and females.

    Go big or go home!
  • Dmkolls
    Dmkolls Posts: 150 Member
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    I'm still fairly new and have a history of lower back problems. So, I do tend to err on the side of caution with weights until I'm confident in my form and strength. I've heard and seen others in my box that pushed too hard and either injured themselves or ended up with rhabdo (including a coach).

    This does not mean that I'm not pouring in sweat or am drained afterwards, but I do notice the men are literally on the floor.

    I drive a standard, and there are some nights after my WOD my left leg shakes like crazy when pressing the clutch.
  • Tobi1013
    Tobi1013 Posts: 732 Member
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    I definitely push myself, but I do so in the smartest way that I can. Yesterday, I could feel the pull in my abs during the warm up so I knew that I would need to go lighter on the weights for floor to overhead and kettlebell sit ups. What I lacked in weight, I made up for in rounds so the workout was more of a cardio blast for me than it was for some of the folks that went heavier/Rx'd. I'm perfectly okay with that, though, because it means that I am in good enough shape to go back today and hit the WOD as hard as my body will allow.
  • momof2osaurus
    momof2osaurus Posts: 477 Member
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    I push myself a little bit past where I think I can go, because I've learned my brain usually underestimates what my body can do. That being said, my hardest still involves taking breaks, there isn't much I can do unbroken.

    I can't even fathom not sweating post-WOD. Not on the floor every time, but not sweating or out of breath??
  • miqisha
    miqisha Posts: 1,534 Member
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    I am always sweating and gasping for breath, I can't even shout TIME when done, I check my time and walk over to the board and give it and then crash on the floor somewhere for a good 5-10 minutes, then put my stuff away.

    The minute I feel I am going through a routine with weights that are not giving me some kind of struggle then it is time to move on up in weights, if it is even by 5 pounds......
  • momof2osaurus
    momof2osaurus Posts: 477 Member
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    I am always sweating and gasping for breath, I can't even shout TIME when done, I check my time and walk over to the board and give it and then crash on the floor somewhere for a good 5-10 minutes, then put my stuff away.

    What is the shouting "TIME" thing?? No one at my box does that.
  • Z_I_L_L_A
    Z_I_L_L_A Posts: 2,399 Member
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    I am always sweating and gasping for breath, I can't even shout TIME when done, I check my time and walk over to the board and give it and then crash on the floor somewhere for a good 5-10 minutes, then put my stuff away.

    What is the shouting "TIME" thing?? No one at my box does that.

    Yeah, I can't shout anything. Lack of oxygen,lol.
  • ascrit
    ascrit Posts: 770 Member
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    At the end of most workouts I have to sit down and catch my breath but I never just lay on the ground. I think it is harder to catch your breath that way. Plus the floor is dirty.

    Sometimes I think people kind of play up their exhaustion a little bit for effect. You don't have to look half-dead to prove that you worked out hard. Besides, the only person you have to prove anything to is yourself so if you feel good about what you just did then there is no need to fall over in a heap.
  • rmk20togo
    rmk20togo Posts: 353 Member
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    I've only been doing CF since April and I'm still learning my limits, by going past them and falling short. I've had two WOD where I probably pushed too hard - almost vomited, didn't even look at the clock much less call time, couldn't eat and was shaky for hours after. I've also had a few WODs where I underestimated my weight and know I could have gone heavier or tried to pace myself and know I could have gone harder. It doesn't matter to me if people finish first because their weight load is light. First, I ALWAYS finish last (20+ years older than everyone else) and, second, the only person you hurt is yourself if you take it easy.
  • xX_Samantha_Xx
    xX_Samantha_Xx Posts: 166 Member
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    I am always sweating and gasping for breath, I can't even shout TIME when done, I check my time and walk over to the board and give it and then crash on the floor somewhere for a good 5-10 minutes, then put my stuff away.

    What is the shouting "TIME" thing?? No one at my box does that.

    People who finish before the clock during a timed WOD shout "time" at my box as soon as they finish. It's to record how quickly they finished that WOD - I assume for recording purposes to see if they improve. Just like timing a race I guess.
  • bostonwolf
    bostonwolf Posts: 3,038 Member
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    For me it depends on the workout. We did Tabatas last night for score. 8 rounds of pull ups, push ups, sit ups, air squats, calorie row.

    Your score was the LOWEST number of reps you got. So if you blasted off at 10 then your last set was 3, your score was 3. So our coaches said try to find a pace you can hold for eight rounds and do it. So clearly pull ups, push ups you are going to reach muscle failure at some point. Air squats you can just go balls to the wall.

    My last calorie row I went as hard as possible. Score was 3 calories, got 6 on the last one. Needed about 90 seconds to actually stand up.

    I will say that (maybe....possibly) the fact that more men played organized sports might be a factor? I have a pretty good idea of what my redline is (where Pukey makes an appearance) and have pushed right up to it but not over. I don't want to puke but I know that at some point I'm going to be damned close to PRing Grace or a similar workout and I'm gonna say "**** it" and set the PR and head outside.

    I've noticed the women in my box who I know were jocks will more often be sweating, wind-sucking messes like the guys.

    Might also be that our testosterone makes us enjoy that extra effort a bit more than the women do.
  • RivenV
    RivenV Posts: 1,667 Member
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    At the end of most workouts I have to sit down and catch my breath but I never just lay on the ground. I think it is harder to catch your breath that way. Plus the floor is dirty.

    Sometimes I think people kind of play up their exhaustion a little bit for effect. You don't have to look half-dead to prove that you worked out hard. Besides, the only person you have to prove anything to is yourself so if you feel good about what you just did then there is no need to fall over in a heap.

    Lol... This is the reason we're friends--the floor is dirty; I don't want to be sweating all over it, either. I workout hard and I've often got a sweat-angel on my lower back to prove it, but, all things considered, I know I'm just competing against myself

    2b2.gif
  • ascrit
    ascrit Posts: 770 Member
    Options
    At the end of most workouts I have to sit down and catch my breath but I never just lay on the ground. I think it is harder to catch your breath that way. Plus the floor is dirty.

    Sometimes I think people kind of play up their exhaustion a little bit for effect. You don't have to look half-dead to prove that you worked out hard. Besides, the only person you have to prove anything to is yourself so if you feel good about what you just did then there is no need to fall over in a heap.

    Lol... This is the reason we're friends--the floor is dirty; I don't want to be sweating all over it, either. I workout hard and I've often got a sweat-angel on my lower back to prove it, but, all things considered, I know I'm just competing against myself

    <3<3<3
  • sara_m83
    sara_m83 Posts: 545 Member
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    I just changed boxes after moving across the city and I am really astounded by the culture in my new box of girls not pushing themselves or each other. They are afraid of failing lifts or working too hard. But it's also not helped by the coaches who don't push the girls to push themselves. We recently did "Cindy" and the coach encouraged the girls the scale the length of the WOD as well as movements - so most of the girls only did 12 minutes instead of the full 20. This is a mentality I do not understand and that I find frustrating.

    I am trying to foster more of a collegiate sense of pushing each other amongst the females in my new box much like I had at my old one. Girls were constantly telling each other, "you can lift more. Give it a go!" I don't think these attempts are being well received. The unfortunate thing is, without that communal encouragement, I'm beginning to find myself overscaling or at least not pushing myself as much as I would have at my old box :(
  • sara_m83
    sara_m83 Posts: 545 Member
    Options
    I've only been doing CF since April and I'm still learning my limits, by going past them and falling short. I've had two WOD where I probably pushed too hard - almost vomited, didn't even look at the clock much less call time, couldn't eat and was shaky for hours after. I've also had a few WODs where I underestimated my weight and know I could have gone heavier or tried to pace myself and know I could have gone harder. It doesn't matter to me if people finish first because their weight load is light. First, I ALWAYS finish last (20+ years older than everyone else) and, second, the only person you hurt is yourself if you take it easy.

    If you are shaky and nauseous after a workout, have protein and quick! Protein consumption (I normally have a protein shake after a particularly rigorous workout leaves me feeling this way) within 30min of a hard workout helps recovery. Protein provides the amino acids necessary to rebuild muscle tissue that is damaged during intense, prolonged exercise. It can also increase the absorption of water from the intestines and improve muscle hydration. The amino acids in protein can also stimulate the immune system, making you more resistant to colds and other infections.
  • RivenV
    RivenV Posts: 1,667 Member
    Options
    I just changed boxes after moving across the city and I am really astounded by the culture in my new box of girls not pushing themselves or each other. They are afraid of failing lifts or working too hard. But it's also not helped by the coaches who don't push the girls to push themselves. We recently did "Cindy" and the coach encouraged the girls the scale the length of the WOD as well as movements - so most of the girls only did 12 minutes instead of the full 20. This is a mentality I do not understand and that I find frustrating.

    I am trying to foster more of a collegiate sense of pushing each other amongst the females in my new box much like I had at my old one. Girls were constantly telling each other, "you can lift more. Give it a go!" I don't think these attempts are being well received. The unfortunate thing is, without that communal encouragement, I'm beginning to find myself overscaling or at least not pushing myself as much as I would have at my old box :(

    I think that it takes time to get to that mentality of pushing yourself and wanting to be pushed. I went to my first real, actual CrossFit workout the other day after having done similar workouts on my own at a gym. I think we can all admit that it's an infectious atmosphere if you're excited about fitness and improving yourself. If I had gone to a box for a WoD when I first started working out (again) ~110 days ago, I would have felt more "out of my league" and discouraged than anything else if I had felt pushed that way--even when it's meant positively and for my own benefit. Now that I feel better about the shape I'm in and I'm ready to push my own limits, I love being pushed a little. I haven't Rxed even one yet, but I like the progress I'm making and I know now that if I want to continue to see similar results, I need to continue to strive for excellence. Based on your post, I'm guessing you think the same way.
    Maybe you could lead by example at your new box? Talk to the trainer and tell him/her that you want to be pushed a little more, even if the other gals don't. That's part of what the trainers are there for, right? I've heard it said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. When they see your gains, maybe they'll join you. I presume the atmosphere you're trying to foster will follow that.
  • ascrit
    ascrit Posts: 770 Member
    Options
    I just changed boxes after moving across the city and I am really astounded by the culture in my new box of girls not pushing themselves or each other. They are afraid of failing lifts or working too hard. But it's also not helped by the coaches who don't push the girls to push themselves. We recently did "Cindy" and the coach encouraged the girls the scale the length of the WOD as well as movements - so most of the girls only did 12 minutes instead of the full 20. This is a mentality I do not understand and that I find frustrating.

    I am trying to foster more of a collegiate sense of pushing each other amongst the females in my new box much like I had at my old one. Girls were constantly telling each other, "you can lift more. Give it a go!" I don't think these attempts are being well received. The unfortunate thing is, without that communal encouragement, I'm beginning to find myself overscaling or at least not pushing myself as much as I would have at my old box :(

    I think that it takes time to get to that mentality of pushing yourself and wanting to be pushed. I went to my first real, actual CrossFit workout the other day after having done similar workouts on my own at a gym. I think we can all admit that it's an infectious atmosphere if you're excited about fitness and improving yourself. If I had gone to a box for a WoD when I first started working out (again) ~110 days ago, I would have felt more "out of my league" and discouraged than anything else if I had felt pushed that way--even when it's meant positively and for my own benefit. Now that I feel better about the shape I'm in and I'm ready to push my own limits, I love being pushed a little. I haven't Rxed even one yet, but I like the progress I'm making and I know now that if I want to continue to see similar results, I need to continue to strive for excellence. Based on your post, I'm guessing you think the same way.
    Maybe you could lead by example at your new box? Talk to the trainer and tell him/her that you want to be pushed a little more, even if the other gals don't. That's part of what the trainers are there for, right? I've heard it said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. When they see your gains, maybe they'll join you. I presume the atmosphere you're trying to foster will follow that.

    This is good advice. You don't want to come off as pushy.