New brand of shoes with < 2 weeks before first 26.2?

Options
Is this just crazy talk? I've been in Brooks Adrenalines since I started 3.5 years ago. Last time at the shoe store, one of the guys pointed out a Saucony Progrid Omni which is similar (stability shoe for overpronation). I gave them a 100m spin, they felt great and are noticeably lighter. I'd love to give them a try, but I know what I'm getting with the Adrenalines and I'm not sure if changing manufacturer & model is a bright idea as I'm tapering with 11 days to go before my first full. I don't buy that every shoe needs to be broken in, but with only a quick spin around the block on the Saucony's and who knows what will happen over 26+.

Normally I'd probably go with buying a fresh set of both, but I've got some cash restrictions this month.

I posted this question to Hal Higdon's FB. He says he doesn't worry about a specific model, just how they feel. I'm probably overthinking the hell out of this like I do everything else.

Replies

  • redredy9
    redredy9 Posts: 706 Member
    Options
    Thats a really tough question. I personally wouldn't but can you run in your existing Brooks or do they need to be replaced?

    If you could run the race in your existing brooks then you could get the Saucony's and test them out on your final long runs. Do you still have a 16 miler or did you do that this past weekend leaving only your 8?
  • RunnerElizabeth
    RunnerElizabeth Posts: 1,091 Member
    Options
    If your shoes are near the end of their life and you buy the same shoe you have, that's probably fine and wait to change shoes after the new pair wears out. A new brand and model seems risky.

    I noticed my shoes are worn and I was thinking of buying a new pair of my regular shoe for my half, but due to not getting a paycheck I think I'll stick it out, sensitive shins and all.
  • daj150
    daj150 Posts: 815 Member
    Options
    Typically the reason behind not switching shoes up to 2 weeks before a race, especially a long distance race, is dependent on a few things. Shoes are not consistent across brands. For example, a Nike running shoe for a normal foot and arch is different from a comparable shoe from Brooks. Similar how some brands I am a size 12 and others I am a 13. Therefore, you are more running the risk of the support and design structure being different from what your foot is used to. This means (whether you consciously notice or not) that your body is compensating for this new difference. For some, this doesn't matter, but for most, this can mean huge issues.

    Most people think new shoes ahead of time deals with "breaking in" the shoes. That is bogus and you can't ignore that. What I mentioned above is one of the main issues. Just think body mechanics and muscle adjustments to large variations. Now, you may be fine for your race, but there is an extremely large possibility of performing worse than expected or injuring yourself. Even if your current shoes are nearing the end of their life, that is usually better than a new pair from a different brand.
  • DavidMartinez2
    DavidMartinez2 Posts: 840 Member
    Options
    I watched a guy take a pair of Sketcher GoRuns out of the box and run 60K on them. It was when they had just started to introduce them and his running club all got free pairs the night before.
  • redredy9
    redredy9 Posts: 706 Member
    Options
    I watched a guy take a pair of Sketcher GoRuns out of the box and run 60K on them. It was when they had just started to introduce them and his running club all got free pairs the night before.

    That guy was probably a super strong experienced high milage runner not a mere mortal.
  • WhataBroad
    WhataBroad Posts: 1,091 Member
    Options
    friggin rebel =P

    I say as long as they feel good and you can get at least one long run in with them on and they still feel good, meh, why not throw caution to the wind!
  • SonicDeathMonkey80
    SonicDeathMonkey80 Posts: 4,489 Member
    Options
    I switched to Brooks Trance 12's about a month before my first full, but put >100mi on them in that time.
  • twinmom_112002
    twinmom_112002 Posts: 739 Member
    Options
    What is your longest run left? I tried switching brands and knew it was a mistake after about 5 miles. I love that running stores allow you to return shoes that just don't work.
  • PeteWhoLikesToRunAlot
    Options
    Tapering now, longest left is 8 before the full on 10/12. I think I'll just grab a new pair of Adrenalines (both of my current ones are shot), and maybe add the Sauconys after the full.

    Thanks everyone.
  • ATT949
    ATT949 Posts: 1,245 Member
    Options
    Tapering now, longest left is 8 before the full on 10/12. I think I'll just grab a new pair of Adrenalines (both of my current ones are shot), and maybe add the Sauconys after the full.

    Thanks everyone.

    Pete:

    I'm in a similar bind as you - been running in Newton Gravity ($175 a pair) but picked up some Kinvara's a month ago.

    The KV's are so well cushioned that I'm actually running differently. The first time I ran in the KVs, I ran 4 miles and ended up over stressing the tibialis anterior (runs up front of the shin and is one of the key muscles for dorsiflexion), forcing me to cancel a long run. Since then I've done a few easy runs in the KV's and have seen my stride rate drop from 87 to 82 SPM (at LR pace)!

    Unfortunately, I've felt pretty beat up running in my Gravity and Sunday, in the Gravity's, was very no bueno.

    I didn't want to drop another $175 on a pair of Gravity but I needed "something" because I've got a Half on October 13.

    My options were to either run on the KV's and try to get my stride/footstrike back on track OR drop $175 on a new pair of sneaks.

    The new sneaks were my best option. I hate the idea of buying a shoe that I'm trying to transition away from but it was the lesser of two evils.

    Sometimes life's like that, eh? :-)
  • DavidMartinez2
    DavidMartinez2 Posts: 840 Member
    Options
    Pete:

    I'm in a similar bind as you - been running in Newton Gravity ($175 a pair) but picked up some Kinvara's a month ago.

    That is a huge change in shoe; really going from Newton to almost any other brand is going to be a big change. The only other shoe I have seen with something similar to those lugs is OnRunning and it was a much more subtle piece.
  • dorianaldyn
    dorianaldyn Posts: 611 Member
    Options
    I got my hokas a few weeks before the full I just did - I did have my 12 miler and an 8 miler beforehand and I felt like I was in heaven so I went for it. During the race I felt minor irritation on my left heel (but no blister) and I did get a miniscule blister on one of my big toes. My arches felt different, but not really in a bad way. Gone was the pain I had been experiencing in the ball of one foot that was radiating to my toe. So, I got some new pains, got rid of some old pains - all in all I was better off for having made the switch.

    It seems like your instinct is to go with what you know - that's certainly not a poor decision. It is hard... spending a lot of money on shoes when you kind of wish you were running in something else.
  • ATT949
    ATT949 Posts: 1,245 Member
    Options
    Pete:

    I'm in a similar bind as you - been running in Newton Gravity ($175 a pair) but picked up some Kinvara's a month ago.

    That is a huge change in shoe; really going from Newton to almost any other brand is going to be a big change. The only other shoe I have seen with something similar to those lugs is OnRunning and it was a much more subtle piece.

    "Now you tell me!" ;-)

    I'm thinking (hoping, really) it won't be a difficult transition for me.

    I've run in the KV half a dozen times and the only time I've had an issue was the first (4 mile) run.

    Also, the Newtons have an unusual sole but I've always been a mid-foot runner so that aspect won't change.

    What I think I've witnessed is an unconscious reaction to replacing worn out running shoes!

    When I put on the KV's, the amount of cushion shocked me. Now that I've run in new Gravity, I can feel a lot more cushion than the old ones but not as much as the KV (my old Gravity were a 3, KV=10 and the new Gravity≈7.5).

    Now that I've got some cushion under my feet, I'll drop the KV out of the rotation 'til after the Half but I'll report back with how things are going later in the month.

    On the positive side, between the KV's and increased leg strength is that I'm running faster. For the past few weeks, my pace has dropped by about 20 seconds (during LR) at the same HR. My theory is that the extra padding in the KV made it easier for me to change my form and with new Gravity that have some cushion in them, I'm continuing to use the changed gait.

    (My SPM this AM was 83 which is a marked change from running in the Gravity's where I've been >=85 for months)

    Keeping fingers crossed…
  • ATT949
    ATT949 Posts: 1,245 Member
    Options
    I got my hokas a few weeks before the full I just did - I did have my 12 miler and an 8 miler beforehand and I felt like I was in heaven so I went for it. During the race I felt minor irritation on my left heel (but no blister) and I did get a miniscule blister on one of my big toes. My arches felt different, but not really in a bad way. Gone was the pain I had been experiencing in the ball of one foot that was radiating to my toe. So, I got some new pains, got rid of some old pains - all in all I was better off for having made the switch.

    It seems like your instinct is to go with what you know - that's certainly not a poor decision. It is hard... spending a lot of money on shoes when you kind of wish you were running in something else.

    I've heard good comments about the Hoka's and the industry is definitely heading in the direction of low drop, high cushion. Next year's shoes look really interesting.
  • DavidMartinez2
    DavidMartinez2 Posts: 840 Member
    Options

    I've heard good comments about the Hoka's and the industry is definitely heading in the direction of low drop, high cushion. Next year's shoes look really interesting.

    It's funny you say that, I was looking at RT's shoe review and the table they have at the start shows the Kinvara 4 in the middle between "no cushion" and "lots of cushion". The Kinvara 2 is listed as a reference shoe, it is just off the "no cushion" line, so in just two generations that shoe has gone from almost nothing to half-way to Pegasus.
  • dorianaldyn
    dorianaldyn Posts: 611 Member
    Options

    I've heard good comments about the Hoka's and the industry is definitely heading in the direction of low drop, high cushion. Next year's shoes look really interesting.

    I just went on my first post-marathon run this morning and that heavy, fatigued leg feeling that lingered for about three weeks after my first marathon wasn't there this time around. I'd like to think that some of it is better conditioning and an improved mental attitude on my part (26.2 just doesn't seem as far/daunting to me as it first did), but I'm sure I have the Hokas to thank too. They are known for reducing leg fatigue, so they must have helped. Before I probably took it easy for a month after; now I'm wishing my next full was in mid-November instead of April!
  • sarahc001
    sarahc001 Posts: 477 Member
    Options
    I'm on the Hoka love train, too. I can take a pair out of the box and run 30 miles (I did just that with my hoka stinson trail, training on the course for my 50 in Nov. Happy feet, no hot spots!) I also know a friend who bought a pair, and within 24 days did the following training runs: 100km, 30km, 102km, 54km. I guess how much/how soon just depends on the shoe. :smile:

    It is interesting that so many of the 2014 shoes are moving toward minimal drop and maximal cushion...at the Outdoor Retailer show this summer, there were several brands moving in this direction, including Altra, Brooks, and New Balance. Should be interesting!