Long Run % of Weekly total

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TheBrolympus
TheBrolympus Posts: 586 Member
I have heard several people mention that the long run should be around 1/3 of my total weekly mileage. Simple enough.

My goal is to get my long run up to 15 miles a week to see if my knees will hold up to the extra miles and to ultimately see if training for a full marathon is going to be doable (without destroying my knees).

I run 4 times a week and cycle twice a week (cross country mountain biking) and currently my long run is 12 miles. I am averaging 28-30 miles a week (been doing this mileage for 6 months now). According this the above percentage I should be doing 36 miles a week, so I am already light on my weekly miles.

For me to get my long run to 15, that means 45 a week and would end up doing two long runs a week.

My question is, does the biking account for anything? I am already exercising 6 days a week with only one true rest day.
Do I need to just suck it up and add a 5th running day and double up on one of my cycling days?

Sorry if this is confusing. I am trying to take my running to the next level and I am not exactly sure what would be the best way to go about it.

Replies

  • MinimalistShoeAddict
    MinimalistShoeAddict Posts: 1,946 Member
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    I am not sure on the exact reason for your long run needing to be a certain percentage of your total weekly running mileage but I have seen similar numbers to what you cite in many training plans.

    Is there a certain race you are training for (such as a 25k based on your 15 mile long run target)? I ask because it might be easier to just follow an established plan instead of creating your own.

    http://www.halhigdon.com/training/

    Hal Higdon has some nice plans on his websites that I (loosely) followed for both my half marathon and marathon training this year. In the plan I am following now Monday is reserved for Cross Training (cycling for you). Some of his plans also discuss the best days to add in strength training and other exercise. There seem to be many plans available in the mileage range you are looking for.

    The advantage of following a plan is that it will help you gradually build up your mileage while building in recovery weeks and tapering before your race itself.

    Good luck!
  • CarsonRuns
    CarsonRuns Posts: 3,039 Member
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    The regular mileage during the week ensures that you can handle the LSD from a physiological perspective. Those runs strengthen the connective tissues and the running related muscles so that they can handle the stress of the LSD run. Cycling will augment your aerobic fitness, but not do much for running specific adaptations.
  • KeithAngilly
    KeithAngilly Posts: 575 Member
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    I have heard several people mention that the long run should be around 1/3 of my total weekly mileage. Simple enough.

    My goal is to get my long run up to 15 miles a week to see if my knees will hold up to the extra miles and to ultimately see if training for a full marathon is going to be doable (without destroying my knees).

    I run 4 times a week and cycle twice a week (cross country mountain biking) and currently my long run is 12 miles. I am averaging 28-30 miles a week (been doing this mileage for 6 months now). According this the above percentage I should be doing 36 miles a week, so I am already light on my weekly miles.

    For me to get my long run to 15, that means 45 a week and would end up doing two long runs a week.

    My question is, does the biking account for anything? I am already exercising 6 days a week with only one true rest day.
    Do I need to just suck it up and add a 5th running day and double up on one of my cycling days?

    Sorry if this is confusing. I am trying to take my running to the next level and I am not exactly sure what would be the best way to go about it.

    This description is very similar to my normal schedule. I use the FIRST program (3 quality runs, 2 cross training days), which has helped me improve a lot. But, I am a newbie, so any running would have done that. This program isn't for everyone and it certainly has it's skeptics, but as I said, I have improved pretty dramatically over the last year. And, as has already been said, I am not so sure I would get too hung up on the 15% number. I think it's more important to avoid increasing the mileage to quickly. It helps to have a very long term outlook, imho. Build up slowly, allowing your knees to adapt and strengthen.

    Good luck and have fun!
  • mlb929
    mlb929 Posts: 1,974 Member
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    Read Run Less Run Faster, you run 3x and bike 2. Sounds like what you may be looking for. I've used it to take 15 mon off my half time and finish my second marathon despite breaking my ankle during the race. I've got a third Marathon planned for 3 weeks from now. My miles this week have been 13 half marathon. With a PR, 7 intervals, 10 tempo, and new weeks starts 20, 7, 7 for next week.