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"Jogging" versus "Jogger."

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2

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  • PennyVonDread
    PennyVonDread Posts: 432 Member
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    I don't know. I always associate the word"jogging" with bad form. Crossing arms in front, collapsed chest, bouncing motion instead of controlled forward momentum. To me, jogging is like a learning curve for running. That's how it was treated at my schools runners club, anyways.
  • SonicDeathMonkey80
    SonicDeathMonkey80 Posts: 4,489 Member
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    Crap, I meant DougJogging. One more thing: jogging in a track suit in this weather is called "heat training."

    You wish
  • litsy3
    litsy3 Posts: 783 Member
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    Also, we need to take this issue to MFP because of their "X:00/mph Running (jogging)" cardio database entries. Which is it? Huh?!

    It's definitely not the second one when it's 5:30/mile!

    I agree with Josee - I run at easy pace to warm up and cool down but in between reps I will jog.
  • rabblerabble
    rabblerabble Posts: 471 Member
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    I just keep putting one foot in front of the other.

    Can call it anything you'd like and I won't be offended.
  • Bounce2
    Bounce2 Posts: 138 Member
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    I can careless what you call me as long as you don't run me over with your car.

    After this morning; the above ^^^^^^^^ *infinity.. You say tomAto, I say tomaRto, as long as I'm shuffling along I don't care what you call it .
  • sarahc001
    sarahc001 Posts: 477 Member
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    Crap, I meant DougJogging. One more thing: jogging in a track suit in this weather is called "heat training."

    You wish

    I wish for so many things...
  • sarahc001
    sarahc001 Posts: 477 Member
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    Yes! Posted my trail jog and got the comment "awesome jogging!" There you have it....jogging is truly and definitively awesome. Especially when you're heat training in a Bosnian/Jersey velour track suit and listening to "let's get physical" on your Walkman.
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
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    I haven't listened to music while running for some time, but I'm going to buy lets get physical and dedicate my next run to Dave.
  • lockeddoor
    lockeddoor Posts: 103 Member
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    I love you guys.

    Also, in college, I jogged in a terrycloth turquoise track suit. My form was awful, and I only joggled single miles at a time and I justified eating horrendous amounts of junk because of running ONE mile earlier in the day. But terry cloth. In bright turquoise. It's so bad, it almost circles back around to good.

    Now I wish I still had it. I think there are some epic photos that could have been taken, that will now never be.

    Edit: I realized I spelled "joggled" instead of "jogged", and was about to fix it, but I think "joggled" is a much better description of what my running was like back then.
  • KeithAngilly
    KeithAngilly Posts: 575 Member
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    Since my body doesn't understand the difference between "jogging" and "running", then I don't care either. :drinker:
  • Samstan101
    Samstan101 Posts: 699 Member
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    Jogging is something I do across a car park in the rain to get too or from my car whilst wearing my day to day clothes and shoes. Running requires me donning trainers and a sports bra - the pace may be similar but the form is better for the latter (in part because I'm not trying to stop my boobs bouncing with my arms as I jog :tongue:
  • Lachelleofthesea
    Lachelleofthesea Posts: 24 Member
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    If you run, you are a runner... I suppose if you jog, you are a jogger? To each their own. :wink:
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
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    If you run, you are a runner... I suppose if you jog, you are a jogger? To each their own. :wink:

    No! NOT TO EACH THEIR OWN!! This is an organized society, we have to have some damn law and order!! What about the children- won't someone think of the children?!

    It's funny how this was a BIG DEAL to me last year (I started running 18 months ago). And today it's "something I can talk about with other runners simply because there's nothing more fun to do than discuss running and this subject can go on forever."
  • HornedFrogPride
    HornedFrogPride Posts: 283 Member
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    JOGGING my memory to come up with an answer: Jogging seems derogatory and I'm not sure why--is it just a flashback/throwback to the foregone era of the 1970's when ALMOST everyone called it jogging? Is it my Dad's velour "jogging suits"? Are you a jogger? I'm not sure even what that means.

    Perhaps...jogging/joggers has grown and developed into running/runners for most of us. Yes, there are still joggers. But who are they? Jogging is like the grammatical equivalent of using the passive compared to active voice (running) to me.

    Running seems more active, serious (*sometimes-it's fun, too). Jogging seems more recreational (not always, though-what if you fall while jogging and get hurt?). But don't misconstrue me, some of running is recreational but some is metaphysical. Can we really say that about jogging intersecting with metaphysics? (unless a long-slow-distance run is jogging but I still call that running). What kind of endorphin rush do you get from running? What kind of endorphin rush do you get from jogging?

    Jogging seems shorter, fleeting, like jogging 800 meters to your car to escape a large crowd.

    If you are late for a connecting flight, do you run or jog? Running wins again!

    Maybe there is a place for jogging in the life of a runner, perhaps the days you "jog slowly"?

    I admit I might be biased in answering the question (my runblog is runninggrooveshark.com after all-- not "jogging" grooveshark).

    If you jog your memory for what you have forgotten while running, are you a jogger AND a runner? Or just a forgetful runner? Or only a (mind)jogger? Perplexing paradoxical questions!
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
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    JOGGING my memory to come up with an answer: Jogging seems derogatory and I'm not sure why--is it just a flashback/throwback to the foregone era of the 1970's when ALMOST everyone called it jogging? Is it my Dad's velour "jogging suits"? Are you a jogger? I'm not sure even what that means.

    Perhaps...jogging/joggers has grown and developed into running/runners for most of us. Yes, there are still joggers. But who are they? Jogging is like the grammatical equivalent of using the passive compared to active voice (running) to me.

    Running seems more active, serious (*sometimes-it's fun, too). Jogging seems more recreational (not always, though-what if you fall while jogging and get hurt?). But don't misconstrue me, some of running is recreational but some is metaphysical. Can we really say that about jogging intersecting with metaphysics? (unless a long-slow-distance run is jogging but I still call that running). What kind of endorphin rush do you get from running? What kind of endorphin rush do you get from jogging?

    Jogging seems shorter, fleeting, like jogging 800 meters to your car to escape a large crowd.

    If you are late for a connecting flight, do you run or jog? Running wins again!

    Maybe there is a place for jogging in the life of a runner, perhaps the days you "jog slowly"?

    I admit I might be biased in answering the question (my runblog is runninggrooveshark.com after all-- not "jogging" grooveshark).

    If you jog your memory for what you have forgotten while running, are you a jogger AND a runner? Or just a forgetful runner? Or only a (mind)jogger? Perplexing paradoxical questions!

    I guess the question really is "are we separating the elites and near elites from the mid-to-rear pack or are we one big happy family?"
  • tappae
    tappae Posts: 568 Member
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    I know this isn't a popular opinion here, but I call myself a "jogger." Jogging is just slow running, right?

    When I started back running a few years ago, I read that most runners get injured every year. I decided it was safer to be a jogger. Then, I learned about heart rate training and slowed my easy runs down to what could only be called jogging.

    Now, I think of jogging as something slower than my easy pace (like a soccer player leaving the field, being subbed, while their team is ahead).

    Also, I run with a jogging stroller a fair bit. It's not a "running stroller." I know this because of that time I crushed the ball bearing assembly going down a steep hill and the other time that the wheel fell off 1.5 miles into my run.
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
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    I know this isn't a popular opinion here, but I call myself a "jogger." Jogging is just slow running, right?

    When I started back running a few years ago, I read that most runners get injured every year. I decided it was safer to be a jogger. Then, I learned about heart rate training and slowed my easy runs down to what could only be called jogging.

    Now, I think of jogging as something slower than my easy pace (like a soccer player leaving the field, being subbed, while their team is ahead).

    Also, I run with a jogging stroller a fair bit. It's not a "running stroller." I know this because of that time I crushed the ball bearing assembly going down a steep hill and the other time that the wheel fell off 1.5 miles into my run.

    Joggers are the ones that find all the dead bodies.

    LOL on your jogging stroller. And I can do that because I had to strong arm a double stroller two miles down a bike path.
  • jessspurr
    jessspurr Posts: 258 Member
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    JOGGING my memory to come up with an answer: Jogging seems derogatory and I'm not sure why--is it just a flashback/throwback to the foregone era of the 1970's when ALMOST everyone called it jogging? Is it my Dad's velour "jogging suits"? Are you a jogger? I'm not sure even what that means.

    Perhaps...jogging/joggers has grown and developed into running/runners for most of us. Yes, there are still joggers. But who are they? Jogging is like the grammatical equivalent of using the passive compared to active voice (running) to me.

    Running seems more active, serious (*sometimes-it's fun, too). Jogging seems more recreational (not always, though-what if you fall while jogging and get hurt?). But don't misconstrue me, some of running is recreational but some is metaphysical. Can we really say that about jogging intersecting with metaphysics? (unless a long-slow-distance run is jogging but I still call that running). What kind of endorphin rush do you get from running? What kind of endorphin rush do you get from jogging?

    Jogging seems shorter, fleeting, like jogging 800 meters to your car to escape a large crowd.

    If you are late for a connecting flight, do you run or jog? Running wins again!

    Maybe there is a place for jogging in the life of a runner, perhaps the days you "jog slowly"?

    I admit I might be biased in answering the question (my runblog is runninggrooveshark.com after all-- not "jogging" grooveshark).

    If you jog your memory for what you have forgotten while running, are you a jogger AND a runner? Or just a forgetful runner? Or only a (mind)jogger? Perplexing paradoxical questions!

    I guess the question really is "are we separating the elites and near elites from the mid-to-rear pack or are we one big happy family?"

    Good question. I also think that is what it comes down to. But do elite runners call other, non-elite runners "joggers"? My family used to call sweatpants "runninjoggins" - I thought that was actually a real word for sweatpants until like a year ago when I said it in front of someone who was like "WHAT?" and then I realized not everyone calls sweatpants "runninjoggins".
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
    Options
    JOGGING my memory to come up with an answer: Jogging seems derogatory and I'm not sure why--is it just a flashback/throwback to the foregone era of the 1970's when ALMOST everyone called it jogging? Is it my Dad's velour "jogging suits"? Are you a jogger? I'm not sure even what that means.

    Perhaps...jogging/joggers has grown and developed into running/runners for most of us. Yes, there are still joggers. But who are they? Jogging is like the grammatical equivalent of using the passive compared to active voice (running) to me.

    Running seems more active, serious (*sometimes-it's fun, too). Jogging seems more recreational (not always, though-what if you fall while jogging and get hurt?). But don't misconstrue me, some of running is recreational but some is metaphysical. Can we really say that about jogging intersecting with metaphysics? (unless a long-slow-distance run is jogging but I still call that running). What kind of endorphin rush do you get from running? What kind of endorphin rush do you get from jogging?

    Jogging seems shorter, fleeting, like jogging 800 meters to your car to escape a large crowd.

    If you are late for a connecting flight, do you run or jog? Running wins again!

    Maybe there is a place for jogging in the life of a runner, perhaps the days you "jog slowly"?

    I admit I might be biased in answering the question (my runblog is runninggrooveshark.com after all-- not "jogging" grooveshark).

    If you jog your memory for what you have forgotten while running, are you a jogger AND a runner? Or just a forgetful runner? Or only a (mind)jogger? Perplexing paradoxical questions!

    I guess the question really is "are we separating the elites and near elites from the mid-to-rear pack or are we one big happy family?"

    Good question. I also think that is what it comes down to. But do elite runners call other, non-elite runners "joggers"? My family used to call sweatpants "runninjoggins" - I thought that was actually a real word for sweatpants until like a year ago when I said it in front of someone who was like "WHAT?" and then I realized not everyone calls sweatpants "runninjoggins".

    Many elite runners have publicly embraced the big umbrella. However, knowing humans, some probably do even though they never seem to spout off about it.
  • Lachelleofthesea
    Lachelleofthesea Posts: 24 Member
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    JOGGING my memory to come up with an answer: Jogging seems derogatory and I'm not sure why--is it just a flashback/throwback to the foregone era of the 1970's when ALMOST everyone called it jogging? Is it my Dad's velour "jogging suits"? Are you a jogger? I'm not sure even what that means.

    Perhaps...jogging/joggers has grown and developed into running/runners for most of us. Yes, there are still joggers. But who are they? Jogging is like the grammatical equivalent of using the passive compared to active voice (running) to me.

    Running seems more active, serious (*sometimes-it's fun, too). Jogging seems more recreational (not always, though-what if you fall while jogging and get hurt?). But don't misconstrue me, some of running is recreational but some is metaphysical. Can we really say that about jogging intersecting with metaphysics? (unless a long-slow-distance run is jogging but I still call that running). What kind of endorphin rush do you get from running? What kind of endorphin rush do you get from jogging?

    Jogging seems shorter, fleeting, like jogging 800 meters to your car to escape a large crowd.

    If you are late for a connecting flight, do you run or jog? Running wins again!

    Maybe there is a place for jogging in the life of a runner, perhaps the days you "jog slowly"?

    I admit I might be biased in answering the question (my runblog is runninggrooveshark.com after all-- not "jogging" grooveshark).

    If you jog your memory for what you have forgotten while running, are you a jogger AND a runner? Or just a forgetful runner? Or only a (mind)jogger? Perplexing paradoxical questions!

    I guess the question really is "are we separating the elites and near elites from the mid-to-rear pack or are we one big happy family?"

    Good question. I also think that is what it comes down to. But do elite runners call other, non-elite runners "joggers"? My family used to call sweatpants "runninjoggins" - I thought that was actually a real word for sweatpants until like a year ago when I said it in front of someone who was like "WHAT?" and then I realized not everyone calls sweatpants "runninjoggins".
    I nearly died laughing at "runninjoggins"! I'm going to use that term the very first chance I get! :laugh: