I really screwed up my 26.2 training

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Hey people. Just posted this on my feed, but figured I'd share with a wider audience in the hopes of getting some advice or something.

So I've been pretty consistent over the year at ~200 miles monthly, with a couple of lower months due to me being a slacker. Did my first 26.2 last October and pulled a 3:50:17. I was working with a coach for a couple of months this year for a 3 month boost. Lots of speed and stamina work. While I think it definitely helped, my long runs have suffered horribly due to most Sundays being flat out with family obligations, vacation, and not having a lot of acceptance at home of the work I need to do. A lot of that is on me, I need to advocate for myself more and I own that issue.

Regardless, I've done pathetic distance work through much of July and August. I got in one 16 in July, and the next long I actually managed was 18 on Sunday. My next 26.2 on 10/19. I'm not worried about the distance, I'm pretty sure I can whip out a 26.2 without much issue, but I was really hoping to be able to come in somewhere around 3:40 or under. Unfortunately, that's probably a dream at this point. As such, I'm looking for any kind of guidance on what I could do for longs or intermediates over the next 3-4 weeks before the taper. I'm thinking going balls out and do 3x 20s and maybe a 22, with some tempo mixed in on the last 6-7 miles for maybe two of those. Any words of wisdom as to what the best bang for the buck is regarding training at this point to try to do ~10min+ better than 3:50:17.

I really let myself down here.

Thanks
pete

Replies

  • GillianMcK
    GillianMcK Posts: 401 Member
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    There was an article last week about long runs of 20 miles not necessarily being required and doing a long run of 15 miles, followed by another run of 8 miles the next day, produced the same muscle fatigue as 20 miles, it was only 1 article and I didn't look any further into it, but might be an idea to look at and also be slightly easier for you to fit in round family life.
  • GillianMcK
    GillianMcK Posts: 401 Member
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    Found it, I did put it the wrong way round in my post above!
    Long runs may not need to be that long, argue Luke Humphrey, Keith Hanson, and Kevin Hanson in their book, Hansons Marathon Method. Most marathon training programs include one or two 20-mile runs to physiologically and psychologically prepare runners for the long haul on race day. The authors believe that topping out at 16 miles may do the trick as long as there are other medium-long runs planned during the week. By pairing a 16-mile run with an eight-mile run the day before, a runner’s body is being trained to fight fatigue without the wear and tear associated with go-for-broke, hours-long runs. Along with speed, strength, and tempo workouts during the week, the authors have found that their runners recover faster and suffer fewer injuries.
  • DavidMartinez2
    DavidMartinez2 Posts: 840 Member
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    My faith in the "Hanson Method" dropped to near zero when I found out what they put in the book and what they have their athletes do are radically different. You also have to do the ENTIRE training plan to get the benefits of their plan, not just the skipping runs fo greater than 16 miles portion.

    Pete, I do not think cranking out three 20 mile runs in three weeks is a good idea. I think alternating something in the mid-to-high teens with a 20 (16-20-18-20-16) and taking away a week of taper will lead to a happier race day experience.
  • vmclach
    vmclach Posts: 670 Member
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    Pete, I do not think cranking out three 20 mile runs in three weeks is a good idea. I think alternating something in the mid-to-high teens with a 20 (16-20-18-20-16) and taking away a week of taper will lead to a happier race day experience.

    This. And no more of these "family excuses".. Seriously? Lol :-) but really. Wake up at 3am if you have to. Or run at 10pm.. It's literally 2.5-3 hours of time. I know you can get it done.

    Worst case senecio, call in "sick" take some "vacation".

    Stop whining ;-)
  • aldousmom
    aldousmom Posts: 382 Member
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    warning: I did not read any other replies. :D

    Your speed work is what's going to help you reach your goal, not your long runs. Sure it would be nice if they were longer, but it's not your first rodeo.

    CALM DOWN. stay with your quality workouts as scheduled (I'm assuming you continue speed work even in your taper week, at a reduced quantity)

    Really, if you get enough rest and keep as your going, you should be able to meet your goal. Don't try to do any super long runs past this upcoming weekend. Do what you can, then next week, taper as if you've been following your plan all along.