gastric sleve vrs rny

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pinupchick82
pinupchick82 Posts: 31 Member
hello i am new to the group, i am pre op woking through my phase one stuff hoping to move to phase 2 by end of sep. as of right now it i sort of up to me to decide withch tool would be best for me......i have already ruled out banding for several reasons....... so as of now i am between sleve and rny....at this moment i am leaning tword sleve....granted the surgon may have a stronger opinion after phase 2 testing but would really like to here othe people with exsperiances point of veiw?

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  • garber6th
    garber6th Posts: 1,894 Member
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    I chose to have sleeve surgery for several common reasons - I didn't want to deal with the malabsorption issues, I didn't want to have my insides rerouted, and I just felt it was a less invasive surgery overall. My surgeon agreed that the sleeve would be best for me, partly because of my weight. He said that for some people if they are too much overweight, it's actually more difficult to perform the gastric bypass or rny. He did say that at some point, if I wanted to I could do a revision to bypass or rny, so that is an option for some people. Just remember, whichever surgery you choose, you have to commit to the process and commit to making long term lifestyle changes. I can say this for sure - having the sleeve surgery was probably the best thing I have ever done for myself.
  • lkrenz0307
    lkrenz0307 Posts: 13 Member
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    I went with the RNY after researching and talking to the surgeon extensively. Ultimately I decided on it because it has a longer history of success and after hearing that sleeve patients go in to revise to RNY if sleeve isn't successful I decided I'd rather not have a second surgery and go with the old tried and true from the get go.
  • april731
    april731 Posts: 122 Member
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    I did a ton of research about RNY vs. sleeve, both anecdotal evidence from forums like this and reading scientific literature, and, although the sleeve has less long term data, the data for the sleeve vs. RNY is very promising. The biggest selling point of the sleeve, for me, was the ghrelin (hunger hormone) reduction. I knew that it wasn't guaranteed that I wouldn't be hungry, but I thought I would have a better shot at weight loss if I wasn't starving all the time. I'm almost 5 months out and have yet to experience any real hunger (although, head hunger can be a beast).

    In addition to the malabsorption and other reasons for getting the sleeve, another issue that hasn't been mentioned yet is that with RNY there is a larger possibility of long-term complications. Where the intestines were re-connected, there is a chance for obstructions due to twisting and a higher likelihood of intestinal ulcers (because of the open stoma at the bottom of the pouch; the intact pyloric sphincter with the sleeve reduces this likelihood to the same as a person that didn't have surgery). In addition, with RNY you are left with a blind, remnant stomach that can't be easily scoped in the event of an ulcer or cancer. Granted, these complications are all rare to very rare.

    All that said, almost everyone that has had either surgery is very happy with their choice, so either way I think you will be glad you had WLS. Having the sleeve is, hands down, the best decision I've ever made! Good luck!
  • csmccord
    csmccord Posts: 272 Member
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    I did a ton of research about RNY vs. sleeve, both anecdotal evidence from forums like this and reading scientific literature, and, although the sleeve has less long term data, the data for the sleeve vs. RNY is very promising. The biggest selling point of the sleeve, for me, was the ghrelin (hunger hormone) reduction. I knew that it wasn't guaranteed that I wouldn't be hungry, but I thought I would have a better shot at weight loss if I wasn't starving all the time. I'm almost 5 months out and have yet to experience any real hunger (although, head hunger can be a beast).

    In addition to the malabsorption and other reasons for getting the sleeve, another issue that hasn't been mentioned yet is that with RNY there is a larger possibility of long-term complications. Where the intestines were re-connected, there is a chance for obstructions due to twisting and a higher likelihood of intestinal ulcers (because of the open stoma at the bottom of the pouch; the intact pyloric sphincter with the sleeve reduces this likelihood to the same as a person that didn't have surgery). In addition, with RNY you are left with a blind, remnant stomach that can't be easily scoped in the event of an ulcer or cancer. Granted, these complications are all rare to very rare.

    All that said, almost everyone that has had either surgery is very happy with their choice, so either way I think you will be glad you had WLS. Having the sleeve is, hands down, the best decision I've ever made! Good luck!

    I had the RNY 2 years ago, and did much of the same research. Now that I have a knee injury, my pain is not managed as effectively due to not being able to take NSAIDS due to risk of ulcers. Tylenol sometimes just doesn't cut it. However, I will note that as far as the hunger hormone, the body always finds ways to adjust. Even with the RNY I was not hungry at all the first 6 months. I ate on a schedule. I'm still happy with my decision, however find that in some cases the sleeve is the better option.
  • katematt313
    katematt313 Posts: 624 Member
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    I did a ton of research about RNY vs. sleeve, both anecdotal evidence from forums like this and reading scientific literature, and, although the sleeve has less long term data, the data for the sleeve vs. RNY is very promising. The biggest selling point of the sleeve, for me, was the ghrelin (hunger hormone) reduction. I knew that it wasn't guaranteed that I wouldn't be hungry, but I thought I would have a better shot at weight loss if I wasn't starving all the time. I'm almost 5 months out and have yet to experience any real hunger (although, head hunger can be a beast).

    In addition to the malabsorption and other reasons for getting the sleeve, another issue that hasn't been mentioned yet is that with RNY there is a larger possibility of long-term complications. Where the intestines were re-connected, there is a chance for obstructions due to twisting and a higher likelihood of intestinal ulcers (because of the open stoma at the bottom of the pouch; the intact pyloric sphincter with the sleeve reduces this likelihood to the same as a person that didn't have surgery). In addition, with RNY you are left with a blind, remnant stomach that can't be easily scoped in the event of an ulcer or cancer. Granted, these complications are all rare to very rare.

    All that said, almost everyone that has had either surgery is very happy with their choice, so either way I think you will be glad you had WLS. Having the sleeve is, hands down, the best decision I've ever made! Good luck!

    I had the RNY 2 years ago, and did much of the same research. Now that I have a knee injury, my pain is not managed as effectively due to not being able to take NSAIDS due to risk of ulcers. Tylenol sometimes just doesn't cut it. However, I will note that as far as the hunger hormone, the body always finds ways to adjust. Even with the RNY I was not hungry at all the first 6 months. I ate on a schedule. I'm still happy with my decision, however find that in some cases the sleeve is the better option.

    You are not supposed to use NSAIDs after sleeve, either.
  • csmccord
    csmccord Posts: 272 Member
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    You are not supposed to use NSAIDs after sleeve, either.


    Good to know! I assumed you could since the GI tract was still intact. Must be because of the staple lines then.
  • pawoodhull
    pawoodhull Posts: 1,759 Member
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    I was sleeved 3 years ago and I was told by my doctor I could resume NSAIDs after 6 months. With my weight loss I am pain free 95% of the time, but I still have arthritis and for that 5% of the time I have pain, I take Aleve, etc for it without issue.

    I chose the sleeve because all it does is surgically reduce the size of the stomach by removing the stretchy part. It's that simple. No reroute, no disconnect, nothing left behind. Like others have said, I didn't want to deal with malabsorbtion issues, not being able to take certain meds for the rest of my life or have certain tests if needed for the rest of my life that go with RNY/bypass/my.

    I went into the decision making process convinced that the sleeve was the better surgery because all but one person I personally know who had bypass regained most if not all their weight. BUT, what I've learned here is that no matter what the surgery, success is really up to the person not the surgery. All of the WLSs will cause you to lose and lose fast initially. But there comes a point when to keep losing and to keep it off once you hit goal, is really all up to you. These surgeries are tools. Use the tool and you lose your excess weight. Keep using the tool and you keep the weight off.

    As for hunger, I was told no matter which surgery most people lose their hunger for the first year, then the body adjusts, finds a way to send out that hunger hormone and most of us get our hunger back. Not everyone gets it back though. For me, it's head hunger I battle. I'm rarely ever "hungry" but I frequently "want to eat". Huge difference. But again, this happens with all the surgeries. I don't think there's anything out there that guarantees no more hunger ever.

    Pat
  • rpyle111
    rpyle111 Posts: 1,066 Member
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    I am still pre-op and am scheduled for the sleeve. I chose it primarily because of the retention of the sphincter at he bottom of the stomach, the lack of rerouting and the hormonal impacts.

    The main negative of the Sleeve is the data which shows a larger weight loss with RnY. After I started the pre surgery plan I became confident that I will be able to change my habits in a way tha wil be able to make up the difference with exercise and good eating. Seeing the results from some here, I feel very confident in my decision and it has inspired me to be very diligent in here pre surgery phase (nowhere near perfect, but pretty darn good!).

    I think that if you have a good surgery program they will help you with the decision and you will be successful. I am on the slow boat to surgery, but have use the extra time to try to ingrain the behaviors that I will need on Horne other side. Use your pre surgery time to become the person you want to be after surgery!

    Rob
  • adiggs2777
    adiggs2777 Posts: 111 Member
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    I'm a sleever. I chose it because I liked the idea of not having to reroute all the business down there. I also wasn't cool with malabsorption. And if I ever need to be scoped again, the path is clear. Unfortunately for me I have had hunger since about a month after my surgery, though, not the ravenous hunger I had before it. I used my pre-op program to work on my brain mentally to just suck it up and deal with it. Ultimately go with your gut. Each surgery has its pros and cons. And for every person like myself who had no issues post surgery, there is someone else who had all kinds of complications - for both surgeries.
  • pinupchick82
    pinupchick82 Posts: 31 Member
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    thank you all for imput...i am going thru the tri care program and there is a bit to do i do feel its a good program we shall see in time what i choose.....i am hoping to move to phase 2 by end of september and have surg late oct or early nov
  • dpaq45
    dpaq45 Posts: 4 Member
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    Pat - Thank you for your insight - it is very helpful. Diane
  • Dannadl
    Dannadl Posts: 120 Member
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    I had RNY 3/2012. At the time that I researched and had my surgery there the sleeve was still relatively new. It seemed that the band had the lowest success rate and highest rate of complications. The sleeve was new and there simply weren't the studies to back up its efficacy. RNY was the gold standard in bariatric surgeries, with the lowest complication rate, highest long term success rate and lowest mortality rate.

    I've been happy with my decision. I've lost 180lbs. I'd like to lose 30-40 more. I've had no complications or issues at all.
  • asia1967
    asia1967 Posts: 707 Member
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    You are not supposed to use NSAIDs after sleeve, either.


    Good to know! I assumed you could since the GI tract was still intact. Must be because of the staple lines then.

    Never heard that about the NSAIDS. That is one of the main reasons why I got the sleeve so that I could continue to use my NSAIDS because I have severe arthritis. The sleeve was relatively new and not performed often when I had mine done.
  • dsjsmom23
    dsjsmom23 Posts: 234 Member
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    You are not supposed to use NSAIDs after sleeve, either.


    Good to know! I assumed you could since the GI tract was still intact. Must be because of the staple lines then.

    Never heard that about the NSAIDS. That is one of the main reasons why I got the sleeve so that I could continue to use my NSAIDS because I have severe arthritis. The sleeve was relatively new and not performed often when I had mine done.

    My surgeon allows NSAIDS after surgery, but it depends on why you need them. Severe arthritis? He will allow it.
    Most of the people in my program chose sleeve because of this.

    I take naproxen for severe menstrual cramps. My surgeon first told me he would prefer I didn't take it, but when I explained I take maybe 1 or 2 per month, he was fine with it.
  • katematt313
    katematt313 Posts: 624 Member
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    You are not supposed to use NSAIDs after sleeve, either.


    Good to know! I assumed you could since the GI tract was still intact. Must be because of the staple lines then.

    Never heard that about the NSAIDS. That is one of the main reasons why I got the sleeve so that I could continue to use my NSAIDS because I have severe arthritis. The sleeve was relatively new and not performed often when I had mine done.

    My surgeon allows NSAIDS after surgery, but it depends on why you need them. Severe arthritis? He will allow it.
    Most of the people in my program chose sleeve because of this.

    I take naproxen for severe menstrual cramps. My surgeon first told me he would prefer I didn't take it, but when I explained I take maybe 1 or 2 per month, he was fine with it.


    I can only report what I was instructed to avoid. :)

    That being said, I am only 10 weeks out, so the restrictions may change in the future.
  • ericadouglas0412
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    I'm in Canada, and the way that the doctor's do it here is that RNY is the standard and the one they aim for, you only really get the sleeve if there is some specific reason to (you have specific medications that need to be absorbed differently, have previously had surgery on your digestive tract, etc). It also depends how much you need to loose, and what secondary issues you have like diabetes.
    They treat the RNY as the standard here because they've seen more long-term success with it as far as keeping weight off once you get to the goal weight. SO I didn't really have a choice if I wanted to get it done here, it was RNY for me. But I am happy I went with that, because it has been working well for me and has really forced me to change a lot of habits that I don't think I would have noticed so much with the sleeve.
  • itsdreday
    itsdreday Posts: 60 Member
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    You are not supposed to use NSAIDs after sleeve, either.


    Good to know! I assumed you could since the GI tract was still intact. Must be because of the staple lines then.

    Never heard that about the NSAIDS. That is one of the main reasons why I got the sleeve so that I could continue to use my NSAIDS because I have severe arthritis. The sleeve was relatively new and not performed often when I had mine done.

    My surgeon allows NSAIDS after surgery, but it depends on why you need them. Severe arthritis? He will allow it.
    Most of the people in my program chose sleeve because of this.

    I take naproxen for severe menstrual cramps. My surgeon first told me he would prefer I didn't take it, but when I explained I take maybe 1 or 2 per month, he was fine with it.


    I can only report what I was instructed to avoid. :)

    That being said, I am only 10 weeks out, so the restrictions may change in the future.

    NSAIDS were a big deal to me too so I chose the sleeve.

    6mo out it's great, but as others have said, it's up to you. I have an ex who had the RNY and lost a significant amount of weight initially but never exercised and continually ate past the point of pain and discomfort most meals. Slowly but surely it all came back 1oz at a time. None are a magic bullet, but the consensus seems to be "anything but the lap-band".
  • grace20072010
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    I didn't have a choice. I was revised from lap band to RNY and my surgeon wouldn't do the sleeve. The lap band caused esophageal spasms and horrible reflux and the sleeve would have exacerbated the acid reflux even more. Had I been given a choice, after my disastrous experience with the band, I still would have done the RNY. The sleeve is kind of like the band and I had so many problems there was no way I was changing to something that had so many similarities.
  • brendanewstart2014
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    I chose the sleeve for these reasons: no dumping, better absorption of nutrients, no rerouting of guts, and the gherelin producing part is gone, so hopefully no hunger. I am 5 days out, and still happy with my choice. The downside of 5-10% less weight loss is there, but I believe these are just averages, which tells me I can work hard and still lose tremendous weight.