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Did you tell your doctor you were doing LCHF/Keto etc

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  • LowCarbInScotlandLowCarbInScotland Member Posts: 1,027 Member Member Posts: 1,027 Member
    I just moved and had to change docs, she didn't ask about my diet,so I didn't tell. I did share with my diabetic nurse that I was taking a lot less insulin, though I didn't tell her how much less exactly because I didn't want to lose my prescription for test strips. She didn't ask why, but I volunteered that it was due to diet, she asked how I was eating, I said ketogenic, she said, "huh?" so I just said low carb. But I did share a few days of my menu with her and she was happy with it, but honestly, I didn't get the feeling that any of them cared anyway. I miss my doc in the US. We have a Skype appt quarterly because I want a medical professional in my life who knows me and cares about me. I'm very honest with him, we review my test results done here and he's very supportive and pleased with my success, but then he's a very forward thinking doc, hence the willingness to Skype with me.
  • lisawinning4losinglisawinning4losing Member Posts: 732 Member Member Posts: 732 Member
    I'm impressed by how many people in here have used keto/hflc to overcome medical conditions. I'm also here for my health and well being just as much as losing weight.
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Member Posts: 8,148 Member Member Posts: 8,148 Member
    RalfLott wrote: »
    I have been thinking about this since I am doctor shopping.

    Keep in mind a few of us can have really screwed up blood work even for the first year if we are dropping weight. Others eating LCHF do not have this temporary crazy blood work results.

    Uh-oh, that's news to me.. Do you have a good source of info on TCBW syndrome?

    Thanks!

    Dan put me on to Keto Clarity a book by Moore that explained it well.
  • DragonwolfDragonwolf Member Posts: 5,631 Member Member Posts: 5,631 Member
    I went in for a blood test today. Thyroid function and pregnancy were the things she was looking for.

    I told her about my messed up menstrual cycle and told her that I changed my diet. I didn't say LCHF in particular but she just brushed it off as "oh that won't effect it"...which I found a bit weird because as many people have posted in this forum before, Keto does mess with your menstrual cycle.

    When you really dig into it, it's astounding how much the medical industry have historically denied the effects of diet on just about everything. The fact that these same doctors are often so quick to prescribe pills makes the cognitive dissonance that much more mind-boggling.
    Hello everyone,
    I have a doctors appointment tomorrow and I've lost some weight since the last time I was there so I'm sure my doctor will be curious about what I've changed. I've had my blood work done maybe a year ago with no problems. I'm 27. Not sure if that means she'll do blood work again this time. But I'm just curious how your doctor reacted to LCHF?

    I've had mixed results with doctors, and have found that the specialists have a better understanding of LCHF/keto and are more receptive to it, though my situation is complicated by the fact that my "results" are sporadic and kludgy thanks to PCOS, so I don't have the "I lost 100lbs eating this way" elephant in the room (yet). I do have superb bloodwork, though, including improving PCOS markers, so the doctors that see that can't really argue. My Endo is actually quite on board with it, because it's having positive effects, and her son has even been following keto since joining the Columbus Crew (professional soccer team, the trainer has the whole team on keto)!

    One thing I've found to be a decent indicator of receptiveness is what their patient load looks like -- Do you see the doctor for less than 5 minutes? Does the time with the doctor feel rushed? Is the waiting room crowded for the number of doctors in the practice? These are indicators that the doctor is running on volume, which makes them less likely to be keeping up with the latest research and changes in things like dietary information, and less receptive to an alternative way of eating like LCHF or any real discussion on it. If, however, they focus more on quality and spend more time with each patient, they may be more open to dialog about LCHF.
  • DittoDanDittoDan Member Posts: 1,850 Member Member Posts: 1,850 Member
    Both my endo and family doc gave me high 5's when they saw the results of my weight loss and blood work.

    Then, I went to them for about 6 months after that. Then I quit going to them every 3 months (I'm diabetic). I feel so good now and my blood glucose levels are normal, that I don't need to pay a $30 copay x two doctors every 3 months for them to say, "Keep doing what you're doing".

    So, I only go to them when something goes wrong, nothing has yet, except a small calcium deposit on the side of my foot. It doesn't hurt, so I am reluctant to go see them.

    I hope this helps,
    Dan the Man from Michigan
    Keto / The Recipe Water Fasting / E.A.S.Y. Exercise Program
    v1bk0hqkhxv5.jpg
  • T1DCarnivoreRunnerT1DCarnivoreRunner Member Posts: 11,366 Member Member Posts: 11,366 Member
    I have both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and have struggled with weight loss from the beginning. My endocrinologist is always happy with the meager losses I've shown, but I'm not. Last time I saw him, I complained (again) about how little I lose. He explained (again) about how taking insulin makes it hard to lose weight (it is a bit more complicated than that, but I understand what he is trying to say). So I said maybe I should take Symlin to cut insulin, and that I would cut carbs to cut insulin too (I will always need to take some insulin even when I eat nothing, but more carbs means more insulin). He was fine with that, and wrote a prescription for the Symlin. I suggested that it would help stabilize BG's and we would see if it had any effect on weight loss.

    I also asked about low carb and Symlin, and we decided to only take it if I eat more than 30g of carbs at a time. I've only taken it a couple times and that was a month ago. One time I should have and was at work without the pen with me (32g of carbs for a meal, so barely over), and a couple times I was treating a low, so it would have been a bad idea to take the Symlin.
  • slimzandraslimzandra Member Posts: 966 Member Member Posts: 966 Member
    Yes. I told both Primary Care and Ob/Gyn I've been doing LCHF. Both gave me a thumbs up.
  • 60to3560to35 Member Posts: 297 Member Member Posts: 297 Member
    My doctor had a heart attack last year. He was in great shape- a former ultra marathoner. When he recovered he switched to LCHF. He talked to me about it and said he gets to eat way better stuff now- "What's better than sausage and eggs for breakfast?" Glad he told me- it's changed my life.
  • T1DCarnivoreRunnerT1DCarnivoreRunner Member Posts: 11,366 Member Member Posts: 11,366 Member
    60to35 wrote: »
    My doctor had a heart attack last year. He was in great shape- a former ultra marathoner. When he recovered he switched to LCHF. He talked to me about it and said he gets to eat way better stuff now- "What's better than sausage and eggs for breakfast?" Glad he told me- it's changed my life.

    LOL

    That reminds me of a conversation I had last year, well before I started low carb. I was hiking in a large national park, woke up and ate some oatmeal for breakfast before hiking out. The plan was to hike out of the park that morning and drive on to another destination that evening. Anyway, it was only a few miles to the trailhead, and it took a little longer than it should have (there was a wildlife-related delay), but it still wasn't even 10am before I get to the trailhead. I was quote hungry and really wanted some sausage, eggs, and bacon... I had a craving for meat and fat.

    Well, there is this tiny little town on the edge of the park and they clearly rely on tourism to this park because they even had an "information center" for the town (it couldn't have been more than 1,000-2,000 residents). So it opened at 10am, and I got there right as they were opening. So I asked for a place where I could get brunch, specifically asking for "a place that has sausages and bacon and eggs... you know, the good stuff." I can't forget the guy's reaction... "Awwwww yeeeeaaaahhhh...... you gots to have the good stuff!" (I don't remember all of our exact words, but we definitely understood each other's sentiment.
  • DorkothyParkerDorkothyParker Member Posts: 618 Member Member Posts: 618 Member
    I've always just used quick clinics when sick. What does a primary care physician do? How do you find one? My family never had a family doctor before even when I was a kid. I have a gyno from my pregnancy, but I don't get the primary care stuff.

    My work does annual testing of blood and stuff and I've always been super awesome so not totally stressed on it, but thinking it's a good idea to get a doctor for my husband and I. (Kiddo has a great pediatrician, I wish she was my doctor!)
  • mao1962mao1962 Member Posts: 33 Member Member Posts: 33 Member
    macchiatto wrote: »
    mao1962 wrote: »
    Low carb was suggested to us by my husband's cardiologist, and my rheumatologist is very supportive as well.

    I'm curious; what cardiology issues does your husband have?

    The hub has 2 stents as well as a history of pulmonary embolism. After his second stent was placed within 18 months of his first one, his doc gave us a very stern talking to. His doc wanted him to do " nutritional rehabilitation ". Turns out it was a low carb WOE, limiting carbs to less than 20 grams a day. He is also on Metformin and Saxenda. He is not diabetic.
    It's interesting that this goes against everything he learned in cardiac rehab.
  • V_Keto_VV_Keto_V Member Posts: 342 Member Member Posts: 342 Member
    Yes, informed Dr. Of keto...looking at the lab results before physically seeing me appearance wise all tall and lanky. Sure answered why cholesterol was high yet triglycerides were almost abnormally low, why blood glucose was borderline hypoglycemic and the obvious ketone (only +) in my urine. No deception
  • PhrickPhrick Member Posts: 2,765 Member Member Posts: 2,765 Member
    I've always just used quick clinics when sick. What does a primary care physician do? How do you find one? My family never had a family doctor before even when I was a kid. I have a gyno from my pregnancy, but I don't get the primary care stuff.

    My work does annual testing of blood and stuff and I've always been super awesome so not totally stressed on it, but thinking it's a good idea to get a doctor for my husband and I. (Kiddo has a great pediatrician, I wish she was my doctor!)

    All the stuff your kid's pediatrician does for her, a primary care doc would do for you and your husband - stuff like following any chronic conditions; seeing you for well visits if you wanted, seeing you for minor injuries or sick visits, writing prescriptions, and so on - and usually the copay for a primary doc is WAY less than the copay for quick clinics or urgent care!! (for example when we had insurance an office visit copay was $15 per visit - Urgent Care copay was $50 per!)
    edited April 2016
  • macchiattomacchiatto Member Posts: 2,888 Member Member Posts: 2,888 Member
    mao1962 wrote: »
    macchiatto wrote: »
    mao1962 wrote: »
    Low carb was suggested to us by my husband's cardiologist, and my rheumatologist is very supportive as well.

    I'm curious; what cardiology issues does your husband have?

    The hub has 2 stents as well as a history of pulmonary embolism. After his second stent was placed within 18 months of his first one, his doc gave us a very stern talking to. His doc wanted him to do " nutritional rehabilitation ". Turns out it was a low carb WOE, limiting carbs to less than 20 grams a day. He is also on Metformin and Saxenda. He is not diabetic.
    It's interesting that this goes against everything he learned in cardiac rehab.

    Thank you! That is definitely interesting. My husband had 3 major blockages (all discovered at once) and ended up with four heart caths/CTO's and five stents. He also has extremely low HDL (genetic), so a poor ratio even though his total cholesterol is low, and borderline high BP. I keep wondering if LCHF would actually be better for him than what he was taught in cardiac rehab so I am intrigued there's a cardiologist out there who is recommending it. You're not by any chance in SC are you? ;)
  • macchiattomacchiatto Member Posts: 2,888 Member Member Posts: 2,888 Member
    Phrick wrote: »
    I've always just used quick clinics when sick. What does a primary care physician do? How do you find one? My family never had a family doctor before even when I was a kid. I have a gyno from my pregnancy, but I don't get the primary care stuff.

    My work does annual testing of blood and stuff and I've always been super awesome so not totally stressed on it, but thinking it's a good idea to get a doctor for my husband and I. (Kiddo has a great pediatrician, I wish she was my doctor!)

    All the stuff your kid's pediatrician does for her, a primary care doc would do for you and your husband - stuff like following any chronic conditions; seeing you for well visits if you wanted, seeing you for minor injuries or sick visits, writing prescriptions, and so on - and usually the copay for a primary doc is WAY less than the copay for quick clinics or urgent care!! (for example when we had insurance an office visit copay was $15 per visit - Urgent Care copay was $50 per!)

    Yes. (And DH and I can relate to wishing our kids' pediatrician could be our dr, too ;)). I never had a primary care dr until about 5 years ago. I love having one because (a) they can follow me to make sure I don't develop the diabetes I'm at high risk for genetically, (b) they can catch other issues before they become a problem and (c) it's helpful to have someone who knows your history even if you're just being seen for a UTI, flu swab, etc. Or if you have something recurring like a UTI or YI that you're familiar with, sometimes they're willing to just call you in a Rx without you having to go in.

    Plus I don't know about you but the "quick" clinics and urgent cares around here often have long waits and huge germy waiting rooms. ;) I had two PCP's in a row move unexpectedly so I've been without a PCP for a couple of long stretches and I missed having one!
  • macchiattomacchiatto Member Posts: 2,888 Member Member Posts: 2,888 Member
    Oh and we ask around for recs when looking for a PCP. In recent years we've had an ins co that is huge, especially around here, so finding one who takes our insurance hasn't been a problem. (Our dental insurance is another story. :tongue: )
    edited April 2016
  • SamandaIndiaSamandaIndia Member Posts: 1,577 Member Member Posts: 1,577 Member
    @DorkothyParker like you I have seen a variety of doctors, so unless I track it, no one individual would know my medical history. Mum went to the same family doctor for 30 years. Like seeing an old friend who knows you. If complex issues occur who is the primary medical professional avting as coordinator/ project manager. in our cases the answer is we own that job.
  • Lillith32Lillith32 Member, Premium Posts: 483 Member Member, Premium Posts: 483 Member
    I don't trust or like doctors, so I tell them as little as possible. In general, I avoid going to see them at all costs, so it works out for me. Everyone else who asks, I tell I've cut down on sugar and processed food.
  • kmn118kmn118 Member Posts: 313 Member Member Posts: 313 Member
    mao1962 wrote: »
    macchiatto wrote: »
    mao1962 wrote: »
    Low carb was suggested to us by my husband's cardiologist, and my rheumatologist is very supportive as well.

    I'm curious; what cardiology issues does your husband have?

    The hub has 2 stents as well as a history of pulmonary embolism. After his second stent was placed within 18 months of his first one, his doc gave us a very stern talking to. His doc wanted him to do " nutritional rehabilitation ". Turns out it was a low carb WOE, limiting carbs to less than 20 grams a day. He is also on Metformin and Saxenda. He is not diabetic.
    It's interesting that this goes against everything he learned in cardiac rehab.

    I am diabetic and had a heart "event" that required 4 stents just over a year ago. In the hospital, they put me on insulin and follow-up care told me i should stay on insulin. During cardiac rehab, the diabetic nutritionist told me to eat at least 164g of carbs a day!!! Double whammy with the carbs and insulin! I have gained 25 lbs since i followed that regimen. However, 2 days ago started HFLC and dropped 8 lbs of water weight, plus feel more energetic and less achy already. So, will continue this new regimen for a while to see how it works!
  • RalfLottRalfLott Member Posts: 5,056 Member Member Posts: 5,056 Member
    kmn118 wrote: »

    I am diabetic and had a heart "event" that required 4 stents just over a year ago. In the hospital, they put me on insulin and follow-up care told me i should stay on insulin. During cardiac rehab, the diabetic nutritionist told me to eat at least 164g of carbs a day!!! Double whammy with the carbs and insulin! I have gained 25 lbs since I followed that regimen. However, 2 days ago started HFLC and dropped 8 lbs of water weight, plus feel more energetic and less achy already. So, will continue this new regimen for a while to see how it works!


    Congrats on being your own best doctor - that is perfectly appalling advice!

    You might consider nominating it as a candidate for the Diabetic Diet Misinformation Darwin Award...

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