Carb question

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MKknits
MKknits Posts: 184 Member
Why do some brands of eggs have carbs and some brands of eggs do not? When I read the nutritional information on the large cage free eggs I buy it says 1 carb for each egg, when I read the nutritional information on the regular eggs I buy it says no carbs. I'm perplexed -the eggs are the same size.

I'm really curious because if all cage free organic fancy pants eggs have 1 carb an egg, and all of the regular eggs have no carbs even though they are better for me I'll buy the regular eggs. Also because we buy eggs from a friend often and I'm wondering if I should just assume those all have 1 carb in each of them.

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  • KnitOrMiss
    KnitOrMiss Posts: 10,104 Member
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    Basically, this is the same as with things like heavy cream. Nutritional labeling requirements allow for rounding up or down, at will. Also, they allow manufacturers to dramatically reduce portion sizes to give a better "read" on the label. Add to that that laws allow 20-25% discrepancies, and it's a mess.

    Basically, you want to check a site like FatSecret or USDA for true data.

    Fat Secret is the one I use more often because it is easy to read and adjust.

    Eggs have 0.5-0.6 carbs each.

    Heavy cream has 6.4 carbs per CUP, so 0.4 carbs per TBSP.

    But because those numbers are close, they can round down to make their product look better.


    I personally feel that farm fresh eggs are generally better quality, because regular egg-laying chickens are raised in less than stellar conditions.
  • KnitOrMiss
    KnitOrMiss Posts: 10,104 Member
    edited November 2016
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    Oh, and to add to that, @MKknits - I don't sweat the carbs in eggs, even when I was HARD CORE keto at 20 grams a day PERIOD... They are not going to affect you the same as say 4-5 grams from strawberries or potatoes or whatever... That is why people do egg/fat fasts and NEVER GET KICKED OUT OF KETO...

    Nutrition trumps carbs (in my book, mind you) EVERY SINGLE BLOODY TIME. Nutrition trumps calories, too, in my book. Passing up good true nutrition to meet a macro (again, IMO) is pure lunacy.

    Simply nutritional quality check? The darker the yolk, the more nutrients it holds.

    modernstead.com/store-eggs-vs-farm-eggs/

    hobbyfarms.com/store-bought-eggs-vs-farm-fresh-eggs-4/

    hcsummers.com/blog/27788/difference-between-store-bought-eggs-and-fresh-farm-eggs
  • MKknits
    MKknits Posts: 184 Member
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    Good cause I love eggs :)

    I almost always get fresh eggs from a friend (due to a number of issues we gave them our flock of 20 birds so they give us eggs whenever I stop by to see my ladies and 1 very well behaved gentlemen - I really miss my chickens), but when I have to buy them we eat so many as a family that sometimes the cage free blah blah blah eggs are just out of my price range (here free range, cage free, organic eggs are about $6.50 a dozen - I can get 18 eggs for 2.40, when as a family we go through 3-4 dozen that is a HUGE difference.
  • KnitOrMiss
    KnitOrMiss Posts: 10,104 Member
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    @MKknits - if you have an Aldi's near you, the quality is as good as any supermarket eggs, and they're usually less than $1 per dozen. I've seen them as low as $0.39 per dozen on special. I do this all the time. If I do get organic what's-its eggs, I be sure to use those for frying, and I use the cheaper ones for hard-boiling and scrambling, where quality can be covered up...
  • KnitOrMiss
    KnitOrMiss Posts: 10,104 Member
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    Eggs are also considered to be one of the only "whole animal" nutrition sources we still consume. I'm thrilled to know your whole family eats lots of eggs! Yolks have so much food nutrients we need!
  • DietPrada
    DietPrada Posts: 1,171 Member
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    All eggs have carbs, but it's less than 1g - it's only the labelling that differs, not the actual carb content of the eggs.
  • MKknits
    MKknits Posts: 184 Member
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    Each of my girls usually had one hard boiled egg a day and I usually eat at least 3 a day (sometimes 1-2 more if I make a few deviled eggs if my macros need a boost). So a dozen lasts us 2 days.
  • ccrdragon
    ccrdragon Posts: 3,366 Member
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    KnitOrMiss wrote: »
    @MKknits - if you have an Aldi's near you, the quality is as good as any supermarket eggs, and they're usually less than $1 per dozen. I've seen them as low as $0.39 per dozen on special. I do this all the time. If I do get organic what's-its eggs, I be sure to use those for frying, and I use the cheaper ones for hard-boiling and scrambling, where quality can be covered up...

    WinCO is also a good source - the one near our house routinely has eggs for $0.69 a dozen as their regular price.
  • kmn118
    kmn118 Posts: 313 Member
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    Another carb question... before this WOE, I craved sweets and bread. Lately, I have found myself craving (mouth-watering, can't think of anything else) green beans, braised cabbage and onions, okra fried with almond flour, roasted brussel sprouts, well you get the picture! I wonder if there's a supplement I am missing or wth is going on?
  • KnitOrMiss
    KnitOrMiss Posts: 10,104 Member
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    Most of those are greens or related to. I'll go McGoogle and see if there is anything suggested.
  • KnitOrMiss
    KnitOrMiss Posts: 10,104 Member
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    @kmn118 - Well, they all seem to have similar fiber content...

    Vegetables with Four Fiber Grams
    Brussels Sprouts (Brussels Sprouts Recipes)
    Cabbage, Savoy (Cabbage Recipes)
    Edamame (1/2 cup) (Edamame Recipes)
    Eggplant (Eggplant Recipes)
    Endive (Endive Recipes)
    Fennel (Fennel Recipes)
    Green Beans (Green Bean Recipes)
    Kohlrabi (Kohlrabi Recipes)
    Okra (Okra Recipes)
    • Brussels Sprouts: provide vitamins C and A, folic acid, potassium, fiber and protein.
    • Cabbage provides fiber, vitamins A, C and K, folate, potassium, manganese, B6, thiamin, calcium, iron and magnesium.
    • Fresh beans are not as nutritionally dense as dried beans, but they do offer some vitamin C, folate and iron. Beans that are deep green in color also have beta-carotene.
    • Okra is a good source of vitamin C, lutein, magnesium, and potassium. It's also high in fiber.
    • Onions are a rich source of phytochemicals that may promote healthy blood pressure and cholesterol levels. They are also a source of vitamin C, fiber, vitamin B6, folate and manganese. Green onions and scallions are more nutritious than other types; their green tops have higher amounts of vitamin C, folate, calcium and beta-carotene than regular onions.

    Lots of overlap - particularly C and folate...

    Maybe, too, that you seem to be roasting or caramelizing most of them? Getting a crunchy punch of natural sweetness? Do you cook them all in cast iron by any chance??
  • kmn118
    kmn118 Posts: 313 Member
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    @KnitOrMiss I think you have hit it out of the park! It's the crunch and the sweetness... except the roasted brussel sprouts, which taste like chips to me. Thank you for that great information.