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Reducing Stew in a Slow Cooker?

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norcogrrl
norcogrrl Posts: 129 Member
edited December 2015 in Social Groups
Does anyone have any tips for reducing stew in a slow cooker? I'd like to "reduce" instead of "thicken," as I don't consume starches (cauliflower is the starchiest thing I consume . . . which is pretty non-starchy) or grains of any kind.

The slow cooker I'm using is a basic analogue one, with "high," "low," and "warm" settings.

Replies

  • norcogrrl
    norcogrrl Posts: 129 Member
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    I've opted to move it into a pot to simmer. Since I need the slow cooker for beef stock anyway. :)
  • Akimajuktuq
    Akimajuktuq Posts: 3,037 Member
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    I don't thicken either, so stove top, or even just put in less water starting out. Seems many foods create their own water during cooking so I've often added to much in the beginning.
  • annk18
    annk18 Posts: 85 Member
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    I only use a 1/2 cup of added liquid, but I leave jn all the vegetables and blend it all till smooth. I sometimes have to add aditional liquid to get a gravy feeling. But it is a rich full feeling
  • JinksE21
    JinksE21 Posts: 77 Member
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    Once cooked in the slow cooker, take the lid off and turn it up to high to allow some of the liquid to evaporate and concentrate the flavor until it's to your liking. I would stir occasionally as well to make sure things don't stick to the crock. If you are worried about over-cooking the veggies, take them out and add back in afterwards.
  • mccraee
    mccraee Posts: 199 Member
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    when my kids were little I could get them to eat more veggies by taking some of the stew or pot roast veggies, grinding them up and them putting back into the gravy. Cooked carrots, celery and onions make a tasty gravy and I still do that sometimes because they will eat anything, as long as it's gravy. I use a immersion blender but any blender or food processor would work
  • JinksE21
    JinksE21 Posts: 77 Member
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    mccraee wrote: »
    when my kids were little I could get them to eat more veggies by taking some of the stew or pot roast veggies, grinding them up and them putting back into the gravy. Cooked carrots, celery and onions make a tasty gravy and I still do that sometimes because they will eat anything, as long as it's gravy. I use a immersion blender but any blender or food processor would work

    I actually made my Thanksgiving gravy doing something very similar except I cooked carrots and onions with the giblets, neck, etc. from the turkey. once it was all cooked and flavorful, after adding salt, pepper, and thyme, I took out the turkey bits then used my immersion blender. Once blended, I did add an approved thickener (can't recall what it was right now) as well as some chopped up turkey. No one could even tell the difference!
  • norcogrrl
    norcogrrl Posts: 129 Member
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    Thanks for the great ideas! :)

    I need to pick up a smaller slow-cooker. I added too much water as I was worried about the slow-cooker being too empty.
  • monkeydharma
    monkeydharma Posts: 599 Member
    edited December 2015
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    I never add liquid when I crockpot (except maybe a splash of wine). I chop an onion and use it as a bed for whatever meat I'm cooking. The onion provides all the moisture necessary. When done, pan juices and what's left of the onion get blended into a gravy. Crocked veggies are too mushy for my tastes, so they are either raw or steamed/sauteed/roasted.