"The End of Overeating, Taking Control of the Insatiable North American Appetite"

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kpk54
kpk54 Posts: 4,474 Member
edited February 2018 in Social Groups
That's a book by Dr. David A. Kessler. Not new. 2012 as I recall. With current discussion in the forum, I thought this might be helpful to some. He has many YouTube videos. They're fairly repetitious with his "talking points" (meaning that as a positive) since that is what speakers do to highlight/reinforce/explain vast topics in a short time frame.

Some of his talking points (as I perceive them) are:
1) The ineffectiveness of willpower
2) Conditioned behaviors regarding foods and eating
3) The social acceptability of eating
4) The synergism created with "taste combinations" (salt, fat, sugar)
5) The Supersizing of America
6) Chronic eating though not hungry. Do we want to be fat? No. Why then, do we OVER eat?
7) The CHANGING of the SOCIAL NORM
8) The role of food manufacturers/suppliers
9) The value of REAL food
10) LEARNING, MEMORY, HABIT, MOTIVATION.

I didn't care for his efforts when he was Chair of the FDA in the 1990s because I was employed in the tobacco industry... and one of his biggest efforts was anti-smoking /anti-tobacco. He was successful wasn't he? Yes. And who among us would say that the human population's health has suffered with decreased tobacco use? That's another topic. He's since moved on to the fattening of the American population.

Take a look at the video. Discuss if so inclined. As an ex behavior therapist, his talks speak volumes to me but it is interesting how "hard" it was to recognize then embrace some of his concepts in regards to my personal habit of over eating. Between Kessler and Guyenet (The Hungry Brain) I finally got my needed focus. I'm still bombarded with food cues. They are EVERYWHERE in my environment. I choose my reaction to those food cues and win, most of the time. ;) The video will not appeal to all. Hope it turns on a light for someone.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OqJhbSeUI8
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Replies

  • mmultanen
    mmultanen Posts: 1,029 Member
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    I worked for a behavioral therapist as a researcher while in grad school and then for a few years post school. I find Kessler super interesting and his discussion of disrupting the neural pathways is super interesting. I have many "cues" that have developed over the years that take constant monitoring to disrupt!
  • GaleHawkins
    GaleHawkins Posts: 8,160 Member
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    Thanks for sharing this video that moves beyond just the calorie aspect of over eating. We must learn WHY so we can address the root issues we over eat.
  • baconslave
    baconslave Posts: 6,956 Member
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    Watch it. He's spot on.
  • kpk54
    kpk54 Posts: 4,474 Member
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    It's interesting, the awareness that is created, (tapping onto @tcunbeliever's comment above). During weight loss and the couple years following I really never paid attention to eating frequency for myself or others. Enter 2016 and the year I trialed Keto and have continued to eat LCHF, I became overly aware of both my eating habits and the habits of others regarding frequency. I attribute this to my lack of hunger and attention to not eating when not hungry.

    I've used golf excursions/vacations as an example before. Eat a big breakfast in prep for the long day. Pack snacks for the course "for energy". Bad shot. Eat a snack. Great shot. Celebrate with a snack. Grab something to eat at the turn. Cue of the "Halfway House" and general habit. Snack and drinks afterwards at the clubhouse. Cuz that's what we do. Routine. Return home and freshen up. Begin eating a smorgasboard of appetizers pre-dinner. Eat dinner. Stuffed. Sit around and play a few board games, cards, etc. Have some dessert. Go to bed. Start all over the next AM.

    So unnecessary. All learned eating behaviors. Acceptable norm. It's food.
  • tishsmith101
    tishsmith101 Posts: 1,587 Member
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    I suppose I've been aware of my cues the past several years but it wasn't until making this my lifestyle that it started to make sense. And reading the discussion above feels like a revelation or awakening about my hunger vs. eating. Recently I have been packing less for my worktime meals and snacks. I thought I'd be hungry and feared buying extra. Actually the opposite is happening, I realize I still have a snack in my bag still when I get home.

    I need to build on that on the weekends.
  • ccrdragon
    ccrdragon Posts: 3,368 Member
    edited February 2018
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    tmoneyag99 wrote: »
    My 8th grade history teacher back in '90 told the class. "The American past time is not baseball it's eating. Think about it, When you go to a sporting event what's the first question you ask "Where/What are we going to eat" When you go to the movies "Wanna eat before or after? What snacks are we going to have" If you go on a date dinner is usually included. When you get together with friends or family food is involved."

    She was right. Our culture is more centered around food than it is anything else.

    This is my wife's 'thing'... she is the nurturer and food is always involved when people/family get together. She spent the weekend with friends (girl's w/e out) where all she had to do was show up and everything would be provided, but she just HAD to bake cookies and take a small brisket just because that's who she is.
  • bametels
    bametels Posts: 950 Member
    edited February 2018
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    This is my wife's 'thing'... she is the nurturer and food is always involved when people/family get together. She spent the weekend with friends (girl's w/e out) where all she had to do was show up and everything would be provided, but she just HAD to bake cookies and take a small brisket just because that's who she is. @ccrdragon

    This is a tough one to break. Many of us were socialized to believe that food = love. Therefore, cooking for family and friends is they way to show your loved ones how you feel about them. Adopting this WOE has helped me to break this cycle, not that I've totally conquered it.

  • tmoneyag99
    tmoneyag99 Posts: 480 Member
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    xerogs1 wrote: »
    I read a book last year called "Salt, Sugar, Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us" by Michael Moss and another book about uncontrollable eating I just can't remember the name or Author of that one. One thing that stood out to me is how precarious food companies are in some sense and that they have designed food to hit a bliss point which encompasses different combinations of salt, sugar, and fat with thoughts on maximizing shelf life and other things. The food companies have tapped into an evolutionary trait where humans used to eat as much as they could when the food was available because the next meal was unknown or something like fruit is only available at certain times of the year. It's difficult to put down those designed foods and they can be addictive as well because they stimulate the reward centers in the brain. LCHF has helped me break that cycle although I have made mistakes now and then but this WOE has made me conscious of those mistakes, before I would mindlessly eat and then wonder why I was gaining weight...its sounds silly but it is what it is.

    So here is the thing, while I don't know about all food companies, I did work for a company that developed food products for it's customers. They had food trials with their employees. It was kind of cool because you could effectively get free lunch every so often if you participated in the taste tests. They would have a battery of products that you had to fill out a questionnaire on how the food tasted to you.

    I don't think by evil design they are trying to get us hooked. The fact of the matter is that they are competing with other companies to sell their products so they attempt to develop something that is desirable to most people and would elicit a purchase over their competitor. Lets face it, if you are a vegetarian you aren't in the target market for chicken tenders. (I also had to sit in market presentations. They provided food offerings based on the demographics of the people that shopped at each store) Part of this is on us. Creating habits and choices that don't support that behavior. The giant food companies can OFFER us their cookie, but we can choose to eat a homemade one or a piece of fruit. How often have you had your mother's home made deserts and they tasted so much better than what the food corporations provide.

    They offer convenience and we are choosing to accept that convenience. Often times we choose the more convenient option when we are distracted with work deadlines, family obligations, or stressful events. Unfortunately, those things have become a common staple in our lives.

    I think this conversation is much akin to the "Which came first, the chicken or the egg" analogy.
  • canadjineh
    canadjineh Posts: 5,396 Member
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    @tmoneyag99, I agree that it's not really an evil plan as such... but it is "maximize profit for shareholders in the cheapest way possible for the company." Make people want your product more than the other company's, and more than they actually need.
  • GaleHawkins
    GaleHawkins Posts: 8,160 Member
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    Evil is an adult abusing s 4 year old for their own sick needs.

    We as adults have to become responsible for we eat. Setting here at McDonald's I see some children being set up for future health issues but I don't see any evil intent. McDonald's is selling the customers what they order. They take my LCHF order without questioning it's validity as a WOE.

    Food companies are like car companies. They produce what sells and stop producing what doesn't sell.
  • baconslave
    baconslave Posts: 6,956 Member
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    Evil is an adult abusing s 4 year old for their own sick needs.

    We as adults have to become responsible for we eat. Setting here at McDonald's I see some children being set up for future health issues but I don't see any evil intent. McDonald's is selling the customers what they order. They take my LCHF order without questioning it's validity as a WOE.

    Food companies are like car companies. They produce what sells and stop producing what doesn't sell.

    Classic capitalism. The mighty dollar reigns supreme. So this isn't shocking holding that in mind. No conspiracy.
    Whether or not it's good for people is another issue. So it's up to the consumer to put their dollars in the products in their best interest.
    Easier said than done though, right? :smirk:
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
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    "Pure" capitalism doesn't subsidize polluters and manufacturers of other socially-costly products through a crazy quilt of friendly regulation and tax. Also, the long-term costs of what they produce, like cleanup, medical care, etc. (assuming everyone could agree what they are..) are not incorporated in the price of the products and set aside to deal with the fallout....
  • kpk54
    kpk54 Posts: 4,474 Member
    edited February 2018
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    I have no personal battles with the "Big Food" industry (Kraft, Unilever, Kellogg, etc). I simply choose to not purchase their products unless they fit into my food plan. Shortens my time spent in the grocery store.

    While I acknowledge their use of fat/salt/sugar to develop highly palatable food, I also acknowledge that the use of those ingredients is for purpose of increased market share resulting dividends to their shareholders. That is why companies are in business. @GaleHawkins ' last sentence of his post above is perfect sense and a truth.

    My interest lies more in the ability to recognize and alter my response to the multitude of food cues that are ever present in my environment while 2) reflecting on the answer to why if I do not what to be fat, would I engage in the action of eating those foods that result my over eating behavior? It's not something I lose sleep over. My awareness aids in remedying the "problem". A TV commercial (of ooey-gooey cheese dripping pizza being enjoyed by a happy, laughing group of friends/family) during a football game, no longer prompts me to go to the kitchen to find something to eat. Most of the time.

    I like "tasty food" as much as the next person and I cook daily. I can ignore the boiled eggs in my refrigerator. Unless I am hungry, they'll remain in the refrigerator. Given an urge to eat for the sheer joy of eating, I'll add fat (mayo), sugar (artificially sweetened relish) and salt. Suddenly they become deviled eggs or egg salad and I am more inclined to eat them...when not hungry. I doubt I am the only person who makes highly palatable low carb/keto food only to then...unfortunately eat it in excess.
  • tmoneyag99
    tmoneyag99 Posts: 480 Member
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    baconslave wrote: »
    Evil is an adult abusing s 4 year old for their own sick needs.

    We as adults have to become responsible for we eat. Setting here at McDonald's I see some children being set up for future health issues but I don't see any evil intent. McDonald's is selling the customers what they order. They take my LCHF order without questioning it's validity as a WOE.

    Food companies are like car companies. They produce what sells and stop producing what doesn't sell.

    Classic capitalism. The mighty dollar reigns supreme. So this isn't shocking holding that in mind. No conspiracy.
    Whether or not it's good for people is another issue. So it's up to the consumer to put their dollars in the products in their best interest.
    Easier said than done though, right? :smirk:

    Would you rather have a system where the gov't tells you what you are allowed to eat and how much? Ever see images of the Native American, Cuban or Russian food lines? No thank you.

    The key is education, education, education and information. I'm 100% okay with restaurants being required to provide calorie and ingredient information on their food. BUT the ultimate choice falls on the consumer. I imagine if everyone started ordering burgers with no buns, McDonalds would gladly toss the buns to reduce costs and increase margins.

    Maybe we should all start requesting that they serve Broccoli or Green beans as a veggie option. Capitalism is a demand based system with consideration to available supply.
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
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    In theory.....