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"Jogging" versus "Jogger."

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  • Lachelleofthesea
    Lachelleofthesea Posts: 24 Member
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    If you run, you are a runner... I suppose if you jog, you are a jogger? To each their own. :wink:

    No! NOT TO EACH THEIR OWN!! This is an organized society, we have to have some damn law and order!! What about the children- won't someone think of the children?!

    Wow... I'm impressed with your passionate concern for future generations.
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,866 Member
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    I still hesitate to call myself a runner, and even this week I've found myself finding ever more elaborate ways to say that I run.

    That said I couldn't actually describe where there is a distinction between running and jogging, and doing so would give me a threshold to point at to say whether I am a runner or not. Equally I don't want to be one of those who would say that one can only be a runner if one is doing better than a ten minute mile. I'm not, by inclination, exclusionary except where it's around professional banter.

    I think the other aspect for me is the number of threads in the general forum where posters have a very apologetic tone of voice about only jogging, and that strikes me as quite frustrating. People feel as if they should apologise for not being, rather than stepping up to the opportunity. They worry about where the threshold is, setting themselves some arbitrary guide to what's jogging and what's running.

    I think the only way that I can approach it would be to identify those who are not runners, even then there is that grey area of those who pound out the time on a treadmill on the basis that it burns most calories. Are they running or not?

    I take the view that there is running, and walking. Running at a variety of paces, and objectives, is all just running.
  • tappae
    tappae Posts: 568 Member
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    Many elite runners have publicly embraced the big umbrella. However, knowing humans, some probably do even though they never seem to spout off about it.

    I participated in a track meet style race last year. We unwittingly set up next to the highest-seeded runners. Every time I came back from racing or staying warm or whatever, my wife would be upset because of how she heard these guys talking about the other runners. She ended up having a terrible day listening to them talk about how superior they were. Now, they were hardly "elite," but only locally so.

    One of the doctors I work with used to be a division I athlete (lacrosse). He decided to tell me about seeing a 13.1 sticker on a car driven by a woman that was "clearly not a runner." Apparently, he could tell by just looking at her. I had to tell him that runners were inclusive and that she was a runner and he wasn't, since his running had always been training for something else and not an end in itself.
  • jessspurr
    jessspurr Posts: 258 Member
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    One of the doctors I work with used to be a division I athlete (lacrosse). He decided to tell me about seeing a 13.1 sticker on a car driven by a woman that was "clearly not a runner." Apparently, he could tell by just looking at her. I had to tell him that runners were inclusive and that she was a runner and he wasn't, since his running had always been training for something else and not an end in itself.

    Eww what a creep. I think this is a very good distinction of what makes a "runner" (the debate regarding running vs. jogging set aside). Many people hesitate to call themselves "runners" because they aren't super fast or they have just recently taken up the sport. I think that a runner is anyone who runs for the joy of running and not just running for the sake of weight loss or other training. I'm a runner sure as heck am!
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
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    Frankly, running has taken a similar part in my life as religion.

    You tell me I'm a poor excuse for a Christian because X, Y and Z, I'm going to roll my eyes at you and keep doing what I'm doing. That is between me and God.

    Same thing with running. I know what running means to me. It's almost mystical how it means very similar things to a wide variety of people who can't even explain it using language.

    Whether ****head Joe thinks I'm a runner or not...whether I feel comfortable applying the word to myself on a particular day, really doesn't matter in the context of the feeling I got bounding over thick turf yesterday.

    As one very wise man put it:

    Why do you run?
    - I run for the same reason I breathe

    Why do you breathe?
    - I'm not going to dignify that with a response.

    But, to get back to the original topic, can a runner validly describe a particular type of motion that they do as a "jog"?

    I guess. What's the difference between jumping and leaping?
  • pobalita
    pobalita Posts: 741 Member
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    I was having enough trouble deciding if I was a "runner" or a "long distance runner". Now I have to consider that I might be a "jogger", too? This is getting way too confusing.
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
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    I was having enough trouble deciding if I was a "runner" or a "long distance runner". Now I have to consider that I might be a "jogger", too? This is getting way too confusing.

    This is why we need rules.
  • UrbanRunner81
    UrbanRunner81 Posts: 1,207 Member
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    Hell my little old lady neighbor always sees me when I am walking like cooling down for a run as I walk up to my house. She always asks how my walk is? I look completely flushed in the face and sweat dripping off me. I guess she thinks I am out of shape. lol


    I think a warm up as a jog I guess. I don't know. I really don't think much about it. I always thought of jogging as what you did when you ran in place?