Vegan vs vegan diet

24

Replies

  • LJSmith1989
    LJSmith1989 Posts: 650

    Actually, I'm fine with a strict definition. I am 100% never-even-consider-eating-meat vegetarian and don't like it when people who eat fish or occasional chicken call themselves vegetarian. It does dilute the meaning. It probably depends on the context in which you are using the word though.

    With a 100% adherence definition- NO ONE is vegan or should use that name.
    Questions to ask yourselves- if making one mistake in a 9 month window makes a person not meet the 100% mark, then clearly the past counts. How far back in the past? And who decides that? When you were a baby, or a young child did your parents give you cow's milk or meat? Did you ever eat Milk Chocolate? If so you weren't' vegan then, so you couldn't be now. You would never be at that 100% measure.
    Can you see how imposing a standard definition makes no sense?

    I think people should do the best they can based upon their beliefs. I eat a plant-based diet which IS vegan, but I don't call myself vegan because I refuse to be held to some ridiculous standard of so-called perfection that someone else has decided is good for them and everyone else too.

    I personally find the vegan "culture" way too pretentious and judgmental. I'll stick with "plant-based".

    Is bacon a plant?
  • makemewannadie
    makemewannadie Posts: 401 Member
    I ditto most of the above comments really, if you eat dairy, even only very occasionally, you are not a vegan or vegetarian. I don't think that's being militant nor strict either,, definition a vegan is someone who doesn't eat meat and dairy products, so if you eat them albeit not very often, you don't fit into that category! I don't see how that's being judgmental or pretentious. If someone wants to mostly eat vegan but also have eggs or whatever, then by all means go ahead, but you aren't vegan.

    Veganism is a (sigh, this sounds so cliche) lifestyle as well as a diet, or at least it is for a lot of people. I too try to avoid any leather products/make up and skincare products that contain animal products etc. The one exception I make is I own/play the violin, which of course uses a bow made of horsehair and the body fixed with non-vegan glues.
  • LJSmith1989
    LJSmith1989 Posts: 650
    I ditto most of the above comments really, if you eat dairy, even only very occasionally, you are not a vegan or vegetarian. I don't think that's being militant nor strict either,, definition a vegan is someone who doesn't eat meat and dairy products, so if you eat them albeit not very often, you don't fit into that category! I don't see how that's being judgmental or pretentious. If someone wants to mostly eat vegan but also have eggs or whatever, then by all means go ahead, but you aren't vegan.

    Veganism is a (sigh, this sounds so cliche) lifestyle as well as a diet, or at least it is for a lot of people. I too try to avoid any leather products/make up and skincare products that contain animal products etc. The one exception I make is I own/play the violin, which of course uses a bow made of horsehair and the body fixed with non-vegan glues.

    So whats the definition of Vegetarian then? I thought it was someone who does not eat meat but eats diary products?
  • sarahhorrigan
    sarahhorrigan Posts: 64 Member

    So whats the definition of Vegetarian then? I thought it was someone who does not eat meat but eats diary products?

    It's basically 'no dead stuff' - so no meat, fish or stuff that contains stuff from dead things, i.e. rennet, gelatine. However, what people consider vegetarian seems to be much more vague than that - some people say they're vegetarian if they eat fish (I've also come across someone who said they were vegetarian just because they don't eat red meat!!).
  • LJSmith1989
    LJSmith1989 Posts: 650

    So whats the definition of Vegetarian then? I thought it was someone who does not eat meat but eats diary products?

    It's basically 'no dead stuff' - so no meat, fish or stuff that contains stuff from dead things, i.e. rennet, gelatine. However, what people consider vegetarian seems to be much more vague than that - some people say they're vegetarian if they eat fish (I've also come across someone who said they were vegetarian just because they don't eat red meat!!).

    Haha ahh I see
    Yeah my friends little sister is vegetarian but eats chicken :/
  • batalina
    batalina Posts: 209 Member
    in re: does making mistakes make you not-vegan, to me, a lot of it is in the intent. if you eat something you reasonably think is vegan and find out later that it wasn't, that's just a learning experience, and i don't think that makes you less vegan. i recently ate cheese in a taco bell burrito because they gave me a regular bean burrito instead of the fresco kind at the drive-through, and i was eating it in my car on the way to work because i was in a hurry and didn't have time to go back or get something else. i didn't see it as a slip-up or a lapse on my part because i was doing the best i reasonably could at the moment, and my receipt DID say "fresco" on it, corroborating that that's what i had ordered. really, it was an interesting learning experience because the cheese tasted really gross! very salty and strange... it reinforced the fact that after 4 years, i definitely don't miss the stuff.
  • MrsODriscoll
    MrsODriscoll Posts: 127 Member
    Interesting thread! I eat vegan 95% of the time but never call myself vegan because of years of problems caused by people who say they're vegetarian but eat chicken or fish. I do however order vegan catering when at work events so a lot of people think I am vegan. It's a hard call but I don't think I should muddy the waters by claiming to be vegan when I'm not, in the strictest sense of the word. If I said I eat plant based, people would just look at me and have no idea what I mean!
  • heliumheels
    heliumheels Posts: 241 Member
    Vegan diet = not eating animal products. Vegan = not using or buying any animal products whatsoever. At least that's my guess.
  • lemonmon1
    lemonmon1 Posts: 134 Member
    Agreed! Some people eat a mostly vegan diet, but they don't look into everything. I consider a true vegan someone who makes every effort not to consume (food or other products) that came from an animal. I don't know why some people consider honey vegan. It's sad for the bees. They are part of the animal kingdom too! I would never bash anyone for doing it, though. To each their own!
  • EndOfCycle
    EndOfCycle Posts: 12
    I'm a vegan. I don't ever eat anything containing any animal product. I don't use items containing animal ingredients. I don't use items tested on animals. I consider myself a strict vegan.

    I do feel there is a massive difference in a vegan diet and vegan lifestyle.
  • darla499
    darla499 Posts: 402 Member
    Although my diet would qualify me as a "vegan" I don't call myself a vegan because I am not radical about it. I do it for health and ethical reasons.

    I eat a raw diet. So if it had a pulse or if man made it, I don't eat it.

    I support anyone making any healthy changes to their diet. We all start somewhere.
  • JetsetterBabe
    JetsetterBabe Posts: 20 Member
    I read a comment recently that said something about 'a vegan diet' being different to being vegan. What does anyone reckon? Are you still vegan if you 'lapse' from time to time? I tend to think that if you eat any animal products you can't really call yourself vegan - but you might say that you follow a vegan diet for most of the time. But, I'm guessing from the recent thread on eating meat that other people who are part of this group don't have that same definition.

    So... are you a vegan if you still occasionally eat animal products?

    You are definitely not a vegan if you eat animal products. You could however you say you follow a plant based diet.

    I think people are confusing eating a plant based diet with veganism. Besides avoiding animal products (no matter how little), veganism reaches far beyond what one eats. It includes avoiding leather, fur, personal items and cosmetics that contain animal products (like majority of red lipstick). There is also a lot of food that even PETA deems vegan that isn't, like Oreos (since they have various sources of sweeteners and sometimes they aren't vegan). A vegan diet technically does not allow for sugar (since that's made using animal bone char), anything that has caramel color, or drinking liquor that utilizes animal products for production. Those eating a plant based diet aren't necessarily concerned whether the shampoo they are using is cruelty and animal product free or that their Mercedes comes with leather or leatherette. Vegans are.
  • mikeveggie68
    mikeveggie68 Posts: 116
    wow, many opinion's here... as a new vegan, i wouldn't want anyone to question my reason for becoming a vegan be it die hard or diet based. if you've watched forks over knives or vegucation you can see the benefits health wise for yourself and how you can benefit making the world a greener place to live, so if you are a die hard vegan don't impose your standards on those who are diet based, bottom line lables suck and meateaters look at us the same anyway so we don't need to be getting in each others way, we need to be supporting each other no matter what. EAT GREEN and Live Long and Prosper lol
  • FrankieTrailBlazer
    FrankieTrailBlazer Posts: 124 Member
    Setting the bar @ perfection is recipe for individual failure and group misery.

    As long as one is making a full faith effort then that should be good enough.

    It would be silly and self-defeating if vegan hardliner's chose to alienate all those aspiring vegans by looking down on them.

    Nobody is perfect, including vegans, at least the human ones. [If one hasnt been vegan since consciousness or birth for that matter, can one really call oneself a real vegan??]

    Becoming vegan is a process, a process that takes quite some time to correct decades of learned habits from family, community, and country.

    Time to focus on the positives and unite instead of allow unrealistic expectations to divide the community....
  • mikeveggie68
    mikeveggie68 Posts: 116
    Setting the bar @ perfection is recipe for individual failure and group misery.

    As long as one is making a full faith effort then that should be good enough.

    It would be silly and self-defeating if vegan hardliner's chose to alienate all those aspiring vegans by looking down on them.

    Nobody is perfect, including vegans, at least the human ones. [If one hasnt been vegan since consciousness or birth for that matter, can one really call oneself a real vegan??]

    Becoming vegan is a process, a process that takes quite some time to correct decades of learned habits from family, community, and country.

    Time to focus on the positives and unite instead of allow unrealistic expectations to divide the community....

    well said
  • TanzaMarie
    TanzaMarie Posts: 94 Member
    I'm vegan 80-90% of the time. I do it for my health. Even though I know I'm not a "real" vegan. I tell people who only kinda know me I am, because it saves a whole lot of confusion. For whatever reason people (at an office party, etc) always want to know why I'm not eating X. It's so much easier to say "I'm vegan", rather than saying, that I eat mostly vegan, I can't have dairy, I try to be plant based, but every once in a while I'll have sushi or meat if I really want it, which is nearly never.

    I wish I could call myself plant based but I love vegan junk food way way way to much.
  • sinistras
    sinistras Posts: 244 Member
    While I strive not to buy or consume food and other products made from animals for my own health and ethical reasons, this "true vegan" --are you perfect enough, good enough, VEGAN enough--will not help this movement catch on. Getting into squirrelly conversations about how "vegan" you are tends to intimidate and alienate those who are not, even other vegans.

    My vote is, keep "how vegan" you are to yourself. Pat yourself on the back, and keep it up. You are doing a good thing for your health, the environment, AND reducing animal suffering, regardless if you are vegan only in diet or in a broader lifestyle.

    Instead of the tireless "how vegan are you" conversation, consider doing something productive, and volunteer leafletting at a local college with Vegan Outreach (veganoutreach.org) With a smile and light heart, spread the positive message of veganism to total strangers. While not everyone will drop everything to take up a vegan diet or lifestyle, everyone you encounter will at least think about it. And hopefully, several will come back to ask questions or tips to get started.

    Small changes beyond the vegan population, such as encouraging meat-eating friends to try Meatless Mondays, have a much greater impact on reducing suffering. Energy should focus on that vs. how vegan us "vegans" are...
  • Telpa
    Telpa Posts: 21 Member
    I don't eat meat or dairy, but don't worry about if my food contains white flour/sugar etc. If I am at a restaurant and there is a veggie burger, I don't ask what's in the bun. I have slipped up and eaten cheese 5 times in the past year. I don't go out of my way to buy leather or fur, but don't buy vegan clothes either. I call myself a vegan, because it's easier and gets the point across.
  • LoseYouself
    LoseYouself Posts: 249 Member
    What you're referring to would be considered (in my personal opinion) a "plant-based diet" rather than truly vegan, since there's a lot more to veganism than simply diet alone, and is a lifestyle in which people strive to avoid animal products at all costs and do not occasionally consume them.. at least not intentionally.

    I suppose you could also consider it being a strict vegetarian if you eat a vegan diet most of the time, but occasionally include dairy or eggs. If you eat meat occasionally you'd be considered neither vegetarian OR vegan by a lot of people's standards. It really just depends on who you ask.

    I've also heard it called a "dietary vegan" before. That's how I started out, and now after a year i'm slowly starting to move onto buying animal and environmentally friendly soaps, shampoos, etc. At first I just focused on diet, so I referred to myself as a dietary vegan if people asked. I just discovered a great organic all natural soap that you can use for hair, body, everything. It's also not tested on animals and contains no chemicals. It's awesome and it's cheaper!
  • LoseYouself
    LoseYouself Posts: 249 Member
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