My 600-lb Life

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JamesAztec
JamesAztec Posts: 524 Member
I'm sure most of us are familiar with this show in which severely obese individuals are given the opportunity to have bariatric surgery and change their life. Today there happens to be a "marathon" on TLC.

Obviously it's "reality" TV so some things have to be taken with a grain of salt. And every moment on the show is very dramatic. That being said, I've watched some episodes and it's interesting to see how their size and their families effect their lives so dramatically. Some things I can definitely relate to. I'm grateful that I don't have anyone close to me trying to sabotage my health for their own selfish reasons. Many of these family members are themselves obese and they can't seem to handle the change in the other person.

Just thought I'd get people's thoughts on the show if you have any. :-)
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Replies

  • garber6th
    garber6th Posts: 1,894 Member
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    It surprises me not only how some people sabotage for selfish reasons, but how some people are so clueless to the fact that they are huge enablers. It's like, you are feeding cake to an immobile person, how do you not know you are part of the problem??
  • asia1967
    asia1967 Posts: 707 Member
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    Living It as we speak. My new confidence and self worth have made me into a B**ch who is selfish and only cares about herself. Funny I don't remember hearing those words when I sacrificed everything including my health and identity. Hmm makes you think, that is for sure. Good post!
  • cheekitty
    cheekitty Posts: 101 Member
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    I had never seen the show before tonight (It's on hulu for those like me that don't have cable) and ... ooof. I'm wondering now how soon I can enroll at a gym, because these poor people. :(
  • Jamielynn_77
    Jamielynn_77 Posts: 85 Member
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    Yeah I have seen this show and sometimes my heart goes out to these people. It just reminds me more and more of what I went thru to get here and that I need to stay focused and not let myself or anyonse else sabotage my success. And I have heard that too, that I am selfish, I have changed, I am no fun. And that's okay. I was more fun when I had a foot in the grave being 150 lbs overweight. :astonished:
  • Jamielynn_77
    Jamielynn_77 Posts: 85 Member
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    garber6th wrote: »
    It surprises me not only how some people sabotage for selfish reasons, but how some people are so clueless to the fact that they are huge enablers. It's like, you are feeding cake to an immobile person, how do you not know you are part of the problem??

    IKR!!! Here these poor people are in the hosptial waiting for surgery, and here comes momma with 3 quarter pounders and fries, because they aren't getting enough to eat. :angry: Well THAT'S helpful.... :wtf:
  • blairmundy
    blairmundy Posts: 219 Member
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    It's crazy that loved ones aren't supporting your change! My husband had this surgery a year before I did. It was hard to suddenly be the one that couldn't keep up, but the changes were so good for him and I can't imagine being anything but happy. My biggest problem was that he still wanted to cook delicious things and there wasn't anyone around to eat them except me. I used to call it vicarious eating. Ha! But not any more.
  • loriloftness
    loriloftness Posts: 476 Member
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    I am amazed at the family members who "love" their overweight family member but continue to feed them almost to the grave. I am amazed at the family members who are not supportive or try to sabotage the weight loss process after surgery. I am amazed at those who have the surgery but don't see the blessing in it and continue to abuse their body with unhealthy food. I'm wondering if any of these people go through the psych appointments like I had to prior to surgery? They never show it as part of the pre-op plan on the show.
  • JamesAztec
    JamesAztec Posts: 524 Member
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    From the looks of it I think a lot of these people are rushed into the surgery. They probably do the bare minimum to get them in.

    If you guys ever get a chance, watch the episode on "Penny". I just saw it last night. Her husband is a huge enabler and she loses next to nothing over a whole year. (She actually had 2 WLS surgeries PRIOR to appearing on the show!) Just goes to show you, you can maintain 500 pounds even with surgery if you have people that enable you to do it and you don't really want to change.
  • cheekitty
    cheekitty Posts: 101 Member
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    Ugh Penny's story put the fear of God into me. It was so tragic, so sad.
  • KarlaYP
    KarlaYP Posts: 4,439 Member
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    The day after my surgery my mother brought me donut holes, while I was still in the hospital! I am still amazed! Though, she is a failed WLS patient. I always knew she is her own saboteur. When I told her no, I did not want any, she sat and ate them herself. Not just a few, a whole bag! Sad!
  • april731
    april731 Posts: 122 Member
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    While I wasn't near 600 pounds at my heaviest, I could definitely identify with some of the behaviors that got them (and me) to that weight. Drive-thrus were my kryptonite and I would sometimes stop at a drive thru and then eat dinner again at home. :(

    What strikes me as interesting (and appalling) is HOW some of these individuals are physically able to eat some of the things they do so soon after surgery. Why they eat those things is clearly an issue as well - I do think that many of them seem to need a lot more psychological support than it appears they give them, pre- or post-op.
  • JamesAztec
    JamesAztec Posts: 524 Member
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    april731 wrote: »
    What strikes me as interesting (and appalling) is HOW some of these individuals are physically able to eat some of the things they do so soon after surgery. Why they eat those things is clearly an issue as well - I do think that many of them seem to need a lot more psychological support than it appears they give them, pre- or post-op.

    Yes, exactly! Now that I've had surgery I know how hard it is to eat. I can't even imagine eating how much they are eating, much less the types of food. They HAD to have gotten some sort of eating guidelines from the surgeon or hospital.
  • LunaGuido
    LunaGuido Posts: 115 Member
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    Karlottap wrote: »
    The day after my surgery my mother brought me donut holes, while I was still in the hospital! I am still amazed! Though, she is a failed WLS patient. I always knew she is her own saboteur. When I told her no, I did not want any, she sat and ate them herself. Not just a few, a whole bag! Sad!

    Karlotta - that's just awful! Congratulations on breaking that cycle and being good to yourself!
  • LunaGuido
    LunaGuido Posts: 115 Member
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    A woman I volunteer with at the animal shelter had weight loss surgery a few years ago. She is doing well, but told me about someone that had surgery around the same time at her Bariatric Center. I guess this man actually stopped at KFC on the way home from the hospital! Sadly, he had severe complications and actually passed away. It sounds like too incredible of a story to believe, but if it is true, that's so sad and messed up!
  • RENAEJAE
    RENAEJAE Posts: 1,136 Member
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    I have to believe they are provided some continued psych consults, but most of these people are so extreme they may not see the importance. It's too bad the show is so dramatized. It would be great if it featured 'Average bari-patients' and they shared their experiences so we could watch and learn. I would tune in for that!
  • garber6th
    garber6th Posts: 1,894 Member
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    Karlottap wrote: »
    The day after my surgery my mother brought me donut holes, while I was still in the hospital! I am still amazed! Though, she is a failed WLS patient. I always knew she is her own saboteur. When I told her no, I did not want any, she sat and ate them herself. Not just a few, a whole bag! Sad!

    That is jaw-droppingly insane! I have a neighbor who brought me a BIG plate of cookies for Christmas two months after my surgery, after we had many talks about surgery and the changes in my diet (she is a very big woman too and was considering surgery). I was stunned. I took the cookies, said thank you, and promptly regifted them. Dealing with people like this makes us that more aware of how we have to own our health and our journey, because some people will just not be helpful. We have to run our own interference!
  • JudiMoving2
    JudiMoving2 Posts: 77 Member
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    That show actually had a smaller series of each of these patients as they followed them for seven years. Seeing the changes in these individuals through the years is REALLY a eye opener. Not sure if you can find it on the net, but the young man who was in his 20s actually fell into a coma for months and barely survived. During his comatose he lost a lot of weight. His mother fed him tacos from Taco Bell, stating he was skin and bones after coming out of his coma. He had lots of re-hab, eventually was able to walk again, and began to eat. Gaining back half of his weight. The seventh year he was dedicating his life to his WLS, and eating correctly. Those were some much better views of the turmulent WLS stories... seven years worth of the same person struggle. The shows on lately are all of the first year only of the same group they followed for 7 years.
  • JreedyJanelle
    JreedyJanelle Posts: 645 Member
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    What gets me are the enablers who also need to lose weight, and they keep bringing the food to them. I like to see them succeed! There was one woman who refused to walk after surgery, she almost died and yet she is arguing with the Dr.
    People have tried to sabotage me, but I just told them I wasn't ready to die for a pie. LOL
  • dsjsmom23
    dsjsmom23 Posts: 234 Member
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    Karlottap wrote: »
    The day after my surgery my mother brought me donut holes, while I was still in the hospital! I am still amazed! Though, she is a failed WLS patient. I always knew she is her own saboteur. When I told her no, I did not want any, she sat and ate them herself. Not just a few, a whole bag! Sad!

    My mother in law did something similar. Not donuts, but she went to DQ and bought sundaes & milkshakes for everyone. Figured a milkshake would be good for me, you know since, I was on a full fluid diet and all. I tore a strip off of her. I was already a hormonal wreck. I basically told her I didn't go through everything I was going through so I could "F" it all up by eating milkshakes all day.

    She is clueless, and is my biggest saboteur. Even to this day. I am pretty much at my goal weight, and she is so jealous. It's quite sad.

    Aztec4Life wrote: »
    april731 wrote: »
    What strikes me as interesting (and appalling) is HOW some of these individuals are physically able to eat some of the things they do so soon after surgery. Why they eat those things is clearly an issue as well - I do think that many of them seem to need a lot more psychological support than it appears they give them, pre- or post-op.

    Yes, exactly! Now that I've had surgery I know how hard it is to eat. I can't even imagine eating how much they are eating, much less the types of food. They HAD to have gotten some sort of eating guidelines from the surgeon or hospital.

    THIS! I am stunned when I watch what some of them eat afterwards. My tummy HURTS even thinking about it. It's awful! I don't know how they can PHYSICALLY eat that stuff.
    I'm 9 months out TODAY, and I still can't eat those amounts of food!


    I do enjoy the show though, and I watch it religiously.
    One thing that REALLY gets me is, NEVER have I seen any of them write down their food, or has the doctor ever asked to see their food journal.

    In my opinion, my food journal is the key to my weight loss success. Without it, I'm sure I wouldn't be where I am today.

    It's a HUGE part of the program I belong to. If we go in for an appointment, and they ask to see our food journal, and we don't have it? We are at risk for being kicked out of the program.

    (We have to be accepted into our program (I waited 1.5 years to get in), then you see the team until you are ready for surgery, then you see them regularly for 5 years after surgery so they can keep tabs on you, and give you the support that you need)

    I feel that some of these patients don't have the proper preop or postop support. It's hard to succeed without that.


  • MissMissie1987
    MissMissie1987 Posts: 72 Member
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    LunaGuido wrote: »
    A woman I volunteer with at the animal shelter had weight loss surgery a few years ago. She is doing well, but told me about someone that had surgery around the same time at her Bariatric Center. I guess this man actually stopped at KFC on the way home from the hospital! Sadly, he had severe complications and actually passed away. It sounds like too incredible of a story to believe, but if it is true, that's so sad and messed up!

    I think I would die if I even smelled all of that greese. I am only 6 weeks out and I still cannot handle fried foods or even some high in fat foods. Wow, some people amaze me how they just think you can continue to eat the same foods. I know my food addiction does guilt me into eating some things I shouldn't but all in all we need to change for the better. I know someone who makes themself sick each time they eat something bad that makes them feel icky. Now that I have it done she wants to try to encourage me to do the same. I told her I would rather just stay away from the foods that make me feel that way.