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Who drinks bone broth?

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ettaterrell
ettaterrell Posts: 887 Member
do you make it yourself? (Share recipe)
How often do you drink?
What's the nutritional info (Cals etc?)
We have a meat market here so I can get all kinds, what's your fav?

Replies

  • salexander31
    salexander31 Posts: 1 Member
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    Just made a batch yesterday and had a cup this morning. I tend to switch it up. This batch had various beef and chicken bones. Dont forge the chicken feet for collagen and it really gels up the broth when cool. ACV for acid to draw minerals from the bones. Onion, garlic, carrot, ginger and seasoning when done for taste. Unfortunately the calorie information is one thing I have never been able to get a clear answer on how to calculate. Ive always been told its negligible so dont worry about it.
  • ettaterrell
    ettaterrell Posts: 887 Member
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    How long did u summer? I made some this morning and I still have it on low heat about 8 hrs now
  • MinaKaye
    MinaKaye Posts: 4 Member
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    I've heard that about the chicken feet, but can you even locate those are your local grocery?
  • moonius
    moonius Posts: 663 Member
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  • moonius
    moonius Posts: 663 Member
    edited December 2015
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    I have some bone broth cooking in the crock pot right now.
  • ettaterrell
    ettaterrell Posts: 887 Member
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    Nice!! Thanks!
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
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    MinaKaye wrote: »
    I've heard that about the chicken feet, but can you even locate those are your local grocery?

    Asian grocery stores usually have them
  • KetoRobin
    KetoRobin Posts: 1 Member
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    I've tried making on my own a few times but recently tried Bare Bones. It's pricey, but they offer free shipping above a certain $ amount purchased. They deliver to your front door (on dry ice!) and the product is absolutely superior. Can't recommend this enough! Tastes great, all natural and organic. Very convenient for my purposes. And the calorie content is negligible. I've even used it as a base in several different LCHF recipes ...
  • breezy178
    breezy178 Posts: 11 Member
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    I've made my own (you can google a recipe, or a great resource is www.marksdailyapple.com), but recently I was lazy so I purchased a bunch from Osso Good Bones. I got the chicken, beef, and gut healing broths and they're all amazing. Amazing flavor and of course, grass fed bones and organic ingredients used.
  • breezy178
    breezy178 Posts: 11 Member
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    I totally forgot to mention that I semi-bulletproof my bone broth when I drink it. I add a couple tablespoons of grass fed butter and mix it with my stick blender. A nice way to get some extra fat in and it tastes delicious.
  • FXOjafar
    FXOjafar Posts: 174 Member
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    I have a daily dose, either a cup of it on it's own, or I make some kind of Chinese or Thai soup dish from it.
  • Allmyusernamesaretakengeeze
    Allmyusernamesaretakengeeze Posts: 146 Member
    edited May 2016
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    I'm lucky enough to live in the middle of an Amish community. Every fall, when they are butchering, a five-gallon bucket filled with three-inch lengths of bone arrives. Some of the bones go into the freezer. Others go into my 32-quart stock pot and begin simmering. Because I do big batches, it is normally a 48-hour simmer. I borrow three pressure canners and get seven-quart jars of broth per canner.
  • neweuquol
    neweuquol Posts: 62 Member
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    MinaKaye wrote: »
    I've heard that about the chicken feet, but can you even locate those are your local grocery?

    My local save a lot has them.
  • ellenkilpatrick
    ellenkilpatrick Posts: 67 Member
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    I am in San Antonio. And I can't find any bones to make bone broth.. Can some one help me? I looked up the 2 sites mentioned and those were a little too pricey Thanjs
  • HeartIcare
    HeartIcare Posts: 52 Member
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    Really enjoy making bone broth with different seasonings, dried and fresh herbs. What I like is the versatility you have to make your own with the diversity of cooking and using international recipes.
    I am still a fan of crockpots, but the best equipment is having purchased an Instant Pot. Instead of occasionally
    I've been making broth very regularly, with the benefit to make two pots from the same bones in a shorter time under pressure. The first batch is intense and most flavourful (noodle soups, stew and sauce base etc) and the second batch is perfect to have it as a drink or use as cooking liquid for stir-fries. In the winter I'll add extra fresh ginger (ginger bone tea) for a bit of heat (to get blood circulation going with added bonus of many medicinal properties as anti-inflammatory effects and lowering blood sugar).

    Next to ginger other favorite adds are cinnamon, star anise, cardamom, galangal and lemon grass (Chinese homemade chicken essence or southeast Asian Singapore/Malaysian style Bak ku teh and fit in Keto diet). Another way to impair flavour is to choose between blanching or roasting the bones together with or without the use of spice and herbs in the oven.

    I live in The Netherlands and mostly get my calf- and chicken bones from a local Islam butcher shop for free or very cheap. The easiest to use are chicken carcasses, lamb bones broth as a base are fantastic in Chinese fondue's and if I'm lucky to buy everything at one place, mix cow, calfs, pork, and chicken together that make the best powerful broth in flavour and taste.
  • maezombiegirl
    maezombiegirl Posts: 21 Member
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    I buy pastured chicken backs and necks from a local butcher; he cuts the frozen bones into cubes to make it easier to fit into a pot. I stopped using aromatics (onions, celery etc), mostly because I like the flavor better without them.

    I have a large stainless steel stock pot that I bought at Wal-mart for about $15.00. I just fill the bottom third with bones and cover with water. I cook it down, usually for about 36 hours or until the bones are quite soft, adding a bit more water as necessary. Take it off the heat, strain into a large bowl and let cool.

    Then I put in the fridge. As the fat solidifies, I scrape it off for cooking and then put the broth into small Glad containers (single serve). I get good gel without using chicken feet (hard to find where I live). I also buy pastured chickens locally and save the carcasses, skin, all fatty parts and anything else I can get lol. Sometimes rotisserie chickens from the store (makes the broth so tasty!).