My Body Fat Results & Cholesterol

Hey everyone,
Me and my husband went and got out body fat scanned using a DEXA scan. The DEXA scan is one of the most accurate ways to assess body fat. I believe the number one method is underwater weighing? Not too sure... but I wanted to post my results in case anyone was interested. I was definitely shocked.



I also made a video regarding our Biometrics Screenings... cholesterol on keto.


Replies

  • anubis609
    anubis609 Posts: 3,966 Member
    DXA, bodpod, hydrostatic weight, etc. are all *more accurate estimations* but nothing is absolutely accurate unless it's an autopsy report. Good stuff, though.
  • LolaDeeDaisy23
    LolaDeeDaisy23 Posts: 383 Member
    anubis609 wrote: »
    DXA, bodpod, hydrostatic weight, etc. are all *more accurate estimations* but nothing is absolutely accurate unless it's an autopsy report. Good stuff, though.

    That's what I figured but found this online:
    https://www.dexafit.com/blog2/body-fat-measurement

    DXA measures not just lean tissue and fat, but bone density as well. BodPod and hydrostatic weighing only measure lean tissue and fat.... and use bone density as a constant. A 5'5, 160 pound athlete is going to have greater bone density than a 5'5, 160 pound elderly person.
  • anubis609
    anubis609 Posts: 3,966 Member
    anubis609 wrote: »
    DXA, bodpod, hydrostatic weight, etc. are all *more accurate estimations* but nothing is absolutely accurate unless it's an autopsy report. Good stuff, though.

    That's what I figured but found this online:
    https://www.dexafit.com/blog2/body-fat-measurement

    DXA measures not just lean tissue and fat, but bone density as well. BodPod and hydrostatic weighing only measure lean tissue and fat.... and use bone density as a constant. A 5'5, 160 pound athlete is going to have greater bone density than a 5'5, 160 pound elderly person.

    Yes, if you have an interest in bone density as well as visceral/organ fat accumulation, and relative fat mass, then DXA is highly recommended to measure a variety of those factors. Generally speaking, most people are primarily concerned with just their body fat percentage for body composition. People with a family history of osteoporosis or osteopenia may perhaps be more interested in bone health, as well as elderly people whose bone mineral density declines with age.

    I just wanted to make the distinction that nothing will be completely 100% accurate and changes in body composition may or may not be picked up by certain tests since there's a variety of factors that can shift changes in fat free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) like hydration status, glycogen saturation, poop accumulation, etc.

    That said, DXA is still widely considered the quickest and least invasive standard of accuracy, but it does cost money and some people may want to shell out the cash/credit just to verify their bf% unless they have a compelling reason to do so. While it may take a bit of extra calculation and some courage, there are also alternative methods to tracking bf% without needing a DXA scan.

    http://comfortpit.com/how-to-calculate-body-fat-percentage-wisdom-of-crowds/

    In the same article, he links Lyle's article as well that discusses the various methods of determining body composition. Whichever one you prefer is going to be subjective and if you can afford DXA scans periodically, then more power to you.

    https://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/measuring-body-composition-part-2.html

    And just to throw in another option, the Skulpt body fat analyzer exists. They claim it's within 3% error within DXA, obviously taken with a grain of salt, but it is reusable and able to be done at home using multiple points of measurement.

    My Skulpt results as an example. It says I'm 12.3% bf, but visually, I'd probably put myself at about 16%:

    rpyyyp4hhu94.png
    66byjh7nv79a.png

  • LolaDeeDaisy23
    LolaDeeDaisy23 Posts: 383 Member
    @anubis609 Okay so I checked out the links you posted, and the first link is stating that people can visually give you a correct body fat percentage?
    & how is this more accurate than a DEXA scan?

    Also if you see the video, we find out my husband’s body fat percentage and he clearly does not look like he has that high of a percentage...

    Your only con to getting a DXA scan is not that it’s “not 100% accurate” but it’s so accurate that it’s expensive and hardly worth it? The link on the Lyle McDonald website you posted is 9 years old. DEXA scan prices have dropped tremendously. I only dished out $70 for a scan and I didn’t have to travel across the world to visit a DEXA clinic. They’re pretty prevalent now.

    Check out this article by Mr. McDonald:
    https://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/dexa-versus-calipers-for-body-fat-estimation.html/

    He states DEXA always comes out with a higher reading than traditional testing methods. Someone who looks 7%bf is actually 10-12% according to a DEXA scan.

    But what really matters is measuring yourself with the same tools under the same conditions, consistently. If you’re using calipers and your reading is 12% bf, 10 weeks later measure again and your 6% then that means you essentially dropped 6% of bf. But it doesn’t mean that you ARE 6%bf...

    Visually looking at my husband, you can see he is not obese by any means, yet the DEXA scan says differently. It also shows that he is at high risk for coronary heart disease... even though he is young and of normal weight. It’s due to poor eating habits. He’s considered “skinny fat.” I just wanted to share my experience here because I thought others might find it informative and might be interested in getting a DXA scan as well.
  • 123sind
    123sind Posts: 80 Member
    I use this scale which does everything i need to know.
    With the Tanita BC-545n, it is easy to measure your fitness progress and overall health.  Just step on this Body Composition Monitor and grab the handles. Within 15 seconds, it will provide you with ten different health measurements. To do this, it uses advanced Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA).

    Moreover, it separately shows you the muscle and fat percentages of each of your arms and legs, as well as your trunk. This allows you to spot muscle imbalances, set goals for specific areas and prevent injury. 

    It also works out my calories intake for each day.
    check it out it does so much more.
  • Gallowmere1984
    Gallowmere1984 Posts: 6,626 Member
    edited February 2018
    123sind wrote: »
    I use this scale which does everything i need to know.
    With the Tanita BC-545n, it is easy to measure your fitness progress and overall health.  Just step on this Body Composition Monitor and grab the handles. Within 15 seconds, it will provide you with ten different health measurements. To do this, it uses advanced Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA).

    Moreover, it separately shows you the muscle and fat percentages of each of your arms and legs, as well as your trunk. This allows you to spot muscle imbalances, set goals for specific areas and prevent injury. 

    It also works out my calories intake for each day.
    check it out it does so much more.

    Bioimpedance is horribly flawed. It’s not even good for consistency. Go pee, you’ll have lost a bunch of “muscle”. Go eat a bunch of sushi. The next day, you’re suddenly ready for the Olympia stage.
  • 123sind
    123sind Posts: 80 Member
    Well i am happy with my scale, i get what i need from it :)
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,020 Member
    Thanks for sharing your results. And congrats, they are all really good!

    Your hubby's scan was higher than I expected but you can see he has a bit of extra just looking at his arms. He has the build where you know he has the muscle, but his body fat is not low enough to show it off. He looks very fit but is not slim enough to show that off. KWIM? I would not have guessed 27% though.

    I was laughing to myself as the scanning technician was giving low carb advice, and how no one should eat carbs unless you are running a marathon. LOL I just wanted to tell him to stop talking. ;)
  • retirehappy
    retirehappy Posts: 5,215 Member
    Thanks for posting this, I am going to schedule a Dexa sometime this month. My husband is t2d and he is skinny fat, so I hope to get him to do one with me. There is a clinic that gives you a break if you have two people doing it at the same time. The cost around here is $99. So not that bad.

    I have a Tanita scale that gives body fat, while it jives with my dr. office scale for weight not at all sure about the body fat percentage. That is why I want the scan done.
  • 123sind
    123sind Posts: 80 Member
    Be interesting to see if your results is the same as the Tanita fat%
    Let us know :)
  • LolaDeeDaisy23
    LolaDeeDaisy23 Posts: 383 Member
    @retirehappy I’m so glad to hear that you’re going to get one done! I told my mom about our results and she wants to get one done too. She’s 55 years old and very overweight. She says maybe this is the wake up call she needs to change her diet. We’re planning to go next Monday! I’ll post her results too.
  • retirehappy
    retirehappy Posts: 5,215 Member
    123sind wrote: »
    Be interesting to see if your results is the same as the Tanita fat%
    Let us know :)

    Yes, I want to see how far off it is. My drs. office and my scale match on weight exactly. They just use a chart so don't check body fat %.
  • anubis609
    anubis609 Posts: 3,966 Member
    @anubis609 Okay so I checked out the links you posted, and the first link is stating that people can visually give you a correct body fat percentage?
    & how is this more accurate than a DEXA scan?

    Also if you see the video, we find out my husband’s body fat percentage and he clearly does not look like he has that high of a percentage...

    Your only con to getting a DXA scan is not that it’s “not 100% accurate” but it’s so accurate that it’s expensive and hardly worth it? The link on the Lyle McDonald website you posted is 9 years old. DEXA scan prices have dropped tremendously. I only dished out $70 for a scan and I didn’t have to travel across the world to visit a DEXA clinic. They’re pretty prevalent now.

    Check out this article by Mr. McDonald:
    https://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/dexa-versus-calipers-for-body-fat-estimation.html/

    He states DEXA always comes out with a higher reading than traditional testing methods. Someone who looks 7%bf is actually 10-12% according to a DEXA scan.

    But what really matters is measuring yourself with the same tools under the same conditions, consistently. If you’re using calipers and your reading is 12% bf, 10 weeks later measure again and your 6% then that means you essentially dropped 6% of bf. But it doesn’t mean that you ARE 6%bf...

    Visually looking at my husband, you can see he is not obese by any means, yet the DEXA scan says differently. It also shows that he is at high risk for coronary heart disease... even though he is young and of normal weight. It’s due to poor eating habits. He’s considered “skinny fat.” I just wanted to share my experience here because I thought others might find it informative and might be interested in getting a DXA scan as well.

    I'm not debating the accuracy of DXA. I even stated that it's the standard of accuracy. It's helpful for many and for providing a solid baseline of measurement. We're in agreement there.

    The meta of context I'm aiming at is health vs vanity. For health purposes, yes, test accurately beyond visual representation. For vanity, it may not need to be so precise - unless you're competing.

    For the general public concerned mostly with vanity, I've seen people complain about more for less money. I was merely providing additional resources that could be used.