Type 2 Diabetes - my story.

DietPrada
DietPrada Posts: 1,171 Member
Type 2 diabetes has affected my dad and 9 of his siblings. All of my uncles and aunties have it, and my cousin who is 45 and has never been overweight in her life now has it. My dad was diagnosed at 40 and had his first heart attack and quadruple bypass at 50. His specialists told him diabetes destroyed his arteries in effect turning them into strings of pearls in shape. He had to retire at 50, and from then on he was a sick man. He could barely walk to the letterbox and back. He had migraines which turned out to be mini strokes. He spent 18 years taking all the medications and eating how his diabetes specialist told him to. Low fat and plenty of fruit and carbs. The last 5 years of his life were a constant nightmare of angina and chest pains with a heart attack every three months thrown in for good measure. He passed last July at 68. He did not go easily. When I cleaned out his house I surrendered a full large green bin liner of drugs to the pharmacist for disposal.

4 years ago at 38 my doctor told me I was pre-diabetic. He told me if I did not make a change I would have full blown diabetes by 40. This terrified me, still does. But I'm able to say that I did make that change, I have lost 30kg, and I eat keto. My bloods now show no signs of pre-diabetes and I am on no medication. I hope to keep it that way for as long as possible.

I do not have the luxury of "cheat days" or "falling off the wagon" and having a good old "oh well" laugh about it. My possible future is very real. When people say to me at work in that snarky tone (while stuffing their face with whatever cake was brought in that day) "oh aren't you good" inside I'm thinking "no, I'm not 'good' I'm terrified, I know what that crap will do to me".

Do I still want the cake, the chocolate, the great big toasted sandwich? Yes. Every damned day. But the image of what my dad went through turns those foods into killers in my mind, and that's what keeps me strong.

I guess the reason I'm sharing is because if you are in my situation you do have a chance to do something now. My dad would have had a chance if he had not refused to go to the doctor at 40 when he had symptoms, and if he had made significant changes to his diet early on. If he'd even listened to me when I told him the specialist was wrong, fat was not his enemy, all that other crap he was eating is what blew his sugar levels. I do not want to be old and sick and dying at 60 and wish I had done something while I still could.

Replies

  • treehugnmama
    treehugnmama Posts: 816 Member
    Ebony thanks for sharing your story. I'm sorry to hear about what your dad went through. my story is similar. my dad's Kidneys were distorted by Diabeties and what I have seen him go through I do not wish on anyone. last may a week before my 40th bday I was told I was prediabetic. I took that seriously. I was put on metformin though. I went low carb and lost 60 pounds. I'm now in tje normal range and no sign of prediabeties. I will be slowly we end off met starting in feb.
    I keep reminding myself I need to eat this way for life and health and that the weight loss is just a side affect of eating well and not to focus on the loss but the food I eat.

    I am happy you jave been successfully and I hope you continue on your healthy Journey. thanks for the reminder of the why sometimes I forget!
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,056 Member
    edited January 2017
    @EbonyDahlia, in the different context of talking to other diabetics who aren't LC-awake (yet), is this pretty close to what you'd say?

    @nvmomketo (?) suggested that there are 2 main groups of carb-eating T2Ds - the ones still following conventional HC nutrition advice, who may listen to science or personal testimonials, and carb addicts.....

    It seems like even open-minded people need to hear a new message again and again before it even penetrates their consciousness, let alone gets them thinking about changing their behavior.

    If only every newly - diagnosed T2D could hear your story!

  • 1234usmc
    1234usmc Posts: 196 Member
    I was in a similar position except I let it get all the way to T2D. Seeing my mom go on dialysis after years of other health issues, it hit me like a hammer. I am not as disciplined as you but I try. Here's to continued good health. Thanks for the post.
    Doug
  • DietPrada
    DietPrada Posts: 1,171 Member
    RalfLott wrote: »
    @EbonyDahlia, in the different context of talking to other diabetics who aren't LC-awake (yet), is this pretty close to what you'd say?

    I've found that most people don't want to hear it. Most people are like my dad and believe what the doctor tells them, because ... well ... I don't have a medical degree and the doctor does. A few of my co-workers know I eat low carb, and they know this is a health choice because there is diabetes in my family, but most diabetics I've found don't want to hear it. And I've met a few. My dad would argue black and blue that fat was the cause of his raised sugar levels because this is what his "specialist" told him.

  • Cadori
    Cadori Posts: 4,810 Member
    :( Thank you for sharing
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,056 Member
    edited January 2017
    :s it's still an uphill battle. But hopefully we'll live long enough to see that change.

    I thank my lucky stars every day that I wandered into this forum and saw the list of discussion titles.

    Why that worked to lure me in I can't say for sure.... but the fact that LF eventually landed me in obvious trouble certainly undercut my comfort level with the habits I'd acquired...
  • Suzanne_Pmonkey
    Suzanne_Pmonkey Posts: 387 Member
    @EbonyDahlia Thank you for sharing your story. I'm going to have to remember this the next time my will starts to waver. I have long been right under the pre-diabetic range for fasting glucose and my last test had my toe over the line. Mind you, I have been eating lowish carb (under 100g) for quite some time, albeit inconsistently. I just started keto about a week ago and I really feel like I can stick with it.
  • SuperCarLori
    SuperCarLori Posts: 1,248 Member
    edited January 2017
    Thank you for sharing. Very humbling. I think we all need a humility check now and again. Keeps kindness and compassion alive.

    Many blessings to you.
  • cimarrona27
    cimarrona27 Posts: 97 Member
    edited January 2017
    Thank you for sharing.

    I too have had co-workers not accept the seriousness of my disease. Once when they were going to order in they wanted to order from an Asian restaurant that I was unfamiliar with. I told them I had dietary restrictions because I was T2 and striving to be medication free.

    One of the girls said "I'm a type 1, you should just get the pump- then you can eat whatever you want. If I want a snickers, I eat one!" She was really snarky about it.

    I wanted to shout-
    "I don't want to live on medication! I am CAPABLE of managing this with diet and don't try to undermine my choice just because you want to bury your head in the sand and pretend a pump makes everything ok"

    Ok. Lol. Rant over.
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,020 Member
    That's a hard story but it's good to here. (hugs)
    RalfLott wrote: »
    @EbonyDahlia, in the different context of talking to other diabetics who aren't LC-awake (yet), is this pretty close to what you'd say?

    I've found that most people don't want to hear it. Most people are like my dad and believe what the doctor tells them, because ... well ... I don't have a medical degree and the doctor does. A few of my co-workers know I eat low carb, and they know this is a health choice because there is diabetes in my family, but most diabetics I've found don't want to hear it. And I've met a few. My dad would argue black and blue that fat was the cause of his raised sugar levels because this is what his "specialist" told him.

    Yeah... most don't want to hear it. The ones who do ask questions and are interested are the ones who are already looking into improving their own health.

    The others? It seems to sort of be in two camps: One camps sees giving up carbs as not living. I still need a dessert for happiness, right? The other group follows the doctors' advice blindly.... There are some in there that I have hope for. They might be willing to change if they see the right information presented the right way. The carb lovers (you can pry my sugar from my cold dead hands group) won't want to change, especially if they have blind faith in doctors.

    It took me almost a year of dabbling around LCHF before I took the plunge, because I was (am) a sugar lover, The main reason I changed is because I haven't had great medical care and I knew I had to take my health into my own hands. I wanted to learn. I like learning about health stuff.

    For someone who loved sugar as much as me to mostly give it up is a big move. My guess is that most won't be the types who want to take on the responsibility of their own health - starting with what seems like a really big sacrifice. KWIM? :(
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,056 Member
    edited January 2017
    Aha!

    Types of resistance -
    nvmomketo wrote: »

    The ones who do ask questions and are interested are the ones who are already looking into improving their own health. (Non-diabetic education resistant.)

    The others? It seems to sort of be in two camps: One camps sees giving up carbs as not living. I still need a dessert for happiness, right? (Type 1)

    The other group follows the doctors' advice blindly (Type 2)

    There are some in there that I have hope for. They might be willing to change if they see the right information presented the right way. (Type 2.5)

    The carb lovers (you can pry my sugar from my cold dead hands group) won't want to change (Type 1)

    especially if they have blind faith in doctors. (Type 3)

  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,020 Member
    RalfLott wrote: »
    Aha!

    Types of resistance -
    nvmomketo wrote: »

    The ones who do ask questions and are interested are the ones who are already looking into improving their own health. (Non-diabetic education resistant.)

    The others? It seems to sort of be in two camps: One camps sees giving up carbs as not living. I still need a dessert for happiness, right? (Type 1)

    The other group follows the doctors' advice blindly (Type 2)

    There are some in there that I have hope for. They might be willing to change if they see the right information presented the right way. (Type 2.5)

    The carb lovers (you can pry my sugar from my cold dead hands group) won't want to change (Type 1)

    especially if they have blind faith in doctors. (Type 3)

    LOL Let's just say they are the type who haven't seen the light yet.
  • bjwoodzy
    bjwoodzy Posts: 593 Member
    I do not have the luxury of "cheat days" or "falling off the wagon" and having a good old "oh well" laugh about it. My possible future is very real. When people say to me at work in that snarky tone (while stuffing their face with whatever cake was brought in that day) "oh aren't you good" inside I'm thinking "no, I'm not 'good' I'm terrified, I know what that crap will do to me".

    This hit close to home with me. My dad also died younger than he should have, sick and tired with horrible diabetes and on top of it, his brain addled by dementia. I feel for you, very much. I am also one of those people who tries to have a very militant attitude about what I put into my mouth and can tend to come off as bitchy to others who don't take it as seriously as I do, but I've seen the damage firsthand, just as you have. This is not fun and games for a lot of us, we know what troubled paths that other "normal" eating/lifestyles have led us and/or our loved ones down, and we don't want to screw around with our lives, either.

    GOOD FOR YOU for starting keto when you did, and am super happy for your losses (really, gains)!

  • bjwoodzy
    bjwoodzy Posts: 593 Member
    RalfLott wrote: »
    It seems like even open-minded people need to hear a new message again and again before it even penetrates their consciousness, let alone gets them thinking about changing their behavior.

    "Low-carb awake" - I like this term. I think that, unfortunately, too many LCHF-ers who do this to try it out or just jumping on the bandwagon but haven't yet experienced a tragic health issue (or loved ones with any) are only "awake" when something like that does happen. I wish I had only found this WOL 15 years ago, before I was on my way to 400+ BG I didn't even know I had, and un-diagnosed prolonged hyperglycemia that led to: a leg infection that has scarred my entire shin for life, not to mention the peripheral neuropathy in my feet, just to name a couple things.

  • jane1655
    jane1655 Posts: 3 Member
    I love that you are being proactive and managing the diabetes that is genetic in your family. I too manage this disease. I was insulin dependent for 10 years. In the spring I had Gastric by Pass surgery and am now insulin FREE. This is my second chance. (not a get out of jail FREE card) I have always been careful with what I eat, low carb diet for years control my disease without drugs. I had a pancreatitis attach 10 years ago and after that became insulin dependent. I became very overweight and my body became insulin resistant over 10 years of taking two shots a day. Last summer I started a program to get ready for weight loss surgery. Lost 30lb before 40lb since. I learn I was so afraid of my sugar dropping I carried food in my purse, my car... I would over eat at meals because you cant let the sugar drop. Even though I was not eating the sugar I was over eating. Had to change my behaviors. I never exercised and now I do 300 min of cardio in a week. I Make exercise my priority to Television, Reading or other sitting activities. Keep up the good work and Never be afraid to say NO THANK YOU!! I give no reason or excuses. If people get hurt because you dont have a piece of the cake they made/bought - that is their problem.
  • rmac18
    rmac18 Posts: 187 Member
    Thanks for sharing. I was diagnosed T2D in June and I tested BG after every meal and logged everything I ate. It became obvious the impact of carbs on BG so I went Keto. Since then I’ve had good success keeping my BG under 100 mg/dl and I’ve lost over 40 lbs. You are correct in that many others don’t want to hear it. I have blood tests in 3 weeks and am optimistic my A1c levels will be much improved. Good luck to you in your journey. Do it for yourself and don’t worry about what others think.
  • chelny
    chelny Posts: 179 Member
    I’m in a similar situation. I’m not sure how old my granddad or my mom were when diagnosed with diabetes. I am, like you, avoiding carbs and working to postpone sickness & medications as long as possible. People don’t understand, and I wish work was not so food-oriented. But I stand my ground and just repeat “no thank you”. Be strong.