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Hi everyone

handyrunnerhandyrunner Member Posts: 32,665 Member Member Posts: 32,665 Member
Hi all, I havnt started eating Primal yet..just started reading the Primal Blueprint and I am encouraged by what Im reading. I was reading some success stories and that is extremely encouraging as well. While I feel great right health wise, I am still not at my goal and I dont want to slip, I think this may be the way to go for sustainment.

A question though...I havnt read yet about the excercise yet but it's hinting a shorter bursts of cardio. Are there any longer distance runners out there and if so how do you approach your training for these distance and marry it up with the primal blueprint laws?

Replies

  • DragonwolfDragonwolf Member Posts: 5,631 Member Member Posts: 5,631 Member
    Paleo and Primal favors low-level cardio (ie - walk a lot) and brief high-intensity sessions (ie - sprinting) over sustained steady-state cardio, because that type of sustained cardio causes too much stress on the body, especially over long periods of time. It takes a toll on the immune system and has a high injury rate. Long-distance running is also highly catabolic (muscle-eating), and losing muscle means less functional strength for other tasks and a (slightly) lower metabolism. These things run counter to the goals of Paleo/Primal, so they're generally advised against, at least under the pretense of "getting healthier."

    That said, I know PrimalRunner was doing long-distance running for a while (don't know if she still is, since she's doing a bulk phase), so she might be able to offer some specific advice. There are also a number of athletes that follow a Paleo or Paleo-esque ketogenic diet. Some will "carb up" beforehand with Paleo foods (namely sweet potatoes), while others won't, and their in-race fuel is often things like cheese or other high-fat items. As far as I know, most of them train in keto, even if they carb up for races. One big thing I noticed is that running while in ketosis (and for some, probably even at lower carb non-keto levels), is that you really have to make sure you get enough water. Lower carbs means lower glycogen and less water stored within the body, so you have to get hydration from somewhere.
  • Julie7741Julie7741 Member, Premium Posts: 99 Member Member, Premium Posts: 99 Member
    I'm interested to see what information you get... I'm a runner too, and distance cyclist. I'm just starting this plan as well to help combat some medical issues that I've been having. What I will be doing is similar to paleo, though my doctor didn't call it that. I don't plan on giving up my two favorite forms exercise. My plan is to increase carbs with things like sweet potatoes and bananas instead of the traditional runner's fare (pasta, bread, etc.).

    I have seen big improvements in my immune system since I started cycling and running. I have far fewer colds and minor illnesses. I think one within the past two years. From what I've read, you can have a slight decrease in immune function in the hours immediately following a long distance run (or ride), but long term it boosts immunity. I guess it depends on whether you read runner's world or Paleo 101:smile:

    An any rate, good luck, and I think the two can be combined. I'm going to give it a try, and I'm going to see what other information you get.
  • handyrunnerhandyrunner Member Posts: 32,665 Member Member Posts: 32,665 Member
    Well so far Ive been reading around and it seems like a lot of runners are ignoring the aspect and continuing their training. They are also taking the same approach as you in where their carbs come from pre race and that makes sense to me, will likely do the same. What concerns me now is that a lot are forgoing any fueling during the long runs trying to stimulate fat burning, etc. As some one who uses the blocks, its something that Ill have to consider going forward. I normally use them if Ill be runing over 90 minutes.
  • Julie7741Julie7741 Member, Premium Posts: 99 Member Member, Premium Posts: 99 Member
    I don't do that much true distance running (long enough that I would have to eat), but sometimes ride up to 50 miles at a time- a few hours. When I do that, I have to carry something on the bike because I take blood sugar medication. I like the Shot bloks better than the gel stuff. I hadn't considered that aspect... Can't really carry a banana or sweet potato on a bike very easily!! I'll probably still use the shot bloks as needed- or maybe there is something that is more natural. I don't know any other good solution. Maybe someone will have an idea.
  • Julie7741Julie7741 Member, Premium Posts: 99 Member Member, Premium Posts: 99 Member
    Handyrunner- I don't know why I didn't think of this before... Larabars! They are great. Quick source of carbs, and they are made of dates and nuts, nothing more. They will be what I carry on the bike from now on (when it's warm enough to start riding).

    My husband and I love them- I don't know why I didn't think of using them in place of the shot bloks.
  • handyrunnerhandyrunner Member Posts: 32,665 Member Member Posts: 32,665 Member
    Might be worth a try....Have to see how the insides handle it LOL
  • DragonwolfDragonwolf Member Posts: 5,631 Member Member Posts: 5,631 Member
    I have seen big improvements in my immune system since I started cycling and running. I have far fewer colds and minor illnesses. I think one within the past two years. From what I've read, you can have a slight decrease in immune function in the hours immediately following a long distance run (or ride), but long term it boosts immunity. I guess it depends on whether you read runner's world or Paleo 101:smile:

    Ironically, even Runner's World admits/acknowledges the strain long distance running has on the immune system and notes the difference between 5Ks and marathons - http://www.runnersworld.com/health/immune-it-all It even mentions to scale back your training runs and use HIIT, instead!
  • AllanMisnerAllanMisner Member, Premium Posts: 4,155 Member Member, Premium Posts: 4,155 Member
    Ben Greenfield went ketogenic and ran a couple of IronMan Triathlons. In each race, he bonked and had to fall back on simple carbs to finish. That said, he went well into the race (he was on the run), before he had to switch. You can get a lot of information from his podcasts on bengreenfieldfitness.com.
  • Julie7741Julie7741 Member, Premium Posts: 99 Member Member, Premium Posts: 99 Member
    My running probably doesn't qualify as "endurance" but my cycling would. I log the most miles on the bike during the summer months. There are less colds/flus going around that time of year... maybe that's why I haven't seen any immune issues. My running, which I do during the winter, would be considered moderate. I guess it's all a matter of perspective.

    Regardless, the running/cycling is working for me, so I'm sticking to it. I think exercise has to be about what you enjoy.
    Many endurance athletes have made this work for them, and there are resources for triathletes, marathoners, and cyclists. If pro endurance athletes can do it with the crazy amount of training they do, then surely I can make it work. I know that strict paleo followers won't agree because the strict program encourages a completely different type of exercise. That's fine, but I think this can be adapted and work for those of us into endurance sports. I think even a modified version would be a healthy switch for anyone.
  • justaspoonfulofsugarjustaspoonfulofsugar Member Posts: 587 Member Member Posts: 587 Member
    here is an article on Timothy Olson,ultra runner
    http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/the-running-blog/2013/oct/04/timothy-olson-ultrarunner-interview
    he is gluten free and mainly grain free
  • handyrunnerhandyrunner Member Posts: 32,665 Member Member Posts: 32,665 Member
    Thanks everyone for the links will check them out.
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