Slow Losers Unite!

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  • 40DayFit
    40DayFit Posts: 246 Member
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    LOVE the engagement on this thread. So great to learn from everyone's experiences. And I just got the best chuckle from the phrase "cicophant," @Christine_72!

    However flawed CICO may be (and as much as I resent the puritanical insistence upon ALL and ONLY CICO that assails so many newcomers to fat loss), I do find that if I'm overeating (in the hundreds of kcal over my estimated fatloss cals), I'm just not moving the scale.

    To test my actual skill in estimating my food intake, I took a week or so off from close tracking. I'm not able to use my usual scale this week, so I'm really interested to see what happens when I get back to it. I've recruited my sister for a three-day introduction to keto, so I'm back to tracking precisely so I can model for her what has worked for me.

    I THINK I'm still losing even without logging, but I want to keep the clarity and control of logging for the next long haul so I can keep moving in the right direction toward my goals. NSV? My family, who hasn't seen me since the summer, all commented that they could see that I've been reducing! Pretty awesome.
  • swezeytba
    swezeytba Posts: 624 Member
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    Karlottap wrote: »
    My theory, only FOR ME, is that my body was healing itself (of something I may never know) and losing weight was the last thing it wanted to do at the time. This is why I call them "Healing pauses".

    That's a good way to think about it. Just started with this WOE on 12/11 and lost a bunch the first week and have been holding steady since then. I'm sure I have done damage to my body with past yo-yo dieting, so maybe my body is healing itself right now. I'd like to think so!
  • asgentr
    asgentr Posts: 228 Member
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    I can say that my loss didn't match up to my CICO until I started keto. I'm now losing consistently a pound a week (sometimes more) while DROPPING 5 days of elliptical work. I still walk a lot (don't drive), but as a former NYer and non-driver, I always have. There was something downright WEIRD about my huge gain after giving birth do my daughter. I'm certain something about my pregnancy/parenting stress triggered my diabetic predisposition and caused the weight gain. After much research I'm convinced it is insulin levels that cause obesity and not the other way around.
  • 40DayFit
    40DayFit Posts: 246 Member
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    Saw a 5+ lbs drop on the scale after my last weigh-in a few weeks ago. Guess my fatlossometer isn't broken after all. The mental hijinx were interesting to observe, that's for sure. If I were orthorexic, I'd probably have been inventing all kinds of elaborate elimination diet rituals or rushing to fasting as a "fix it" measure. I'm grateful that I did none of those things.

    I do wonder how many proponents of strict elimination diets or fasts are masking orthorexia in scientific language and convincing n=1 outputs? Some of the FB groups I'm in have some hardcore folks who post frequently, have a lot of cache in their groups, and advocate some very high-bar methods. I'm glad when people find what works for them, and I also know how desperate the mind can get when the scale isn't moving. Oh well.

    I know I'm doing okay with my eating; now it's time for movement. Hopefully I can build in gym time into my schedule--but I know I can get in a 20-min daily walk.
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
    edited January 2017
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    40DayFit wrote: »
    Saw a 5+ lbs drop on the scale after my last weigh-in a few weeks ago. Guess my fatlossometer isn't broken after all. The mental hijinx were interesting to observe, that's for sure. If I were orthorexic, I'd probably have been inventing all kinds of elaborate elimination diet rituals or rushing to fasting as a "fix it" measure. I'm grateful that I did none of those things.

    I do wonder how many proponents of strict elimination diets or fasts are masking orthorexia in scientific language and convincing n=1 outputs? Some of the FB groups I'm in have some hardcore folks who post frequently, have a lot of cache in their groups, and advocate some very high-bar methods. I'm glad when people find what works for them, and I also know how desperate the mind can get when the scale isn't moving. Oh well.

    I know I'm doing okay with my eating; now it's time for movement. Hopefully I can build in gym time into my schedule--but I know I can get in a 20-min daily walk.

    Orthorexia?? .....

    Whoa! :s

    Here's a snippet from the Wikipedia article
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthorexia_nervosa:

    (Not a word to my sister about this!)
    In 2016, formal criteria In 2016, formal criteria for orthorexia were proposed in the peer-reviewed journal Eating Behaviors by authors Dr Thom Dunn of the University of Northern Colorado, and Steven Bratman. These criteria are as follows:

    Criterion A. Obsessive focus on "healthy" eating, as defined by a dietary theory or set of beliefs whose specific details may vary; marked by exaggerated emotional distress in relationship to food choices perceived as unhealthy; weight loss may ensue, but this is conceptualized as an aspect of ideal health rather than as the primary goal.

    As evidenced by the following:

    Compulsive behavior and/or mental preoccupation regarding affirmative and restrictive dietary practices believed by the individual to promote optimum health. (Footnotes to this criteria add: Dietary practices may include use of concentrated "food supplements." Exercise performance and/or fit body image may be regarded as an aspect or indicator of health.)

    Violation of self-imposed dietary rules causes exaggerated fear of disease, sense of personal impurity and/or negative physical sensations, accompanied by anxiety and shame.

    Dietary restrictions escalate over time, and may come to include elimination of entire food groups and involve progressively more frequent and/or severe "cleanses" (partial fasts) regarded as purifying or detoxifying. This escalation commonly leads to weight loss, but the desire to lose weight is absent, hidden or subordinated to ideation about healthy food.

    Criterion B. The compulsive behavior and mental preoccupation becomes clinically impairing by any of the following:

    Malnutrition, severe weight loss or other medical complications from restricted diet

    Intrapersonal distress or impairment of social, academic or vocational functioning secondary to beliefs or behaviors about healthy diet

    Positive body image, self-worth, identity and/or satisfaction excessively dependent on compliance with self-defined "healthy" eating behavior.

    Silver lining - it's not in the DSM.
  • canadjineh
    canadjineh Posts: 5,396 Member
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    @RalfLott & @40DayFit - only if Criterion B is met, otherwise, it's just healthy eating which is certainly NOT a mental disorder.
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
    edited January 2017
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    canadjineh wrote: »
    @RalfLott & @40DayFit - only if Criterion B is met, otherwise, it's just healthy eating which is certainly NOT a mental disorder.

    Ha! I'm still flunking.

    My wife would say yep to the interpersonal & social impairment option, since I won't even taste the coven of yummy, vile desserts my SIL trots out every Xmas. :p
  • 40DayFit
    40DayFit Posts: 246 Member
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    I think folks with disordered thoughts & behaviors around food can know this about themselves, if not innately then with some gentle counseling for insight. Certainly healthy eating is not itself a disorder! And yet the obsession and strong reactions/rituals/need for exact control for those who do have issues in this area are worth noting.

    In some of what I see people post online, there's room for pause. Of course like finds like online, and there are entire communities built around these things. For me it's important to notice the mental machinations I flirted with at the margins of my thoughts as the scale refused to budge. It's data, for sure. Because very little might separate me from folks who DO go to extremes except my commitment to witness and manage my reactions.

    I wonder if anyone else finds themselves thinking about fasting, deeper calorie restriction, or other do-it-quick measures when the scale gets stubborn?
  • canadjineh
    canadjineh Posts: 5,396 Member
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    @40DayFit... fasting isn't actually the whackjob idea you might think it is. ;)https://intensivedietarymanagement.com/understanding-joseph-kraft-diabetes-in-situ-t2d-24/
    Nephrologist Dr. Jason Fung's website. Canadian doctor turning T2D around. Lots of patients, long history of success. https://intensivedietarymanagement.com/people/
  • 40DayFit
    40DayFit Posts: 246 Member
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    Not saying fasting is a whack job idea. I am saying that people feeling desperate about immediate fatloss on the scale may/do turn to fasting as a quick fix. That urgency and seeking behavior is problematic. I know how it can feel--and acting out to seek rapid weight loss needs to be recognized and addressed.

    Fasting in an informed and mindful way with clarity and realistic goals is altogether different. Replace "fasting" with "ephedra," "stimulants," etc and my point remains the same.
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
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