Thanksgiving

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Replies

  • hansep0012
    hansep0012 Posts: 383 Member
    My Thanksgiving day and long weekend went well for me as far as CICO and choices. I am proud of myself for thinking about it ahead of time, remaining flexible, and being moderate.
  • conniewilkins56
    conniewilkins56 Posts: 3,390 Member
    Good job!...I planned but didn’t follow thru with my plan!
  • I did fairly well, or so I thought until my Gout Flareup! Holy *kitten*!
  • maiomaio71
    maiomaio71 Posts: 231 Member
    Oh no! Hope it goes away quickly.
  • maiomaio71
    maiomaio71 Posts: 231 Member
    Question for all you Thanksgiving celebrators. Do you put the same emphasis on Christmas food as Thanksgiving? So you would have two major celebrations in two months? Or is Christmas dinner/lunch less of a "thing" because you've already celebrated Thanksgiving with all your extended family? Just wondering how it all works. Must be expensive too! Do you generally do one celebration with the whole whanau and then the other with just close whanau?
  • merph518
    merph518 Posts: 701 Member
    edited December 2019
    Christmas dinner is about the same level as Thanksgiving for our family, though it's not usually based around a big turkey :)

    We usually just celebrate with my inlaws, so my wife's folks, her brother and his family, and our family. We each bring some dishes so it winds up not being too expensive of an endeavor. I think how people celebrate each holiday is pretty unique, so you're not likely to find one answer that would fit for most!

    First time I've ever seen the term 'whanau', TIL a new word for extended family.
  • conniewilkins56
    conniewilkins56 Posts: 3,390 Member
    You can go all out and spend a fortune or else downsize...every family has their own traditions....thanksgiving is our daughters birthday and our granddaughters is the day after Christmas so it’s always expensive lol
  • maiomaio71
    maiomaio71 Posts: 231 Member
    Ooops yes whanau means family. Sorry. Common word here. (Pronounced far-no). I guess my questions stem from the fact you don't have a long Xmas holiday like we do (school is out Dec 20-Jan 20) so Xmas is a major celebration here because everyone is on holiday and it's summer. Plus we don't have Thanksgiving. I wondered if Thanksgiving was extended family-oriented and Xmas closer family and smaller, given that it followed after Thanksgiving. Not that it was less important but just different? I'm kinda jealous you have these cool traditions that we don't! Not jealous that I don't have to battle more food celebrations though. I get lots of cultural envy. Don't mind me.
  • conniewilkins56
    conniewilkins56 Posts: 3,390 Member
    Christmas break for school is about two weeks...the only real difference in the two holidays is gift giving...celebrations are large and small for both..attending church or Mass is usually at Christmas and not Thanksgiving...
  • hansep0012
    hansep0012 Posts: 383 Member
    For my family food was and is a central theme for each holiday. On my mom's side it stemmed from very humble (poor) roots where there was often times throughout the year when the family went to bed hungry. To celebrate the prosperity of better economic times a large meal was served and shared.

    Thanksgiving always featured a roasted turkey and if there were many guests my grandmother would also serve ham. Christmas dinner was beef, the best cut the family could afford given the number of people at the table. The list goes on: New Year's Eve is fish, Easter is lamb, 4th of July steaks on the grill.

    My dad, being from India was amazed and blown away by the abundance of food and the expertise of my mom's French family in preparing the meals. He was swept into the holiday "tradition" of an extravagant holiday meal, the joy of sharing it with family and friends, and the expectation of culinary mastery of every dish.

    Interesting to me is that my family treated Christmas as a secular holiday (Jesus was not the reason for the season, so to speak) and it was much later in my childhood that I learned there are other reasons to celebrate holidays, not just the feasting and time off.