Form critique thread, post your videos here.

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Replies

  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
    You're correct. I wouldn't worry about hyperextension of the lower back. It's very slight - I wouldn't even really call it "hyper"extension, just a slight arch which is probably fairly close to normal, I'd think - and seems to be just from hip drive.

    You can keep an eye on it, though. If it gets worse (especially with heavier weight), then it might be something to look into further. But for now, keep on training and getting used to the low-bar feel. I'd think that just some more time with it, and focusing on those cues you're focusing on - will get you used to it such that it'll not be an issue.
  • PocketPoodle
    PocketPoodle Posts: 32 Member
    TR0berts wrote: »
    You're correct. I wouldn't worry about hyperextension of the lower back. It's very slight - I wouldn't even really call it "hyper"extension, just a slight arch which is probably fairly close to normal, I'd think - and seems to be just from hip drive.

    You can keep an eye on it, though. If it gets worse (especially with heavier weight), then it might be something to look into further. But for now, keep on training and getting used to the low-bar feel. I'd think that just some more time with it, and focusing on those cues you're focusing on - will get you used to it such that it'll not be an issue.

    Thank you, that's good to hear. That's also what my thoughts were, it did feel like it was the hip drive causing it. I will keep an eye on it and keep training low bar. I can actually kind of enjoy squats now, it's amazing!
  • DopeItUp
    DopeItUp Posts: 18,771 Member
    DopeItUp wrote: »
    Those are some beautiful squats. How did it feel?

    By the way, one of the best decisions I ever made was swapping to the other side of my squat rack so I can't see myself in the mirror. Gotta concentrate on what your body is doing, not what you're looking at. IMO. Helped my form a lot.

    Thank you!! Actually, it felt much more natural than high bar - it was a bit of a light bulb moment. I will definitely stick with low bar for now. I also think it's easier to focus on how the squats feel without the mirror.

    The only thing I noticed from looking at the video was how my back sort of hyper extends (is that the term?) on the way up. Is that of any concern? I tried to focus on keeping my upper back tight and "present a more horizontal back angle", and on driving my hips up, so maybe I lost a bit of concentration on my lower back. Am I overthinking? :expressionless:

    Yes, you are overthinking it, I can't even find anything to nitpick about. Hell I wish my squats looked that good.
  • PocketPoodle
    PocketPoodle Posts: 32 Member
    DopeItUp wrote: »
    DopeItUp wrote: »
    Those are some beautiful squats. How did it feel?

    By the way, one of the best decisions I ever made was swapping to the other side of my squat rack so I can't see myself in the mirror. Gotta concentrate on what your body is doing, not what you're looking at. IMO. Helped my form a lot.

    Thank you!! Actually, it felt much more natural than high bar - it was a bit of a light bulb moment. I will definitely stick with low bar for now. I also think it's easier to focus on how the squats feel without the mirror.

    The only thing I noticed from looking at the video was how my back sort of hyper extends (is that the term?) on the way up. Is that of any concern? I tried to focus on keeping my upper back tight and "present a more horizontal back angle", and on driving my hips up, so maybe I lost a bit of concentration on my lower back. Am I overthinking? :expressionless:

    Yes, you are overthinking it, I can't even find anything to nitpick about. Hell I wish my squats looked that good.

    Haha, ok, thank you :flushed: I can be rather perfectionistic at times, and it does sometimes get in my way. Will squat and enjoy it, and keep adding weight to the bar. Thanks for your feedback!
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,068 Member
    @PocketPoodle
    Those low bar squats look great.
  • PocketPoodle
    PocketPoodle Posts: 32 Member
    SideSteel wrote: »
    @PocketPoodle
    Those low bar squats look great.

    Thank you!

  • jayemes
    jayemes Posts: 865 Member
    Just starting out with Strong Lifts 5x5 and I'd love to get a form critique while I'm still lifting relatively light and haven't let bad habits become ingrained.... thanks in advance for any advice!

    Deadlift with 95lbs
    https://youtu.be/pX6fdIwy3Uk

    Rows with 65lbs
    https://youtu.be/oPMoUpMN63I
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,842 Member
    Looks really good on most points, not a lot to work on I think.
    If you look at what happens to upper back when your head starts looking down too fast, and even otherwise to lesser extent, it appears you lost your back lock when your head tilts down on pause, and stays farther forward.
    Look at shoulder difference going up and coming down.
    As you keep going up in weight, you'll want that good form on way down too - unless you plan on dropping it and missing the eccentric workout.
    Keeping back/shoulders locked up and down. That will itself help with good form too.

    Can really only discern flat back on the rows over the plates, which is good.
    Are you taking the slack out of the bar/plates before the pull?
    Always good idea before weight goes up.
  • jayemes
    jayemes Posts: 865 Member
    @heybales Thanks for the info. I'll definitely watch my shoulders and focus on them and staying straighter. I know I take the slack out on my dead lifts but I don't think I was on my rows, so I'll make sure to do it then also. THANK YOU!
  • geekyjock76
    geekyjock76 Posts: 2,720 Member
    I suffered a few herniated discs about 20 years ago and, since then, added more injuries to the list. To prevent further injuries I thought it might be beneficial for others to critique my form.

  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,842 Member
    Good calluses.
    Is bar really over mid-foot?
    From camera angle and seeing back of foot, it doesn't appear it could be, but perhaps it is.

    Suggest don't stare at self in mirror - head to back straight, so head tilts as back tilts in solid line. That can help aim for bar path to mid-foot again. Perhaps it's being used to help keep back flat.

    Not sure if shoulders hunched over that bad or not, but don't appear to be locked back totally.

    Good angle on arms and hips at start.
    Good drag of bar up and down thigh/shins, knee bends after bar passes.
    Appears safe enough from viewing just one video/angle.

    Safe enough angle for disc?
    Ehhh, body part sizes plays a part there, more vertical the spine less potential problem, but femur length plays a part there, as well as feet spread and angle out of knees to reduce that.

    Also depends on reason for the lifting - power and high weights, or strength and strong muscles groups.
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,210 Member
    I agree about keeping your head & back straight. If you have a hard time breaking the habit of looking forward, try biting your shirt to keep your chin down.

    Also.. i'd pause longer between reps, relax a bit, and visually check that the bar hasn't drifted from where it needs to be. Basically treat each rep like it's a 1-rep set. :+1:
  • geekyjock76
    geekyjock76 Posts: 2,720 Member
    heybales wrote: »
    Good calluses.
    Is bar really over mid-foot?
    From camera angle and seeing back of foot, it doesn't appear it could be, but perhaps it is.

    Suggest don't stare at self in mirror - head to back straight, so head tilts as back tilts in solid line. That can help aim for bar path to mid-foot again. Perhaps it's being used to help keep back flat.

    Not sure if shoulders hunched over that bad or not, but don't appear to be locked back totally.

    Good angle on arms and hips at start.
    Good drag of bar up and down thigh/shins, knee bends after bar passes.
    Appears safe enough from viewing just one video/angle.

    Safe enough angle for disc?
    Ehhh, body part sizes plays a part there, more vertical the spine less potential problem, but femur length plays a part there, as well as feet spread and angle out of knees to reduce that.

    Also depends on reason for the lifting - power and high weights, or strength and strong muscles groups.
    I notice that I'm inconsistent with my neck posture and I tend to do it more when I record videos. May have to bring the tennis ball and tuck it under the chin until I break the habit. But when I do keep my neck in neutral alignment I observe the bar remains over mid foot and I feel the plates contact the same place on the platform.

    Good observation on the shoulders as I feel my lower back tightening after a few sets. I recently tore something on my posterior shoulder-something involved in external rotation, abduction and adduction. Even though it's not involved in deadlifts, I'm too cautious in activating the muscle(s) in question.

    Regarding my spine, I have a severe lardotic curve. So much that I look pregnant when my body fat exceeds 12-13%.

  • geekyjock76
    geekyjock76 Posts: 2,720 Member
    edited April 2018
    Second video trying to keep neck tucked and scapula retracted. Had help recording frim better angle. I notice right before the plates touch the mat, my scapula starts to protract.
  • fanncy0626
    fanncy0626 Posts: 7,046 Member
    I have a question about progressive overload with my Kettlebell. In the past I did stronglift 5x5 but have become a snowbird so travel makes using the Kettlebell very convenient. I’m a 62 yo woman I weigh about 130# with around 20% bf. I follow Pavel Tsatsouline’s Strongfirst program with tweeks that work for me. I am in the middle of the 5 week program and am transitioning from swinging my 40# Kettlebell to my 45# Kettlebell by swinging the 45 every 4th set. My question is do I need a day of rest for muscle recovery now that I am swinging this heavier weight? 5# is a huge weight increase and I know I might have to repeat this 5week program. Any advice would be appreciated!
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,842 Member
    You mean you haven't been giving a day of rest after a hard lifting workout?

    If you were able to overload the muscles and cause damage that requires growth such that they need repair - that is done in the 24-48 hrs after the workout.

    If they don't recover you can easily get into situation to where next workout is not as good as it could have become - slowly not becoming an overload - or progress slowing down massively compared to what it could be.

    Only when lifting known lighter weight, like finding your working weight with new rep/set range (and that's why constantly changing just for the save of "muscle confusion" is a waste of time) could allow day after day to be useful.

    Get those rest days in there.
    Suggest using a rep range to keep that current weight more difficult, until you increase it and drop reps to start over.
  • fanncy0626
    fanncy0626 Posts: 7,046 Member
    I am doing progressive overload. I have a 5 week program starting at 10 sets increasing to 25 but deloading weekly and going back up. Then I increased the weight of my Kettlebell and started over. Pavel used the Kettlebell to train Olympic bodybuilders to help them increase their lift amounts. He said that you can swing it every day. It strengthens the muscle fibers. I know that with weight lifting I rested every other day. But, that was to be able to up the weight amount and muscle repair. This exercise isn’t supposed to be ripping or tearing muscle like weight lifting. It’s scientifically different as to the affect it has on muscle tissue. I agree with you though that since I’m asking the question I must feel the need for a rest day. Thanks for responding. Not many people that I know follow Pavel’s program so no one to get advice from.