Karate?

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  • peuglow
    peuglow Posts: 684 Member
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    lol I eat boxers for lunch.

    I'd recommend getting into some more effective striking and grappling techniques if you're into combat. If not, Karate is fine.
    If MMA has taught the world anything, it's that boxing doesn't work when you are on the ground.
    Agreed!

    I haven't ever taken a stylized class like Karate. The closest I've come to that is Judo. But I'm a muay Thai practioner, BJJ student, and fighter. Like I said, if you're in to combat check out some different styles. If not, enjoy. Just my opinion.
  • MattTheWaterRat
    MattTheWaterRat Posts: 167 Member
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    @_the_feniks_ & Pualana, I've never seen Wado-Ryu. Is it a softer style?

    @ReesesPuffs, I'm sorry to hear your experience was so unpleasant. I usually recommend people sit in on classes before participating so they get to see the teacher(s) and students in action.

    @MattTheWaterRat, you are the first person I've heard of who was "heavy" into Karate and Kung Fu that I've heard of recommending against getting involved in contact sports. Most schools of martial arts don't allow full contact sparring until the student is well versed in self defense. In many cases, students can opt out of full contact sparring. Do people get hurt? Absolutely. Is it preventable? For the most part, yes.

    In my experience, the crazies are everywhere and not more so in martial arts than any other activity. For instance, I was involved in a car club for a while and the percentage of freaks was higher than any martial arts group I've ever been involved in. Guys who argue for hours on end about petty details and get their knickers in a knot over nothing. I've been with my kids as they've participated in their chosen activities throughout their teenage years. The groups they were involved with had their fair share of crazies as well.

    It seems like the human state seems to bring about a certain level of crazies and nothing prevents it...

    The amount of crazies is kind of relative. I would think a motorcycle club may have more than a book club (but not always).

    The point I didn't get to, was that there are a lot of MA people living a fantasy. No doubt every traditional MA school will sell you some "technique" that is "street effective". So long as someone stabs at you like a robot in slow motion, you may be an expert in self-defense.

    In all the traditional MA schoolsI went to, the sparring was like a repetitive game of tag with no force being used. Obviously you can't practice throat chopping, but prancing around gives you a lot of false-confidence.

    I can say that MMA gyms do practice at full speed/strength, which can give you a more realistic view of what a fight actually is. That being said, the more "real" you get, the more injuries there are. Lots of MMA guys get their bodies torn up.

    You seem like a nice guy, Uncle Mac, judging by your dog picture. Why on earth would you want to learn something that hurts people?
  • travisseger
    travisseger Posts: 271 Member
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    My oldest daughter is heavily involved in martial arts and really wants me to join her. She is currently a brown belt in Tong Hop Moo Sool - a style which combines Tae Kwon Do, Judo, Shotokan, Shorinryu, and Hapkido. They also work in Ju-Jitsu, Aikido, Kickboxing, and some other influences. It's very street-oriented, not competition based, which I really like. I like knowing she will be able to handle herself in the real world, not be one of these people that look good in a competition but have no clue what to do should they be attacked on the street.

    I'd love to start taking it one day. Just need to find the time and the finances.

    And, oh yeah, I pity the guy who is strictly a boxer and tries to take a well-rounded martial artist on. Wouldn't even be a fair fight.
  • trackercasey76
    trackercasey76 Posts: 780 Member
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    Love My TaeKwonDo class! Absolutely the BEST thing I have done for my self in regards to my health!! We do Traditional Korean forms, with a lot of sparring, heavy bag cardio,self defense and Jiujitsu mixed in. We spar at least once or twice a month and try to hit as many tournaments as possible. I HIGHLY recommend getting in to some type of martial art.
  • UncleMac
    UncleMac Posts: 13,122 Member
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    The amount of crazies is kind of relative. I would think a motorcycle club may have more than a book club (but not always).

    The point I didn't get to, was that there are a lot of MA people living a fantasy. No doubt every traditional MA school will sell you some "technique" that is "street effective". So long as someone stabs at you like a robot in slow motion, you may be an expert in self-defense.

    In all the traditional MA schoolsI went to, the sparring was like a repetitive game of tag with no force being used. Obviously you can't practice throat chopping, but prancing around gives you a lot of false-confidence.

    I can say that MMA gyms do practice at full speed/strength, which can give you a more realistic view of what a fight actually is. That being said, the more "real" you get, the more injuries there are. Lots of MMA guys get their bodies torn up.

    You seem like a nice guy, Uncle Mac, judging by your dog picture. Why on earth would you want to learn something that hurts people?
    One advantage to being a bit older is perspective. MMA started off as "tough guy" contests... no particular training required, just the willingness to step into the ring... In many cases, the local tough guy got his *kitten* handed to him by someone who trained. Injuries were common. Many people figured it was brutal (it was!) and should be banned (in some case, it was!) yet somehow, they defied the odds and although they're not mainstream yet, they're close. Nowadays, one can watch MMA on tv any day of the week.

    Injuries are part of any sport. Contact sports are no different. I haven't trained in MMA but I would think there is a limit as to how long a club could continue in operation if students are being seriously injured.

    I agree with you that giving people unrealistic expectations of the effectiveness of their training is irresponsible... almost as irresponsible as facing life's challenges without any kind of defense whatsoever.

    Why do I want to learn to hurt people? I am a nice guy and I love my family.

    The vast majority of society's members are law abiding citizens who pose no danger to themselves or others but I recognize that society will always have it's share of criminals who prey on others. I have no interest whatsoever in hurting anyone but if it is necessary for me to hurt someone to keep myself and my family safe, I will do what is necessary to protect myself and those I love... and I would not hesitate to do so...
  • Flyer615
    Flyer615 Posts: 173 Member
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    Was in Wado-Ryu with my kids a few years ago. Tore an ACL in a sparring competition at 1st brown belt. Stayed in for about another year through my 1st degree black belt (Shodan). My daughter went as far as Shodan and my son is a Nidan. He still practices in college but not for further belt advancement. I finally quit because gravity had too good a grip on me and I was afraid of getting hurt again. Since so much of the weight has left, I have been considering going back.
  • MattTheWaterRat
    MattTheWaterRat Posts: 167 Member
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    Why do I want to learn to hurt people? I am a nice guy and I love my family.

    The vast majority of society's members are law abiding citizens who pose no danger to themselves or others but I recognize that society will always have it's share of criminals who prey on others. I have no interest whatsoever in hurting anyone but if it is necessary for me to hurt someone to keep myself and my family safe, I will do what is necessary to protect myself and those I love... and I would not hesitate to do so...

    If you really want to protect your family, you should consider buying a gun, life insurance, or both.
  • peuglow
    peuglow Posts: 684 Member
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    Just because you like to learn a style of MA that is street effective doesn't mean you're looking to hurt people.

    Hell, I train in MMA because I like to challenge myself, I like to put myself to the test, and I enjoy learning. not because I like hurting people.

    edit: also, I've seen this style in action in the typical 'bar scene' where a gun would not have been safe to use.
  • trackercasey76
    trackercasey76 Posts: 780 Member
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    We train for street type fighting including Brutal arm breaks, throat punches, Takedowns, choke holds etc all while learning Traditional MA style fighting as well. I think it depends on the instructor, My instructor has fought Toughman, MMA and boxing as well as TKD at The Pan-Am games and the Junior Olympics.

    I Carry a gun to protect my family in a LIFE THREATENING situation I learn Self defense to better my self as well as protect myself and family from the douchbags that put us in bad but not deadly situations.
  • yeshualovesme
    yeshualovesme Posts: 121 Member
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    Our home is protected with firearms, and my hubby likes to carry... but honestly, a gun is not your go to choice if you need to subdue someone temporarily. I pray I never have to use anything I learn. One of our brown belt girls (before it become so Mcdojo-y) was attacked from behind in a college parking lot. He went to the hospital. Anyway, loved my MA training because I was abused growing up... it boosted my confidence and replaced my victim mentality. Worth it right there.
  • UncleMac
    UncleMac Posts: 13,122 Member
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    If you really want to protect your family, you should consider buying a gun, life insurance, or both.
    As others have commented, there are plenty of situations where a firearm would be overkill.

    yeshualovesme, I'm glad you survived your childhood abuse and thrived. Too often, victims never truly escape the trauma.