How to get better at running?

2

Replies

  • JessMason24
    JessMason24 Posts: 38 Member
    bump...
  • aaronlawrenc
    aaronlawrenc Posts: 666 Member
    tumblr_mj7xjobkpd1ql5yr7o1_400.gif
  • Doodlewhopper
    Doodlewhopper Posts: 1,017 Member
    Keep in mind that age is a big factor in running pace, though your times are impressive.

    Run hills. Run fartleks. Strengthen your core and legs. Include rest days, over training will diminish your gains. Properly fuel your runs.
  • Doodlewhopper
    Doodlewhopper Posts: 1,017 Member
    I am only a little faster than you are. I can for sure tell you that the longer runs increased my speed for the shorter runs. I did the half in 2:15. I also noticed the my push level dropped for the shorter runs even though they were faster. So, to get that back, I have started doing mixed speed runs and that seems to help. I give all I have for 2 miles, then do an easy 2, and then push it hard for a mile. The other day I did 2 miles in 15 minutes which was a record for me.

    This past Sunday I had a PR 10K from the 2 mile push, the mile easy, and another 2 mile push. When I was at the finish, I had nothing left. More details on my progress here.
    https://www.myfitnesspal.com/blog/dsjohndrow/view/finishing-is-winning-525584

    You can do it!

    Youre 54 years old and ran 2 miles in 15 minutes! Youre exceptional. Congrats.
  • scottb81
    scottb81 Posts: 2,538 Member
    Age is a factor, but a lot of the diminished physical capacity that was once thought to be from aging is now known to be mostly due to weight gain and diminished training.

    The best people in their 50s and beyond aren't going to beat the best people in ther 30s but most can do a whole lot more than they give themselves credit for if they want it and train for it.

    Take Ed Whitlock for example. He is obviosly very talented but he runs a 1:36 half marathon and 3:15 marathon at 80 years old. He does this by continuing to train hard and runs between 90 minutes and 3 hours every day at around a 9:00/mi pace. He also races a lot as his only speedwork.
  • hula808
    hula808 Posts: 228 Member
    From things Ive read, I've been under the impression its not good to run every day, that you need a rest day in between. Is this not right?
    Kind of changes everything...

    Run more, mostly at an easy pace.

    Run more - If you are running 3 times a week then progress will be slow. Run 4 times a week. Later, run 5, 6, or 7 days a week. Run twice a day sometimes.

    Mostly at an easy pace. Note that this does not say slow pace. Your easy pace might be slow now but if you train correctly the easy pace will get faster. Easy pace is generally between 70 and 80% max heartrate. If you are tired you can run slower than that and still make progress but progress will be slower.

    Running is built on aerobic capacity which is built by running a lot and running long often, mostly at an easy pace.

    Read this: Athletic Training by Arthur Lydiard, available free at http://www.lydiardfoundation.org/pdfs/al_training_eng.pdf
  • Lind5ay90
    Lind5ay90 Posts: 377 Member
    -Run more often...don't let yourself go a few days in between
    -Every month, up your distance even if it's by .08 of a mile
    -Slow your pace down.
    -For me, the first mile is the HARDEST. Push through it or if you have to walk, briskly walk and chalk that mile up to a warm up. You'll be amazed at how much further you can go when you pick up your pace again
  • Just_Jon
    Just_Jon Posts: 108 Member
    Definitely agree with checking out Hal Higdon's training plans. I've used them for many years. You'll find that the advanced plans will include interval training, pace runs, and tempo runs. I've found all of these helpful for increasing my speed. Another thing that helped was entering more races. Running a 5K every month improved my times immensely.

    Good luck!
  • Just_Jon
    Just_Jon Posts: 108 Member
    From things Ive read, I've been under the impression its not good to run every day, that you need a rest day in between. Is this not right?
    Kind of changes everything...

    Yes, you definitely need a rest day during the week. You may need two depending on your level of running and your age. Running at high intensity every day, without rest, is an invite for an injury.
  • hula808
    hula808 Posts: 228 Member
    Wholey eff! Funny!

    tumblr_mj7xjobkpd1ql5yr7o1_400.gif
  • scottb81
    scottb81 Posts: 2,538 Member
    From things Ive read, I've been under the impression its not good to run every day, that you need a rest day in between. Is this not right?
    Kind of changes everything...
    When you are first starting out you probably shouldn't run every day but as you get stronger you can run more. If you run easy, even if it is long, you can do it every day. Or if you run hard one day make the next day or two easy. Or if you run twice a day make sure one of the runs is really easy and not too long.

    Right now at 53 years old I run nearly ever day and often twice a day. Depending on how tired I get, sometimes I take a rest day once a week or go several weeks between rest days.

    The problem most people have is that they run too hard all the time requiring a lot of rest in between. You don't need to run that hard to get the benefit you are trying to get when building endurance. Running too hard all the time will limit progress because first, running hard leads to reduced running time and frequency, second, running hard does not train the aerobic slow twitch muscle fibers as well as running below 80% max heartrate, and third if you run hard all the time and run a lot you will overwhelm your body's ability to recover and stop making progress.

    Some hard running is required but not really very much. 80% or more of your weekly volume should be easy.
  • hula808
    hula808 Posts: 228 Member
    I had my a** kicked by an 85 year old in the last 10k. Awesomely inspirational...but still....I must have some room for improvement despite my ripe old age of 34 ; )

    Keep in mind that age is a big factor in running pace, though your times are impressive.

    Run hills. Run fartleks. Strengthen your core and legs. Include rest days, over training will diminish your gains. Properly fuel your runs.
  • mjpTennis
    mjpTennis Posts: 6,165 Member
    This is all such good information and stuff that is working for me (intervals, hills, running slow comfortable pace for me, running more and longer). Reading this good information has reminded me that I am trying to run too fast on my slow run days.

    Additionally, I took time to examine my running style and form. I had leveled out for a while and thought that I had topped out in speed. I spent some time comparing the gazelle running style and the glider running style. While I wasn't a graceful gazelle, I wasn't a fast one either. I am more comfortable with the glider running style especially for the longer distances. Since I have switched and focused on my form, I have dropped from an 8:30 minute mile pace down to almost a 7:30 min mile pace. Along with this change has come correcting where my foot is striking, hitting a 3 step per second cadence, but most of all - I am having more fun running. There is less impact to my body and I feel more rested while running and after running.

    I actually feel so good that my goals are to run my first official 10k, a half marathon, and a full marathon before the end of the calendar year.

    Here are a couple of videos around the styles for review:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=fvwp&v=wRkeBVMQSgg


    Hope you find what works for you.
  • bmoregan
    bmoregan Posts: 109 Member
    Good question and good thread. Bookmarked.
  • bluefox9er
    bluefox9er Posts: 2,945 Member
    Run more, mostly at an easy pace.

    Run more - If you are running 3 times a week then progress will be slow. Run 4 times a week. Later, run 5, 6, or 7 days a week. Run twice a day sometimes.

    Mostly at an easy pace. Note that this does not say slow pace. Your easy pace might be slow now but if you train correctly the easy pace will get faster. Easy pace is generally between 70 and 80% max heartrate. If you are tired you can run slower than that and still make progress but progress will be slower.

    Running is built on aerobic capacity which is built by running a lot and running long often, mostly at an easy pace.

    Read this: Athletic Training by Arthur Lydiard, available free at http://www.lydiardfoundation.org/pdfs/al_training_eng.pdf

    Scott is a genius! And great MFP friend.

    absolutely 100% this. I asked the same question about how to get faster, and scott delivered the same advice..so I did as he suggested and my 'times' are significantly faster.

    I am now in a happy medium where I 'enjoy' my runs as well as improving performance..and thats because I run more miles..lots and lots of them.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 40,859 Member
    Make sure you getting some interval work in there as well...where you're really pushing your max for whatever that particular interval period is. Intervals have helped me immensely in both speed and endurance.
  • arc918
    arc918 Posts: 2,037 Member
    More miles, more miles, more miles.

    FWIW - for a 1:45 half (~ 8:00 pace), your 5K should be down around 22 minutes (~7:15 pace)
  • Zekela
    Zekela Posts: 634 Member
    More miles, more miles, more miles.

    FWIW - for a 1:45 half (~ 8:00 pace), your 5K should be down around 22 minutes (~7:15 pace)

    I agree! Run more often. Also make sure your body is being nourished properly. Taking a rest day isn't all that essential in my books (I definitely don't and my speed have improved without injury). Cross training also helps. Listen to your body... if you are feeling slight muscle strains that may signal that you are doing too much. Cut back on the mileage at this point, then try again at that mileage in two or so weeks. This tends to work for me.
  • jenifr818
    jenifr818 Posts: 805 Member
    bump for future reference, even if it is a zombie thread ;-)