Who has a little dinghy?

iWaffle
iWaffle Posts: 2,208 Member
I found a small lake nearby that I could use to launch a small rowboat into. Does anyone else use this for upper body exercise? It looks like it would be a fantastic workout. Rowing builds strength and also functions as some type of cardio I'm sure. I can tell that this would be great for my arms and back.

Let me know if you have experience using a small dinghy and how it worked out for you.
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Replies

  • _noob_
    _noob_ Posts: 3,306 Member
    308e3hi.png

    I get my kayak wet as often as possible.
  • _crafty_
    _crafty_ Posts: 1,682 Member
    rowing . . . is that what we're calling it these days?
  • iulia_maddie
    iulia_maddie Posts: 2,780 Member
    BRB. Working on a list of people who have little dinghys. If we've interacted and you know i might put you on this list, you may PM me and i will erase your name from it.
  • BeachIron
    BeachIron Posts: 6,490 Member
    in for getting my oar wet
  • TylerJ76
    TylerJ76 Posts: 4,375 Member
    BRB. Working on a list of people who have little dinghys. If we've interacted and you know i might put you on this list, you may PM me and i will erase your name from it.

    I'm on that list FOR SURE
  • sz8soon
    sz8soon Posts: 816 Member
    I really prefer a bigger dinghy.

    funny_shape_boat_1001.jpg
  • NutellaAddict
    NutellaAddict Posts: 1,258 Member
    I thought it was about the motion of the dinghy in the water. not the size.
  • jcarnes66
    jcarnes66 Posts: 40 Member
    Define 'little'... :)
  • jcarnes66
    jcarnes66 Posts: 40 Member
    @ JackDiesel That would depend on the size of the 'canal' your dinghy is in!!
  • Fish_Fuzz
    Fish_Fuzz Posts: 90 Member
    As a person who makes a living with his dingy I will have to recommend that you use a paddle made of spruce. Also referred too as "hard wood" if you use anything like pine or balsa wood, after extended amounts of use the paddle will become too soft and start to droop. Pine and balsa are often referred to as "soft wood" so you will have a less effective stroke with soft wood than you would with hard wood making navigating your dinghy through a canal very cumbersome!
  • Doodlewhopper
    Doodlewhopper Posts: 1,018 Member
    I found a small lake nearby that I could use to launch a small rowboat into. Does anyone else use this for upper body exercise? It looks like it would be a fantastic workout. Rowing builds strength and also functions as some type of cardio I'm sure. I can tell that this would be great for my arms and back.

    Let me know if you have experience using a small dinghy and how it worked out for you.

    I have a fiberglass dink. Keel needs some fiberglass work. $100. FOB Beaumont, Texas.

    BTW that is not me or my dink in my profile pics....mine's bigger
  • MelsAuntie
    MelsAuntie Posts: 2,833 Member
    Better than a dinghy or a canoe...kayak. Nice upper body workout, maneuverable, fun.
  • sz8soon
    sz8soon Posts: 816 Member
    As a person who makes a living with his dingy I will have to recommend that you use a paddle made of spruce. Also referred too as "hard wood" if you use anything like pine or balsa wood, after extended amounts of use the paddle will become too soft and start to droop. Pine and balsa are often referred to as "soft wood" so you will have a less effective stroke with soft wood than you would with hard wood making navigating your dinghy through a canal very cumbersome!

    you really know a lot about dinghy's! And your expertise on wood is impressive!
  • Fish_Fuzz
    Fish_Fuzz Posts: 90 Member
    As a person who makes a living with his dingy I will have to recommend that you use a paddle made of spruce. Also referred too as "hard wood" if you use anything like pine or balsa wood, after extended amounts of use the paddle will become too soft and start to droop. Pine and balsa are often referred to as "soft wood" so you will have a less effective stroke with soft wood than you would with hard wood making navigating your dinghy through a canal very cumbersome!

    you really know a lot about dinghy's! And your expertise on wood is impressive!

    Why thank you it's nice to know I can share my years of experience to help out. Next week we talk about lower units .
  • MiloBloom83
    MiloBloom83 Posts: 2,723 Member
    My dinghy is average in length, but it's beam(or "girth") is above average. This increases stability and allows for long cardio burns, often leaving me exhausted on the weekends.
  • mmddwechanged
    mmddwechanged Posts: 1,688 Member
    As a person who makes a living with his dingy I will have to recommend that you use a paddle made of spruce. Also referred too as "hard wood" if you use anything like pine or balsa wood, after extended amounts of use the paddle will become too soft and start to droop. Pine and balsa are often referred to as "soft wood" so you will have a less effective stroke with soft wood than you would with hard wood making navigating your dinghy through a canal very cumbersome!

    ^this is true. However, with adequate stimulation, for example rubbing vigorously with a textured object, soft wood can become harder. There are also chemical remedies that give spruce a run for its' money!
  • karibrit
    karibrit Posts: 29
    @ JackDiesel That would depend on the size of the 'canal' your dinghy is in!!

    I’ve heard mariners spin tales of large expanses of water where they had to fling their dinghy about yet could never moor against port sides—forever adrift in a briny harbor.
  • NotRailMeat
    NotRailMeat Posts: 509 Member
    I have two "Dinghy's" and I choose the one that best fits the needs of a given situation.

    The first is long and narrow and best suited for when I want to work out by myself:

    outrigger%20canoe%20huki.jpg

    The other is designed for comfort and is always ridden by more than one person:

    inflatable-boats-image.jpg
  • NotRailMeat
    NotRailMeat Posts: 509 Member
    tn0_e48bd89f4f324f4e87b17695bc7a93b6.jpg