Share your "tricks" for staying on track.

2

Replies

  • SuckerPunch77
    SuckerPunch77 Posts: 23 Member
    So many great ideas and lots that i would have mentioned here but two really easy ones I did...and am thinking of doing again... is i OVERestimate the portion/calorie i'm recording and UNDERestimate the calorie burn on my activity.
  • waldo56
    waldo56 Posts: 1,872 Member
    Exercise every day.

    I'm the type that if I start skipping workouts, it just starts happening more and more until I only skip and never workout.

    I exercise at the same time every day, 7 days a week. Skipping is not acceptable, if I'm not physically capable of doing the workout I have planned, I can always walk on the treadmill for a bit to keep the habit strong.

    2.5 years now, not once did I skip a workout, the only sort of exception is when I had a broken toe and couldn't walk for 2 weeks.
  • molissep
    molissep Posts: 452 Member
    Some things that have helped me:
    1. I prelog the night before or in the morning. Then I know what I'm eating, how many calories I've consumed and what I have left if I'm hungry or craving something.

    2. If I don't buy it, I can't eat it. If there isn't junk food in my house then I won't be tempted to eat it - but as soon as I buy it and it's there I'll want it, wether I'm hungry or not.

    3. Plan ahead. I tend to food shop on Sunday, so before Sunday I plan my dinners for the upcoming week and make my grocery list based on that and the other typical staples that we keep on hand.

    4. Move as much as possible. I have a desk job and I spend at least 2 hours in the car. I've started going out during lunch, after I've eaten, even if I just go walk around the mall. It's getting me away from my desk and on my feet for at least 30 min. Also, once I get home from work I'm cooking and cleaning for at least 2 hours. The time goes so fast that I don't even realize I haven't sat down yet!

    5. No grazing/mindless eating. I was a notorious grazer. I'd get home from work and grab a handful of peanuts or a slice of cheese before I start cooking. Before I knew it, I was 5 handfuls deep. Now, I come home and start what needs to be done. I keep water or seltzer in arms reach rather than food.
  • Derf_Smeggle
    Derf_Smeggle Posts: 611 Member
    Some things that have helped me:
    1. I prelog the night before or in the morning. Then I know what I'm eating, how many calories I've consumed and what I have left if I'm hungry or craving something.
    Do you go back and adjust your entries if you eat more than you planned, or do you make an additional log entry for instance under snacks?
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,148 Member
    It sounds like there are other things going on and it is not the sugar. I am confident that you were not going through physical withdrawal from reducing your sugar intake. Set reasonable goals and you can still enjoy things like soda and ice cream. (P.S. Sugar is a carb)

    this x 10
  • Derf_Smeggle
    Derf_Smeggle Posts: 611 Member
    It sounds like there are other things going on and it is not the sugar. I am confident that you were not going through physical withdrawal from reducing your sugar intake. Set reasonable goals and you can still enjoy things like soda and ice cream. (P.S. Sugar is a carb)

    this x 10
    Yeahhhh... Missing the point of the thread. Share some of the methods you used when you started out your fitness plan, or that you use today. What were/are your speed bumps, stumbling blocks, etc.? What "tricks" did you have to use to avoid your personal pitfalls.
  • ThisCanadian
    ThisCanadian Posts: 1,086 Member
    I usually exercise in the morning. I find that I am much more likely to stay within my calorie limits on days that I exercise, so I try to exercise as soon as possible.
  • jennyc1270
    jennyc1270 Posts: 25 Member
    1.) I focus on the changes I have made as a "lifestyle" not a "diet". This is not temporary, but the way I am going to eat and exercise for the rest of my life

    2.) Portion control everything even if it takes more time or is more expensive. I do love my snack foods, but can sit down and eat a whole bag of chips or nuts or something. If I portion them out into ziplock bags that I know the calories for, it also makes it easier to calculate.

    3.) Log EVERYTHING.
  • goalss4nika
    goalss4nika Posts: 534 Member
    Short answer: I made it easy on myself, meaning I made it sustainable for the long haul.

    1. I set the bar low: a half-pound loss per week. (Over 66 weeks I averaged three-quarters of a pound/week. That includes faster loss in the beginning, slowing as I got closer to goal.)
    2. I used what I call "bridge foods" to deal with cravings. Here's an example:
    130219-substitutions.jpg
    Raisins gave me the sweetness I craved but not the fat of chocolate. However, they were still calorie-dense. I then moved from raisins to grapes and typically eat two cups of grapes after my workout.
    3. I kept powering through plateaus, including my longest plateau of 48 days. I did not further restrict, but kept following MFP. I kept doing the right things and waited everything out as my weight fluctuated up-down-up-down-up-down. I might feel impatient, but I never got discouraged. I kept telling myself that I'm in a much better place now than before I started all this.
    4. I made fitness as easy on myself as possible. I'm a caregiver and work out at home, on a mini-bike that's right here by my desk. Everything is within reach: equipment, music, water, towel.
    5. I take everything one day/meal/minute at a time. Recently I missed a workout session because we spent five hours in the ER. Fortunately things turned out well and I got right back to my schedule.
    6. I'm in this for health, period. As a friend told me, "If you go down, you both go down." It's that basic. I have much more stamina than before I started, and I'm in a much better place emotionally. That in itself is priceless motivation to continue.

    I describe my method in more detail in my MFP-1-year-anniversary entry from this past September:
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/1095703-mfp-1-year-anniversary


    Thank you for this! I would much rather have the chocolate lol
  • ruthrowlett1
    ruthrowlett1 Posts: 82 Member
    Great post! I totally fell off the wagon yesterday and reading these tips are helping me so much! I have 10 pounds until i go to maintenance and I'm struggling so much!!! Today is a new day and we WILL succeed! Good luck to all!!
  • HollisGrant
    HollisGrant Posts: 2,049 Member
    Processed sugar is my nemesis. I simply cannot eat a little bit of processed sugar, and when I do indulge I way overeat my calories for a few days following.

    My last "trick" I have mentioned in other posts. Cognitive-behavioral methods. Instead of using "I cannot have...", I use "I do not want... because [insert valid reason]". Starting out with the sugar, I was actually singing this out loud in the shower in the morning because I was craving a soda, and ice cream like a heroin fiend.

    "I do not want" is a great idea.

    I have the same problem with sugar, which in my case is the junk food and homemade cakes at my office. Once I start eating it I can't stop. I once taped a little sign on my computer monitor that said, "Put it down, fatty" that worked really well and made me laugh. I've also imagined gross things about the sweets -- a piece of hair in the cake, people who didn't wash their hands when they made it or licked their fingers. In fact, I'm getting sick just writing this.

    I love this video. I feel inspired all over again when I watch it:

  • HollisGrant
    HollisGrant Posts: 2,049 Member
    Short answer: I made it easy on myself, meaning I made it sustainable for the long haul.

    1. I set the bar low: a half-pound loss per week. (Over 66 weeks I averaged three-quarters of a pound/week. That includes faster loss in the beginning, slowing as I got closer to goal.)
    2. I used what I call "bridge foods" to deal with cravings. Here's an example:
    130219-substitutions.jpg
    Raisins gave me the sweetness I craved but not the fat of chocolate. However, they were still calorie-dense. I then moved from raisins to grapes and typically eat two cups of grapes after my workout.
    3. I kept powering through plateaus, including my longest plateau of 48 days. I did not further restrict, but kept following MFP. I kept doing the right things and waited everything out as my weight fluctuated up-down-up-down-up-down. I might feel impatient, but I never got discouraged. I kept telling myself that I'm in a much better place now than before I started all this.
    4. I made fitness as easy on myself as possible. I'm a caregiver and work out at home, on a mini-bike that's right here by my desk. Everything is within reach: equipment, music, water, towel.
    5. I take everything one day/meal/minute at a time. Recently I missed a workout session because we spent five hours in the ER. Fortunately things turned out well and I got right back to my schedule.
    6. I'm in this for health, period. As a friend told me, "If you go down, you both go down." It's that basic. I have much more stamina than before I started, and I'm in a much better place emotionally. That in itself is priceless motivation to continue.

    I describe my method in more detail in my MFP-1-year-anniversary entry from this past September:
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/1095703-mfp-1-year-anniversary


    Thank you for this! I would much rather have the chocolate lol

    Bridge foods are a great idea. Sometimes I buy chocolate soy milk for that reason. It has chocolate, tastes great, and is filling, so I get some chocolate but it is a lot better than a candy bar.
  • neandermagnon
    neandermagnon Posts: 7,446 Member
    I dont deprive myself of anything. Telling myself (or someone else telling me no) I can't have something only makes me want it more. I am rather defiant that way :happy: If I don't eat something, it's because I choose not to. Its the only thing that keeps me sane.

    I'm the same. :drinker: moderation works for me

    And heavy lifting. For fun. Because it's fun and I like being strong.
  • katethegreat1212
    katethegreat1212 Posts: 31 Member
    It is VERY possible to go through with drawl from reducing sugar intake!!! It is possible to go through ANY kind of carb with drawl, especially simple, process carbs. I think psychology is a GREAT idea. I need to try this.
  • LvLite
    LvLite Posts: 102 Member

    My last "trick" I have mentioned in other posts. Cognitive-behavioral methods. Instead of using "I cannot have...", I use "I do not want... because [insert valid reason]". Starting out with the sugar, I was actually singing this out loud in the shower in the morning because I was craving a soda, and ice cream like a heroin fiend.

    This made me laugh because I totally get it!! I remind myself that I DECIDE when, where, how and what I will eat, not my crazy sugar ogre which behaves exactly like a crack addict!

    My "tricks" besides changing the thinking:

    1. Having a 90% Cocoa square with fresh almond butter and planning when I am going to have it. It does not trigger me or cause binging for me and they are sooo yummy!
    2. I am a texture person and color eater.. so I feel happiest when I eat a rainbow of fresh foods and treat myself to a sweet potato
    3. I had to get a grip on my strengths and weaknesses, and I am ok with it. I have a picture in my head and do not listen to those who really don't understand the struggle.
    4. Brain research. Seriously. I am a nerd and there is a lot of interesting things that I have learned and motivate me

    :)
  • themedalist
    themedalist Posts: 3,093 Member
    I'm in maintenance now but I have a huge incentive to stay on track with my healthy eating and exercise habits: I don't EVER want to have to lose 50 pounds again. But I'm also getting over hip replacement surgery this summer and still have to do daily physical therapy exercises, which I'm completely bored with and dislike. That's in addition to my regular exercise which I do enjoy.

    I was having trouble motivating myself to keep at the PT. After thinking about it a lot, I realized I really like incentives and rewards. I participate in 3 exercise rewards programs and it really keeps me motivated. So, I decided to reward myself and pay myself for exercising, especially the physical therapy exercises. I also scope out some health goals for each month (such as walking at least 6000 steps a day) and pay myself $20 at the end of the month if I've reached my goals. I don't pay myself every time I exercise, just when I need a little boost. Or, say, achieve a new milestone such as going up on the weights. I decide when and how much it's worth to me. Simply adding on $5 or $10 cash back to my grocery and drug store trips gives me all the money I need for my reward system. My "Health Fund" now stands at $85. Might use the money for a special dinner out or another fitness gadget. Not sure yet. But it's mine, all mine, to use as I wish and this system is yet another way that I keep myself on track.
  • dejavuohlala
    dejavuohlala Posts: 1,815 Member
    I like your logic and glad to hear you are doing it 'your way'

    good luck with your journey
  • enidite
    enidite Posts: 93 Member
    Great thread. I love all the great ideas.
    Mine are portion control. I also limit processed foods and eat a lot of fresh foods.
    Exercise , I have found it helps me a lot especially when I feel like bingeing ( I am unfortunately an emotional eater which can be an uphill battle sometimes.).
    Setting realistic goals, I didn't put 100+ lbs on overnight, they won't come off overnight, therefore, I also check my measurements and fitness progress as well as how my eating and behavioral habits have changed.
    Having a support group : I have two friends that are losing too and I often visit these forums and just read. It assures me that it can be done and that my struggles with food are not unique.
    I have been working very hard on the psychological aspect of weight loss as well. This might not be for everyone, I guess it very much depends on how much you have to lose and why you gained in the first place. Cognitive behavioral therapy helps me replace my negative self talk, but I also have to dig deep to see why I have been eating the way I have. Once food cannot be used to soothe your feelings, it can become very painful to face the underlying issues. But I believe that this is crucial in order to be able to keep the weight off in the long run. I had lost weight before and put it back on (and more over 20 yrs ago ) and I truly believe that the reason was that I did not learn how to deal with my problems without turning to food. Especially the psychological journey if you have a lot to lose can be very painful, but it is well worth it.
  • gngracie
    gngracie Posts: 39 Member
    Great post! Logging everything helps me a lot. As soon as I stop logging, I very quickly start eating too many calories because I just don't realize how much I'm eating! Also, drinking lots of water and eating a little something (yogurt or a banana or apple, etc.) between meals so that I'm eating every 2-3 hours. This keeps me from eating too much at meal time. Regarding exercise,I have 3 or 4 different routines I do each week (some inside, some outside, some at gym), so each day I'm doing something different and I don't get bored. Also, I think one of the most important things I've learned is to forgive myself and treat myself like I would treat a friend (i.e. quit all the negative self talk and putting myself down). To me, that last one has been a biggie.
  • rduhlir
    rduhlir Posts: 3,582 Member
    Made exercise into a habit....
    Never deprived myself of anything....
    If it fit my calorie and macro goals then I ate it....
    Enjoyed ice cream and chocolate, and made sure not to see it as an enemy.....
    Learned self control....

    The above "tricks" have allowed me to:

    ...lose a total of 22 lbs over the past year.
    ...go from hating running to running a HM in 9 months.
    ...drop 2 clothing sizes.
    ...enjoy life and eat anything I want.