49, female, tried everything

245

Replies

  • GeminiBridget
    GeminiBridget Posts: 99 Member
    Also, don't get all hung up over the numbers on the scale once you commit to exercising regularly. Muscle takes up less room than fat so you could weigh a certain amount, but look as if you weigh less. I prefer using a tape measure to track my progress and only occasionally get on a scale to weigh myself. (I am in training to enter my first NPC Bikini competition so I do weight myself more now than I did before since I need to get to a certain BFP. Otherwise, I could care less about the number on the scale. I currently weight 151.4 but I can wear a size 4 clothing.)
  • Deipneus
    Deipneus Posts: 1,864 Member
    You wrote "even 1 pound a week" and that is a very reasonable goal, but don't minimize it. If you can lose a pound a week consistently, you are rockin'.

    You also wrote: "Sorry for the babbling, but that's how I feel emotionally." Getting control of our emotions is the hardest part. I think most of us know the mechanics of losing weight. If we create a calorie deficit we lose weight and if we create a surplus, we gain weight. Easy to say, hard to do.

    Be of good cheer. Lots of people, me included, failed before we succeeded. You're here, and you didn't even wait for the New Year. That is a very good sign. Good luck to you!
  • QueenBanzia
    QueenBanzia Posts: 1 Member
    So, I am not 49, but 39 and I have always been on a diet in some way or other. I've read and skimmed through all the posts before and many say the same thing. I won't, I hope, repeat it. Most of it holds true. And, likely, it's things you already know: 1) Losing weight takes time 2) Calories in vs Calories out 3) Exercise 4) Drink water, etc... It's the constitution of weight loss. LOL.

    When I was in high school, I was diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Basically, my hormones are out of whack and I have too much testosterone in me. In theory, it should actually HELP with weight loss, but it doesn't. I spent one summer in a pool swimming and GAINED weight. No, not muscle. I had swim class in the morning, spent the afternoons in the pool for fun, and had swim team in the evenings. I was a fish that summer and I ate hardly anything. My mom's always had me on diets. She was shocked that I could be fast in the pool, strong even, but be fat. The diagnosis gave us a 'thing' to blame.

    Really, what it does is make weight loss, something that's difficult under the best conditions, more difficult. And it sucks. I've tried everything. Nutrisystem (In 6 months, I lost 20 pounds while my husband dropped 60 lbs), Weight Watchers (never lost a single pound), special doctor-recommended/nutritionist-approved diets. I am diabetic. Tried diabetic only diets. Removed carbs. Removed sodas. You name it, I've done it.

    But I found something that worked for me. At least, it's the thing that got me started... This last August, I tried the Body Reset Diet by Harley Pasternak. 15 days. That's it. For the first 5 days, you drink 3 smoothies, eat 2 snacks, drink at least 8 glasses of water during the day, and get as close to 10,000 steps as you can. Days 6-10, you drink 2 smoothies, eat 2 snacks, eat 1 meal, drink 8 glasses of water, walk 10,000 steps (or as close to it as you can), and add in these exercises to work your anterior (backside) muscles. The exercises take 2 minutes, maybe 3. Also, you do them on days 6, 8, and 10. I also never hit 10,000 steps. Then, Days 11-15, you drink 1 smoothie, eat 2 snacks, eat 2 meals, 8 glasses of water, walk 10,000 steps, the anterior exercises on days 11, 13, and 15. Plus, you add exercises for the front muscles on days 12 and 14. My husband lost 10 pounds on this, I lost 9. It was a GREAT jump start. There was also no calorie counting. Just focuses on eating the -right- foods.

    After that, we just kept up with the meals, reading labels, making better choices.

    But, like you, I still have these horrible plateaus. Right now, I've lost 20 pounds in 4 months (including the initial 9), and I am training to run a 5K. I walk every day, train every other day. I'm slimming down visibly, but not by weight. The scale is my enemy and refuses to show me progress. But, I am diabetic, and I am looking at my bloodsugars. They're SOOO much better.

    That is my motivation. What you need to get is some motivation. Something that goes BEYOND the scale and calories. For me, the walking started as a way to get time to myself. Now, it's time to myself and I really want my sister to run with me in a 5K. I'm still fat. But I am doing it.

    I'd be happy to be your friend, too. I've been on MFP for only a few days. I'm a great cheerleader and, often, I need one too. Family is great, but sometimes I just roll my eyes at them. Y'know?
  • Oh my gosh! I have been on this website for a few months but have never posted nor reached out to anyone. I've not done so because I thought no one else would understand where I am at...And then I saw your post. Not babbling bw, I'm very grateful that you have said all you did!
  • Sarauk2sf
    Sarauk2sf Posts: 28,079 Member
    You are eating too much.

    Someone will always say this, and it is often a man :) Whatever the question, the answer is "eat less". Obviously, if you are not losing weight, there is a calories in/calories out problem. But the answer isn't simply to eat less.

    When you hit (peri-)menopause, your metabolism slows down. Some studies ascribe this to the loss of lean body mass (LBM). The NIH says, "Menopause is associated with a gain in fat mass and a loss of lean body mass." I have seen suggestions that women who start menopause may lose LBM at double the rate they did before (haven't seen this proven).

    So you can follow Mr Knight's advice and simply eat less, and eat even less next year as you lose more LBM, and eat still less the following year, until you eat like a bird. Or you can do something to reduce the loss of LBM, so you can eat more normally. Hence the advice from women who have been there - try strength training.

    Umm...how would you lose weight then?

    I am 46 years old...and a women. To lose weight, you need to create a deficit. You should resistance train also, but if you are not losing weight over the long term, you will either need to eat less, move more, or do both.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,270 Member
    OP: I understand what you're experiencing. Feel free to add me. And PM me if you'd like links to a few groups of women that understand what you're experiencing and what you're trying to accomplish. Best of luck!
  • enidite
    enidite Posts: 93 Member
    I am the same age as you, 49, have struggled with my weight all my life as well, ballooning up to 275 pounds. Not too good for a 5'4" frame. I felt like a I had tried everything , it worked for a while , and then I fell off the wagon and put more weight on.
    In desperation, I switched physicians and finally found one that was able to help me. It turned out that I had been given the wrong/and no medications for some medical conditions I have, Besides all this, I had a thyroidectomy about one and a half year ago, so my thyroid is completely gone. Interestingly the thyroid was removed because it was extremely overactive which was hard for me to believe because I had such weight problems; but looking at the TSH levels and the huge goiter, I knew that this was correct. It took over a year to get the thyroid hormones to the correct levels.
    Once the medications had been selected correctly, the weight started coming off. The new antidepressant that actually regulated both neurotransmitters, the correct ADD med and some meds to get my weight loss started , and I could finally get a grip on my weight problem.
    I am telling you this story to let you know that not all is black and white, it is not always "oh you eat too much" or " a calorie is a calorie: just log and exercise." Especialy from guys who do not face some of these hormonal issues and really have not walked in our shoes. (Sorry guys.) I am not trying to use this as an exuse for being overweight but I certainly think it can make it much harder to lose weight than for people who are younger or men. Yes, it is important to log and exercise honestly, but it is also equally important to realize that every body is a little different. And perimenopause is definitely not easy. The metabolism does slow down, and your best bet is to build muscle to keep your body from losing too much muscle and increase your BMR. But I think a trip to the dr. may help you too just to make sure that everything is ok and maybe even a trip to a nutritionist may be beneficial.
    Don't give up. It is a long process of falling and getting up. But don't see your falls as failures, try to see them as feedback. You are learning about what your body needs and that takes time. I guarantee you that many here have had these stumbling blocks along the way and if you just keep getting up and trying again you will make progress . It may be first two steps forward one step back, but eventually as you learn more, you will gain momentum and move faster.
    Also, remember that the scale doesn't tell everything, The number on it makes you neither a good or bad person. It is just a number that relates to gravity, Look at other factors as well, take pictures and measurements, pay attention how your clothes fit. In the beginning ( my first 50 pounds) I didn't see or feel much of a difference, but now as I near nearly 60 lbs ( I had lost some weight before joining WW and returning to MFP) all the sudden, I can see the difference. I still have a long way to go but I now know that it can be done. Attack the weight problem, with every trick and tool that you have available, visit the forums as much as you can and read success stories when you feel you can't do this. Get support, set your environment up to where you have healthy food available and where you have a convenient way to exercise, and you will succeed. You will be amazed what you all learn to make this all happen. The struggle is well worth it and you will reap some very unexpected rewards along the way.
    Feel free to send me a friend request. I would love to have more friends .
  • trulyjoyouswoman
    trulyjoyouswoman Posts: 36 Member
    If one is working out and eating healthy, the changes occur on the inside before one ever sees them on the outside. Like the excess fat we carry on the outside, we have it on the inside, and our bodies start losing it where we gained it last and on the inside, clearing up the fat and building muscles on the inside, and muscle weighs more than fat so there may be a gain of muscle at the same time one is losing fat. Try taking your measurements and re-take measurements at a weekly or monthly pattern, and muscles take up less space. The loss in measurements would be motivating and you could balance that with the loss or gain of the weight scale.

    Have you seen beef or pork with the fat running through the meat? That is similar to how the fat runs through our muscles. So when your scale says the same thing, it might simply be muscle replacing that fat.
  • Pmscur
    Pmscur Posts: 19 Member
    I too am feeling like I am spinning my wheels. I like the weight training advice, it may just be the bump we need:)
    Mixing it up helps with boredom too.
  • You are eating too much.

    Step one, start logging everything - literally everything that passes your lips. Don't worry about goals or counting, just log until you are solidly in the habit of logging.

    ^^what he said. Look at the tickers of those who are successful. There is a lot of useful information from those who have actually succeeded. Log everything. Buy a food scale. I wish someone had stressed the importance of this when I first started. It can be done. Best of luck to you!!
  • kdeaux1959
    kdeaux1959 Posts: 2,675 Member
    You are eating too much.

    Step one, start logging everything - literally everything that passes your lips. Don't worry about goals or counting, just log until you are solidly in the habit of logging.

    This. Even if you think you are logging accurately and staying under your calorie goal chances are you aren't being accurate. If you can weigh it please weigh it. A tablespoon of peanut butter can be almost one and a half in a measuring spoon, so it should be weighed.

    If you are 100% accurate and still not losing you either need to lower calories or start strength training.

    Probably some of this BUT please bear in mind that Peri-menopausal women tend to retain weight and gain probably about 15 lbs during this time of their life pretty much without regard to what they do. It is simply a biological phenomenon. Can they overcome it? Probably to some extent (I am sure there will be women with testimonials as to how they lost weight during this time and I encourage them to respond... their input will help many women in this age group who are fighting biology).... I agree that in general it is calories in and calories out... however, there really are other factors out there that we cannot legitimately ignore.
  • HollisGrant
    HollisGrant Posts: 2,049 Member
    I'm age 59 and have lost over 50 pounds this past year (43 on MFP). Yes, it is harder to lose when you get older, but don't allow yourself to fall into that mindset. People can lose weight at any age.

    I tell myself I can choose to be positive. New food and exercise add quality to my life.

    Choose an exercise you enjoy and that doesn't hurt your body, otherwise you aren't likely to stick with it. It could be anything. You might enjoy swimming.

    99 percent of my exercise is walking -- mostly at a regular pace. I love walking outside, which is why I chose it. I live in a historic area with good sidewalks, so I decided to leave my car at home and walk 1/2 mile to work. I also walk to stores and local errands and hike on the weekend in the nearby national park. If I suddenly want something from the grocery store (a 15 minute walk away), I walk to get it instead of jumping in the car. The hardest thing about this is mental. We live in a car culture and most people don't walk for daily errands. If this type of thing doesn't work for you, maybe you could walk on a treadmill. Walking is low impact and easy on the body. But choose something you really like.
  • HollisGrant
    HollisGrant Posts: 2,049 Member
    If one is working out and eating healthy, the changes occur on the inside before one ever sees them on the outside. Like the excess fat we carry on the outside, we have it on the inside, and our bodies start losing it where we gained it last and on the inside, clearing up the fat and building muscles on the inside, and muscle weighs more than fat so there may be a gain of muscle at the same time one is losing fat. Try taking your measurements and re-take measurements at a weekly or monthly pattern, and muscles take up less space. The loss in measurements would be motivating and you could balance that with the loss or gain of the weight scale.

    Have you seen beef or pork with the fat running through the meat? That is similar to how the fat runs through our muscles. So when your scale says the same thing, it might simply be muscle replacing that fat.

    Good points. Just want to add that I believe muscle doesn't replace fat. We lose the fat from inside our fat cells. We have to grow muscle. It's a different process.
  • KaiserNiner
    KaiserNiner Posts: 19 Member
    Exercising in a social way (enjoying the company of other people, shooting the breeze, while doing it) will make a massive difference - as opposed to punishing oneself with regimes. You can make it a regular part of life. eg walking, running, cycling with other people, lunch-time walks with co-workers... If it's something you look forward to doing on the weekend, it will happen.
  • mamadon
    mamadon Posts: 1,421 Member
    Hello! Feel free to send me a friend request if you like. Using this site is the first thing to work for me in twenty years. I am 51. Some people may come off as blunt on here, but their right. You need to eat at a calorie deficit. Figure out how much you should be eating and track your calories. If you want to exercsie too, thats great for your health, and allowsyou to eat more, but weight loss happens in the kitchen, healthy toned bodies in the gym.
  • helena_jj
    helena_jj Posts: 200 Member
    Have you checked your thyroid? If you are basically healthy and no issues prevent you from losing weight, I can recommend a diet or the healthy way of eating with some restrictions for fat and carbs. It has always helped me to lose 2 lbs a week and everybody of my real friends who really tried it lost no less that 1 lbs per week. It's in my blog if you want to look at it.
  • Ejourneys
    Ejourneys Posts: 1,603 Member
    I'm 55, post-menopausal, and recently reached my goal of 51 pounds down after working at it for 15 months.
    Yes, losing weight takes longer at our age, but it is possible. My method in a nutshell:

    1. I made it easy on myself. I set my goal at a half-pound loss per week (my average weekly loss was about three-quarters of a pound). I found food substitutions I enjoyed and that are sustainable. The same goes for exercise.

    2. Patience and consistency are key. My longest plateau lasted for 48 days, with scale fluctuations up-down-up-down-up-down. I felt impatient at times but never discouraged. I knew I was doing the right things and I knew I was in better shape than when I started. I set no deadlines, but instead said I'll get there when I get there.

    3. I logged everything and measured to the best of my ability.

    For more details on method, I posted this:
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/1095703-mfp-1-year-anniversary
    Here's a follow-up:
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/1153938-next-stop-maintenance
  • ElizabethFuller
    ElizabethFuller Posts: 352 Member
    Hi there! Don't be discouraged, you can do this!
    I am 58, post-menopausal and have hypothyroidism. I have spent about twelve years losing 10lb and putting on twelve. I was convinced that a combination of age and hypothyroidism made it impossible for me to lose weight. :sad:
    Then I joined this site, I saw how so many people had lost HUGE amounts of weight and I decided that I would take everyone's advice. Don't set your weight loss goals too high, try 1/2 or 1lb a week, this is a long term process.
    1. Weigh your solid food with a scale that weighs in grams. You'll get some surprises in portion size if you're used to using spoons and cups!
    2. Log everything, really everything. Stay inside your calorie limits.
    3 Add some exercise into every day. Leave the car at home or park further away, take a walk at lunchtime, use the stairs. Wear a pedometer and set yourself challenges. Exercise was the magic bullet for me, I joined a gym and did light cardio, ate back half the calories, didn't feel as though I was "on a diet" and still lost a pound a week. I then did the C25K programme and found that I like running - who'd have known??
    You can do this, it's not easy but it can be done! (But I'd probably start after the holidays!)
    Good luck.
  • Roaringgael
    Roaringgael Posts: 339 Member
    I'm 54. Menopausal and MOTIVATED. Motivation is everything.
    My L knee reminds me everyday to be motivated.
    I weigh and log every thing. Cause I just don't know how much I need or how much something weighs unless I weigh it.

    I can't exercise too much because of my knee but I am losing.

    Weigh and log everything. It works.