Noob ? (serious)

Options
lisalsd1
lisalsd1 Posts: 1,520 Member
For how long are you considered a noob? I just started Week 37 of strength-training. I think I might be a "newb" not a "noob" (I urban dictionary-ed it).

And what is the next phase after noob or newb?

Replies

  • wannaBrunnner81
    wannaBrunnner81 Posts: 107 Member
    Options
    maybe Nauv?
  • kill3rtofu
    kill3rtofu Posts: 169 Member
    Options
    you might be intermediate now? 37 weeks is pretty serious! Noob status revoked
  • lisalsd1
    lisalsd1 Posts: 1,520 Member
    Options
    you might be intermediate now? 37 weeks is pretty serious! Noob status revoked

    Cool! I will take my intermediate card now, thank you.
  • archaichoney
    archaichoney Posts: 132 Member
    Options
    I've heard from old school lifters that you're considered a novice if you have been only lifting seriously for under a year.
  • jos05
    jos05 Posts: 263 Member
    Options
    I've heard from old school lifters that you're considered a novice if you have been only lifting seriously for under a year.

    I think I am ready to move from novice... to the next step...lol!

    37 weeks is awesome!!! Keep up the good work OP! I wouldn't consider you a noob at all!!!
  • jwdieter
    jwdieter Posts: 2,582 Member
    Options
    Can lift for years and still be a beginner.
  • waldo56
    waldo56 Posts: 1,861 Member
    Options
    You're a noob if you have no idea what you are doing.

    You are a beginner until you use up "beginner gains". Its actually a really key point; in general your training approach should shift and you should reach that point before you attempt bulking.

    The signs you've hit that point:
    - Linear progression, especially in a calorie deficit, ceases to work or slows down significantly.
    - Workout to workout and set to set recovery times slow down a good bit.

    What is occurring is up to that point you are getting progressively more and more efficient at using the muscles you already have. Once you hit that point you're getting close to the maximum potential for the muscles you have; strength gains shift from being predominantly neurological to being primarily physical; if you aren't getting bigger you aren't getting stronger (and vice versa).