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Rice cooked and uncooked calories?

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  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    ok simple way of doing this is:

    Measure weight of a pan or microwave dish while empty on scales, make note of it.

    Put in desired amount of uncooked rice plus liquid.

    If you like it lovely and soft then put in a good pint of water, for those who like it more aldente then use less water.

    once you get it way you want it, drain off the liquid from the rice

    get scales again, measure pan/bowl.

    new figure minus 1st figure = weight of cooked rice.

    then go by the value of the cooked quanity on packet.

    So if say on packet it says 100cal per 75g serving cooked, and you have 350g of cooked rice.

    can do this on google spreadsheets or excell etc save using calculator.

    =sum(100/75)*350

    for calculators: 100/75 = answer then answer times by 350

    It worth getting into habit of that then if any foods in MFP database show up a value that doesnt look quite right, you wil spot it straight away.

    Simpler way of doing this:

    Put bowl on scale and hit tare. Pour in the amount of dry rice you want. Log that weight (or put it in a recipe). Boxes will have the dry weight and calories or if you just use plain rice find the USDA value (no asterisk) for the type of rice, dry.

    Add water and cook.

    If you add anything besides water when cooking (oil, butter, other ingredients) weigh and log those too.

    I usually just divvy up the rice into equal portions if making more than one serving, and divide up the total calories that way.
  • srmchansrmchan Member, Premium Posts: 206 Member Member, Premium Posts: 206 Member
    Oh wow, I get it now. Thank you. I weighed out 100g uncooked and it was around 170g cooked. How would I log it then?

    1 serving. :smile:
    If you add anything besides water when cooking (oil, butter, other ingredients) weigh and log those too.

    I usually just divvy up the rice into equal portions if making more than one serving, and divide up the total calories that way.

    @lemurcat12 is giving you good advice here.

    FWIW, I'll weigh the pot before cooking and write that down. Then I weigh it again with the cooked rice. Take the delta, divide by the number of servings I cooked and then I know how much to weigh out per serving.

    If you're lazy, like me, then you can use your phone to take a photo of the empty pot on the scale so you don't have to write it down.
    The problem there is how long it's cooked for then becomes a factor. It gets puffier and heavier because it absorbs more water the longer it cooks. Foods like this should only be measured dry.

    Agreed on dry measurement for rice, and I do see a lot of weight variances in cooked rice. Rice is a little dense-ish on the calorie side, so I always weigh it out dry and cooked. When it comes to lower calorie foods like asparagus, for instance, I don't worry about it so much.

    Sam
  • gb1lawgb1law Member Posts: 1 Member Posts: 1
    It makes mathematical sense. 100 g of raw, long-grain rice = 350 calories approx. After cooking, straining excess starch and rinsing with boiling water to make it nice and fluffy, as rice should be, allowed to sit in the strainer for a minute or two to allow any excess water to strain off, the 100 g of raw rice has become approx 270 g. 100 g of cooked rice = 130 calories, which = 1.3 calories per gramme; thus 270 g x 1.3 cal = 351 cal. Close enough for me. I'll eat easily 270 g of cooked rice per serving with a curry. The only time I would eat only 100 g of cooked rice would be when I'm having a sushi snack.
    edited October 2014
  • MargeHarperMargeHarper Member Posts: 1 Member Member Posts: 1 Member
    The reason the give a dry weight is because rice can be cooked in different ways, similar to pasta. In some recipes it is cooked for a longer time, so it absorbs more water. Therefore, if you have more water absorbed in 100gms of cooked rice/pasta, it has less calories than rice cooked for a shorter cooking time. Imagine a dry sponge and a wet sponge, it's still the same sponge but the water makes it weigh much more the wetter it is.
  • jaydee2785jaydee2785 Member Posts: 2 Member Member Posts: 2 Member
    I know this is a really really old post buuuuut....what must be taken into account when logging calories for any starch foods e.g. rice, pasta, potatoes is that if boiled/steamed the cooking process removes a huuuuge amount of the starch which has a significant calorific value that matter! You should always log the cooked values, they should be very different and are for a reason....more so with white rice!
  • jgnatcajgnatca Member Posts: 14,465 Member Member Posts: 14,465 Member
    I cook and serve rice - and oatmeal - in the same water it was prepared in, so no starch is removed by cooking.

    I do discard the starchy pasta water.
  • Michael190lbsMichael190lbs Member Posts: 1,510 Member Member Posts: 1,510 Member
    I boil a stick of Butter (800 calories) in a cup of rice every week for the extra calories so make sure you add the oil or butter calories to the rice total if you use it to cook the rice.
    edited February 2017
  • kal900kal900 Member Posts: 68 Member Member Posts: 68 Member
    right or wrong for calorie accuracy, I weigh everything as Im cutting/ prepping.. cant be trying to do it all hot. All pasta, rice, quinoa etc all dry weight... been working for me so unless i'm drastically getting it wrong, I'll carry on with dry/raw
  • denuf23denuf23 Member Posts: 2 Member Member Posts: 2 Member
    this whole concept still confuses me, no matter how many times I read it. All I want to know is how many grams of COOKED brown rice equals how many grams of carbohydrates.
  • BlueSkyShoalBlueSkyShoal Member Posts: 325 Member Member Posts: 325 Member
    So would rinsing the rice (to get rid of excess starch, which a lot of ricecooker instructions recommend) effect the caloric value?
  • ekim2016ekim2016 Member Posts: 1,199 Member Member Posts: 1,199 Member
    one cup of cooked brown rice is about 216 C
  • BocineroBocinero Member Posts: 1 Member Member Posts: 1 Member
    From Live Strong site ( not from a public comet but from an article on the subject written by the site) "Your body cannot digest raw rice, so nutritional value is given for cooked rice", so if this is correct the serving size and accompanying nutrition/calories is for cooked rice.
  • MartyZeigler1MartyZeigler1 Member Posts: 2 Member Member Posts: 2 Member
    I cook up 2 cups of rice at a time (which is 8 portions ). I use 1 cup of cooked rice per meal as my serving size. Therefore, the nutritional values for 1/4 cup uncooked times 4 will give the nutritional values per meal serving of one cup cooked rice. Correct?
  • kimny72kimny72 Member Posts: 15,954 Member Member Posts: 15,954 Member
    Bocinero wrote: »
    From Live Strong site ( not from a public comet but from an article on the subject written by the site) "Your body cannot digest raw rice, so nutritional value is given for cooked rice", so if this is correct the serving size and accompanying nutrition/calories is for cooked rice.

    Just for future reference, Live Strong articles are not a reputable source. 1/4cup of dry rice becomes @ 1 cup of cooked rice. The nutritional info assumes it will be cooked as yes if you try to swallow down dry rice, you are not going to get much if any nutritional value from it, but the serving size listed is uncooked unless the package specifically states otherwise.
  • kimny72kimny72 Member Posts: 15,954 Member Member Posts: 15,954 Member
    I cook up 2 cups of rice at a time (which is 8 portions ). I use 1 cup of cooked rice per meal as my serving size. Therefore, the nutritional values for 1/4 cup uncooked times 4 will give the nutritional values per meal serving of one cup cooked rice. Correct?

    Yes, if you measure out 2 cups of dry rice and then cook it and eat half, you are eating 4 servings.
  • cmriversidecmriverside Member Posts: 31,899 Member Member Posts: 31,899 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Bocinero wrote: »
    From Live Strong site ( not from a public comet but from an article on the subject written by the site) "Your body cannot digest raw rice, so nutritional value is given for cooked rice", so if this is correct the serving size and accompanying nutrition/calories is for cooked rice.

    Just for future reference, Live Strong articles are not a reputable source. 1/4cup of dry rice becomes @ 1 cup of cooked rice. The nutritional info assumes it will be cooked as yes if you try to swallow down dry rice, you are not going to get much if any nutritional value from it, but the serving size listed is uncooked unless the package specifically states otherwise.

    Six year old thread.

    Not your fault.

    How does this keep happening?

    source.gif


  • kimny72kimny72 Member Posts: 15,954 Member Member Posts: 15,954 Member
    Gosh darnit :blush: At least I hit the resurrection post too!
  • wilson10102018wilson10102018 Member Posts: 1,168 Member Member Posts: 1,168 Member
    I wasn't here 6 years ago so the new posts helped me.
  • TeaBeaTeaBea Member Posts: 14,512 Member Member Posts: 14,512 Member
    I only cook my rice in water and when I am trying to log it on MyFitnessPal I search for "cooked brown rice" or brown rice cooked that way I know that when it says a half a cup its a half a cup cooked brown rice.

    The problem there is how long it's cooked for then becomes a factor. It gets puffier and heavier because it absorbs more water the longer it cooks. Foods like this should only be measured dry.

    This ^

    Pasta is the same way. Some people like firmer rice (less water has been absorbed).
  • ouryveouryve Member Posts: 572 Member Member Posts: 572 Member
    1shauna1 wrote: »
    Good advice. I don't know why they include the calories for uncooked; not as if you'd ever eat it that way!

    Unless you're cooking for one.
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