Nutritionist or Trainer?

2

Replies

  • VeryKatie
    VeryKatie Posts: 5,878 Member
    You could do one and then the other. That way the costs aren't simultaneous.
  • I_Will_End_You
    I_Will_End_You Posts: 4,397 Member
    Trainer. You don't need to pay someone to tell you to eat less than you burn.
  • Trainer. You don't need to pay someone to tell you to eat less than you burn.

    I obviously know to eat less, but its what to eat, how often, how to cook it, and the things that I think are healthy probably aren't the best. I could eat just a cheeseburger a day and be "eating less" but not healthy... there's so many fad foods and things that supposedly are healthy but have so many things in them that are bad for you...I just dont know what those things are or what to look for.

  • redversustheblue
    redversustheblue Posts: 1,216 Member
    For me, definitely a trainer. I've learned a ton of great eating tips from here, but I have very bad gym anxiety and I just cannot get myself to do anything more than walking or using the elliptical if I go to the gym myself. I worked with a trainer and my roommate a few years ago, and I was motivated and worked hard in the gym, but alone I simply can't do it. I know if I had a trainer it would help my anxiety a ton.
  • libbydoodle11
    libbydoodle11 Posts: 1,351 Member
    Why not start with a trainer now so you can get familiar with the gym. Then if money is an issue you can save a bit and in a couple of months go with the nutritionist. Or visa versa...
  • pscarolina
    pscarolina Posts: 133 Member
    edited November 2014
    lilawolf wrote: »
    What do you struggle with? Do you flounder in the kitchen or in the gym? I spent my money on krav maga (martial arts) classes because I know how to cook/eat in a healthy way that I enjoy, I have figured out my form for lifting, but I would have a very hard time motivating myself for a high intensity workout. The self defense and comradery is the cherry on top.

    Id say both probably. I grew up in the south and learned to cook southern style using lots of butter and sugar, etc. I know what things I SHOULD be eating, but I was never introduced to them and would say I'm pretty picky and don't really like them. I have no idea how to cook healthy and make it taste good...and lets face it, if it doesn't taste good I wont eat it. I dont even know if that's something a nutritionist can help with.

    In the gym, I'm very intimidated. I don't know what to do, I'm embarrassed to walk in front of everyone to get to the weights which is what I really want to do. Most people there are in incredible shape and I feel judged there. In the classes that the gym offers, I feel completely behind because I'm starting in the middle of what looks like everyones 10 thousandth time being there. I end up hiding in the raquetball court and doing that for a little bit and then leaving.

    AHH!

    I'd say a trainer for a limited amount of time & focus on just their training. You have to do something sustainable for you & their advice can be as "out there" as the craziest stuff you see on here. (not eating carbs, not eating after a certain time of day, blahblah)

    I am from the south too & you don't have to give up your favorite foods, just find a new way to cook them. I eat chicken, cabbage, sweet potatoes, etc all the time. I had chicken & dumplings today. You just have to learn to fix them without adding too much fat & watch portion sizes. Cooking at home will be your best bet to control what's in your food. Google healthy southern food & I'm sure you will come up with a few items. Once you grow accustomed to cooking you will be able to modify your favorites to fit your new lifestyle.

    ETA: I suggested trainer today & dietician on the thread you started earlier 'cause you say you know what you should be eating. Why pay someone to tell you what you should be eating if you already know?
  • erickirb
    erickirb Posts: 12,277 Member
    edited November 2014
    I would suggest a dietitian, not a nutritionist, almost anyone can call themselves a nutritionist, much more required to become a registered dietitian.

    All of that said, I would only go that route if you have a medical condition as you can just use MFP to hit your calorie and macro goals, and that is all you need to lose weight. A trainer may be helpful if you are unsure of how to perform certain exercises. If it is for a routine I would just suggest following a tried tested and true beginner program such as starting strength, stronglifts, strong curves, new rules of lifting, etc and get a trainer if you need to learn proper form.
  • lilawolf
    lilawolf Posts: 1,690 Member
    lilawolf wrote: »
    What do you struggle with? Do you flounder in the kitchen or in the gym? I spent my money on krav maga (martial arts) classes because I know how to cook/eat in a healthy way that I enjoy, I have figured out my form for lifting, but I would have a very hard time motivating myself for a high intensity workout. The self defense and comradery is the cherry on top.

    Id say both probably. I grew up in the south and learned to cook southern style using lots of butter and sugar, etc. I know what things I SHOULD be eating, but I was never introduced to them and would say I'm pretty picky and don't really like them. I have no idea how to cook healthy and make it taste good...and lets face it, if it doesn't taste good I wont eat it. I dont even know if that's something a nutritionist can help with.

    In the gym, I'm very intimidated. I don't know what to do, I'm embarrassed to walk in front of everyone to get to the weights which is what I really want to do. Most people there are in incredible shape and I feel judged there. In the classes that the gym offers, I feel completely behind because I'm starting in the middle of what looks like everyones 10 thousandth time being there. I end up hiding in the raquetball court and doing that for a little bit and then leaving.

    AHH!

    So many points here. Where to start.... I'll start with: you want to do weights. WOOT! Ok, I suggest that you look into StrongLifts5x5. There are other great programs, but with this one, you only need to learn how to do 5 lifts properly, and its one of (if not THE) best beginner weight training programs. The program and the app are both free. Look at Ripptoe's form videos on YouTube. Find a personal trainer who is willing to do one or two sessions with you and show you those lifts and those lifts only. Some trainers will not show a woman freeweights and try to talk them into bosu balls and Jillian Michaels DVDs. Make sure that they know what they are talking about. Hopefully this help with your confidence.

    As for confidence: No one is specifically watching you in the gym. And even if someone was, who cares? You're young and cute and about to become a badass. Let 'em watch.

    Ok, food next. Set your goals here: http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/1080242/a-guide-to-get-you-started-on-your-path-to-sexypants
    Now, do you have problems meeting your macro or calorie goals with the food you eat? Are you satisfied? If so, don't worry about some things being labeled "healthy" or "unhealthy". 35-40% of my calories have come from fat for years and my blood work is amazing. I also aim for at least 110g of protein a day which is aprox 1g/lb of LBM (lean body mass). Less fat or less protein makes me less satisfied and unable to meet a reasonable calorie goal when I'm cutting. YMMV.

    If you are close, but not quite there, then look up easy substitutions and take baby steps. Try a new vegetable every week. Look at ways to cook them that you enjoy. For example steamed broccoli is gross IMO, but charred with a bit of chipotle dry seasoning and YUM! Try adding an extra piece of fruit to your cart at the grocery store, add a post workout protein shake, look at recipes on this site and try what looks good etc.

    If you have absolutely no idea where to start and/or your cals/macros are WAY off, then consider a nutritionist. I've never been to one, but I would expect that it would be difficult for them to give you a book of recipes that have exactly the things that you like but better. They'll have ideas for substitutions and recipes, but it won't be simple or easy.

    Well, that was longer than I expected. Good luck!
  • lishie_rebooted
    lishie_rebooted Posts: 2,993 Member
    What was wrong with the responses in the thread you started yesterday?
    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10020725/nutritionist-or-trainer
  • segacs
    segacs Posts: 4,599 Member
    erickirb wrote: »
    I would suggest a dietitian, not a nutritionist, almost anyone can call themselves a nutritionist, much more required to become a registered dietitian.

    That's not true everywhere -- rules vary by jurisdiction -- but it's true in enough places that it's good advice!

    One thing about people calling themselves "nutritionists" is that there are a LOT of quacks out there. Sure, there are good ones, too. But it's so hard to know which kind you're working with. I've heard so many stories of people coming in here and talking about crazy diets with zero scientific evidence, and claiming that a "nutritionist" told them to eat that way. Just about every form of pseudoscience or fad diet or woo also manages to find a home under the "nutritionist" umbrella.

    I'd say skip the nutritionist money and take a cooking class instead, if you want to learn new recipes that are healthy and tasty.

    As for a trainer, again, it depends what kind. If you want to learn proper form or how to use certain equipment, it could be a good idea at first. Some people do well with an ongoing trainer to keep them motivated, but IMHO true motivation comes from within. And many personal trainers earn a boatload of money just to shout stuff in your ear that you could be telling yourself.
  • ntw25
    ntw25 Posts: 149 Member
    I think that I agree with most on here. A certified Trainer that makes you comfortable in the gym will pay dividends in the future.

    I feel that the nutrition side, while simply put "eat less than you burn" may take a number of different specialities to solve.

    Have you looked in to a Healthy Eating course, maybe at a local community college or night school. If you know you need to eat healthy, but dont know what to cook or how to prepare this might be a better option.

    If it is eating "habits" a nutritionalist is not really going to help, you may need to go down the Psychology route.

    If you need a plan to follow rigidly then a dietician recommended by your doctor

    As with all professions look for certifictaions and recommendations, lots of quacks out there that give the good ones a bad name.
  • 603reader wrote: »
    What was wrong with the responses in the thread you started yesterday?
    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10020725/nutritionist-or-trainer

    Nothing was wrong with it...I realized after I posted it that I put it in the "Introduce yourself" section and I didnt mean to...I meant to put it here because I thought it would get more response here..and I was right.
  • lilawolf wrote: »
    lilawolf wrote: »
    What do you struggle with? Do you flounder in the kitchen or in the gym? I spent my money on krav maga (martial arts) classes because I know how to cook/eat in a healthy way that I enjoy, I have figured out my form for lifting, but I would have a very hard time motivating myself for a high intensity workout. The self defense and comradery is the cherry on top.

    Id say both probably. I grew up in the south and learned to cook southern style using lots of butter and sugar, etc. I know what things I SHOULD be eating, but I was never introduced to them and would say I'm pretty picky and don't really like them. I have no idea how to cook healthy and make it taste good...and lets face it, if it doesn't taste good I wont eat it. I dont even know if that's something a nutritionist can help with.

    In the gym, I'm very intimidated. I don't know what to do, I'm embarrassed to walk in front of everyone to get to the weights which is what I really want to do. Most people there are in incredible shape and I feel judged there. In the classes that the gym offers, I feel completely behind because I'm starting in the middle of what looks like everyones 10 thousandth time being there. I end up hiding in the raquetball court and doing that for a little bit and then leaving.

    AHH!

    So many points here. Where to start.... I'll start with: you want to do weights. WOOT! Ok, I suggest that you look into StrongLifts5x5. There are other great programs, but with this one, you only need to learn how to do 5 lifts properly, and its one of (if not THE) best beginner weight training programs. The program and the app are both free. Look at Ripptoe's form videos on YouTube. Find a personal trainer who is willing to do one or two sessions with you and show you those lifts and those lifts only. Some trainers will not show a woman freeweights and try to talk them into bosu balls and Jillian Michaels DVDs. Make sure that they know what they are talking about. Hopefully this help with your confidence.

    As for confidence: No one is specifically watching you in the gym. And even if someone was, who cares? You're young and cute and about to become a badass. Let 'em watch.

    Ok, food next. Set your goals here: http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/1080242/a-guide-to-get-you-started-on-your-path-to-sexypants
    Now, do you have problems meeting your macro or calorie goals with the food you eat? Are you satisfied? If so, don't worry about some things being labeled "healthy" or "unhealthy". 35-40% of my calories have come from fat for years and my blood work is amazing. I also aim for at least 110g of protein a day which is aprox 1g/lb of LBM (lean body mass). Less fat or less protein makes me less satisfied and unable to meet a reasonable calorie goal when I'm cutting. YMMV.

    If you are close, but not quite there, then look up easy substitutions and take baby steps. Try a new vegetable every week. Look at ways to cook them that you enjoy. For example steamed broccoli is gross IMO, but charred with a bit of chipotle dry seasoning and YUM! Try adding an extra piece of fruit to your cart at the grocery store, add a post workout protein shake, look at recipes on this site and try what looks good etc.

    If you have absolutely no idea where to start and/or your cals/macros are WAY off, then consider a nutritionist. I've never been to one, but I would expect that it would be difficult for them to give you a book of recipes that have exactly the things that you like but better. They'll have ideas for substitutions and recipes, but it won't be simple or easy.



    Well, that was longer than I expected. Good luck!

    I dont even know what Macros are! lol I usually can keep my calorie intake at goal, but then everything else is out of wack..like the sodium or the fats...I can't seem to get it all under goal.
    Thanks for the advice..really appreciate it!

  • Laura732
    Laura732 Posts: 244 Member
    Registered Dietitian over a Nutritionist! (Nutritionists are educated approx 18 mos - 2 years while Reg. Dietitian's spend 4 years studying food). I wouldn't go without a trainer either since I have no clue what I would do in a gym type setting.
  • zyxst
    zyxst Posts: 9,131 Member
    Neither. I have enough people in my life picking at what/how I eat and workout for free.
  • Snow3y
    Snow3y Posts: 1,412 Member
    Neither, both are vultures. If it was a do or die scenario, probably a nutritionist.. IF they were really qualified.. (not this 1 year certificate crap)
  • rml_16
    rml_16 Posts: 16,414 Member
    If you were able to hire someone to help you through your process, would it be more important to you to have a nutritionist or a personal trainer for the gym?
    I know enough about nutrition that I don't need guidance there, really. But I had a PT for a few months (met only twice a month) and it was awesome. Of course, it has to be someone who actually knows what he or she is doing and talking about ...
  • Nutritionist, not everyone is the same so the diet best for you would probably be easiest found by a nutritionist. Personal training would be good to learn lifts properly which will pay dividends in the future, but abs are made in the kitchen.
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,373 Member
    I've seen both in my life and neither of them really helped me. The nutritionist asked me to follow his restrictive plan, which really didn't work long term, and the personal trainer was telling me to use machines, so... yeah, better save the money.
  • rml_16
    rml_16 Posts: 16,414 Member
    Francl27 wrote: »
    I've seen both in my life and neither of them really helped me. The nutritionist asked me to follow his restrictive plan, which really didn't work long term, and the personal trainer was telling me to use machines, so... yeah, better save the money.
    Or find people competent in their chosen professions.