So... skipping leg day...

VeryKatie
VeryKatie Posts: 5,924 Member
edited December 2014 in Fitness and Exercise
I was just pondering...

As a woman, I've always wanted awesome legs and glutes. So every time I think about lifting heavy, that's my goal.

I don't particularly mind not having more muscular arms, back or shoulders (though I do see some benefit in order to make a more hourglass shape more apparent).

So my curious question is this: Do people feel the same way about women skipping arm/back day (lol or whatever you might call it) as they do about men skipping leg day? Or is it not generally viewed with the same opinion? I don't necessarily mean from a weightlifter's perspective per se, more from a balanced/aesthetic perspective, if that makes sense.

In other words, if I focus a lot more on legs than arms, will I look weird down the line!? Haha.
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Replies

  • zipa78
    zipa78 Posts: 354 Member
    Well, I don't think that it makes any sense what so ever to make your workout uneven on purpose. This is not a particularly good look on anyone... :-)

    dany7aze.jpg
  • PRMinx
    PRMinx Posts: 4,585 Member
    Well, I don't know if it would be as pronounced, but you would have toned legs and not toned arms and that would be weird. You would also limit the variety of exercises you could do if you were avoiding arms completely. There's a lot of lifting that works a combination of upper and lower body...

    Honestly, I would just do it all. Why not, right?
  • lishie_rebooted
    lishie_rebooted Posts: 2,993 Member
    Doesn't Bret Contreas (idk how to spell it) have just a lower body workout in his Strong Curves book? And then also a full body?

    I own the book but I only skimmed it months ago when I realized how much my *kitten* would be in the air and I already had some dude watching me at the gym.
  • darrensurrey
    darrensurrey Posts: 3,942 Member
    edited December 2014
    VeryKatie wrote: »
    So my curious question is this: Do people feel the same way about women skipping arm/back day (lol or whatever you might call it) as they do about men skipping leg day? Or is it not generally viewed with the same opinion? I don't necessarily mean from a weightlifter's perspective per se, more from a balanced/aesthetic perspective, if that makes sense.

    In other words, if I focus a lot more on legs than arms, will I look weird down the line!? Haha.

    You asked for my opinion and my opinion is yes. But some people like oversized rear ends with skinny arms. I think it looks aesthetically wrong just like it looks wrong if someone has massive biceps and chicken legs.

    Personally, training legs with heavy squats to build strength and size is completely unnecessary and detrimental to my gymnastics and climbing goals as making my legs heavier will make it harder to perform certain moves!
  • SueInAz
    SueInAz Posts: 6,592 Member
    edited December 2014
    That's funny. I sure as heck hope it's a photoshop effect, though. Yikes!

    I'm actually a female who skips legs day... at least for the moment because it's killing my half marathon training. :smile: I also have 14.5+ inch calves of solid muscle without lifting, I don't need them to be any bigger.

    Katie, I think it sort of depends on how you already look. Me? Muscling up my arms and shoulders a bit helps them match my muscle-bound legs better. Plus I've almost entirely gotten rid of the triceps jiggle I've had going on for the past few years. That alone has convinced me to keep working that area. I don't know how much longer I'll keep wanting to get bigger, though. I already have pretty broad shoulders and I'd like to be able to keep wearing medium-sized tops.
  • giggitygoo
    giggitygoo Posts: 1,978 Member
    This was basically me for a couple years. I only trained legs. I looked fine (subjectively) but had zero functional upper body strength and skinny twig arms. Still working really hard to balance that mistake out.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,879 Member
    I prefer full body programs...nothing to skip and ultimately you end up aesthetically proportionate.
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,262 Member
    I think it just makes more sense to keep it full body. You might like thinner or less shapely (I want to say toned but don't want to get yelled at) arms but then you will likely have jiggly arms. Plus you're not going to be able to lift and carry things as well on a daily basis. I mean, who wants to make multiple trips in and out of the house after a trip to the grocery? Isn't it more fun to load up as many bags as possible on each arm?
  • azwen
    azwen Posts: 237 Member
    I work upper and lower body. My upper body was so wimpy when I started working out with my trainer that I used 5 lb. dumbbells. I felt like I had little T. rex arms! I like getting stronger, and I enjoy the definition I'm starting to see in my arms. (Still have more fat to lose before my lower body has definition.) I love it when I can lift a heavier weight than before. :-) And I think some definition in the arms, shoulders, and back looks really pretty, too. So I work upper body, core, and lower body. (And now I use 10 lb. dumbbells.) My lower body strength has increased even faster; on the leg press machine, I started out at 45lbs. and now I do 135-150 lbs.
  • BusyRaeNOTBusty
    BusyRaeNOTBusty Posts: 7,166 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I prefer full body programs...nothing to skip and ultimately you end up aesthetically proportionate.

    This. Also a strong upper body is very functional. I can carry ALL the groceries, movie furniture and pick up and carry a 70lbs kid.
  • Sam_I_Am77
    Sam_I_Am77 Posts: 2,093 Member
    You really need to think of your muscles as one complete system or chain, everything kind of works together. Squats, for instance, are really thought of as a lower body or leg movement and of course the prime movers are in the lower body; however, many of your upper-body muscles (chiefly upper back) come into play to stabilize the squat. To be most optimal in your exercise you should include some upper body training. Now, that's not to say that you can't keep it extremely simple with one compound pressing lift and one compound pulling lift; you can even super-set them to save time.
  • chunkytfg
    chunkytfg Posts: 339 Member
    I'm a skip upper body day type of person. I run and cycle tons and swim a bit. I have pretty big legs and very little upper body strength. I can cycle 100 miles easily but can't do a single pressup.
  • tomatoey
    tomatoey Posts: 5,459 Member
    603reader wrote: »
    Doesn't Bret Contreas (idk how to spell it) have just a lower body workout in his Strong Curves book? And then also a full body?

    I own the book but I only skimmed it months ago when I realized how much my *kitten* would be in the air and I already had some dude watching me at the gym.

    I haven't bought that book, but he's got a blog post on the general idea, too.
  • msf74
    msf74 Posts: 3,498 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I prefer full body programs...nothing to skip and ultimately you end up aesthetically proportionate.

    Yep, me too.

    Also, I think people do better, from a heath point of view, when they consider the body as one complete unit rather than discrete parts
  • tomatoey wrote: »

    I haven't bought that book, but he's got a blog post on the general idea, too.

    that blog post was interesting. I haven't read anything by him before but I may check to see if I can find his book at the library. Thanks for sharing.
  • sheepotato
    sheepotato Posts: 600 Member
    tomatoey wrote: »
    I haven't bought that book, but he's got a blog post on the general idea, too.

    That blog was an interesting read, thanks for the link.
  • sengalissa
    sengalissa Posts: 253 Member
    VeryKatie wrote: »
    I was just pondering...

    As a woman, I've always wanted awesome legs and glutes. So every time I think about lifting heavy, that's my goal.

    I don't particularly mind not having more muscular arms, back or shoulders (though I do see some benefit in order to make a more hourglass shape more apparent).

    So my curious question is this: Do people feel the same way about women skipping arm/back day (lol or whatever you might call it) as they do about men skipping leg day? Or is it not generally viewed with the same opinion? I don't necessarily mean from a weightlifter's perspective per se, more from a balanced/aesthetic perspective, if that makes sense.

    In other words, if I focus a lot more on legs than arms, will I look weird down the line!? Haha.
    My only actual health concern would be if back and abs were different strengths. I got an evaluation and it is the case in my body, leading to back issues. (Front pulling more than back.)
    If your leg exercises affect back OR abs also, this might become tricky.

  • LiftAndBalance
    LiftAndBalance Posts: 960 Member
    If you train with compound moves, you'd probably find it very hard to entirely separate your upper and lower body. Think deadlifts, for example. The lower body only programme in Strong Curves mainly works like that if I remember correctly—there aren't any specific upper body exercises but you do have deadlifts and squats.
  • martyqueen52
    martyqueen52 Posts: 1,120 Member
    throw in some deadlifts
  • VeryKatie
    VeryKatie Posts: 5,924 Member
    edited December 2014
    You all have some good points (and it was fun to read!). I would stick to full body, but I did particularly notice SueInAz's comment - it probably would depend where you start. I still have some decent biceps from when I worked in construction (which I forget about since I'm used to it). Triceps and shoulders could use some (a lot of) work though haha.

    Also really good comment about making sure to balance back and abs.

    No worries, I will keep it full body. It's funny how it's easy to think "I want shmexy legs!" and kind of focus on them. But that's just lack of foresight I suppose ;)