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Is Hypothyroidism an Excuse?

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  • MaggieLoo79
    MaggieLoo79 Posts: 288 Member
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    The assumption is that it is easy to get medicated and then "voila!" problem solved. Sometimes it is that easy, but not always. You'll need to be tested periodically and your medication levels will get adjusted. Also, there is a lot of controversy about thyroid ranges - different doctors subscribe to different ranges. Many doctors will get you into a normal range and decide that is good enough, but you may still be having symptoms. For example, you may feel better lower in the range instead of higher. Then you'll need to find a different doctor that will let you adjust your medications until you find your "normal." If that makes sense? All of it can take years and be very frustrating.
  • linux40
    linux40 Posts: 127 Member
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    The assumption is that it is easy to get medicated and then "voila!" problem solved. Sometimes it is that easy, but not always. You'll need to be tested periodically and your medication levels will get adjusted. Also, there is a lot of controversy about thyroid ranges - different doctors subscribe to different ranges. Many doctors will get you into a normal range and decide that is good enough, but you may still be having symptoms. For example, you may feel better lower in the range instead of higher. Then you'll need to find a different doctor that will let you adjust your medications until you find your "normal." If that makes sense? All of it can take years and be very frustrating.

    Hear, hear. I was happy when I finally was diagnosed and I got some levaxine. Thought my "troubles" were over, but no....I didn´t respond to the medication at all, and there started years with frustration and finally, some good doctor, adviced me to try another, quite alternative, medication - and finally, I`m happy and in better shape than ever. But you`re so right, there`s hardly ever a quick-fix to this, unfortunately...Takes time to figure out the right medication and the right daily dose...


  • sukanya88
    sukanya88 Posts: 5 Member
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    Yes, I am myself a Hypothyroid patient and I take medication. I have been able to lose and maintain my weight. I did fall off the wagon last summer and put on few more pounds but I'm working out and eating clean now to lose the excess weight. All I can say is that you have to be patient and consistent. I have seen results and I am sure other with hypothyroidism can too!
  • Liftng4Lis
    Liftng4Lis Posts: 15,151 Member
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    You lost a pound a week, that's fantastic. You have already proven, with work, this can be done. Go get it!
  • NJGamerChick
    NJGamerChick Posts: 467 Member
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    I've had hypothyroidism for over 10 years. It took 3 years to diagnose me (all the symptoms but perfect numbers, go figure). I got to the point where I was gaining upwards of 30 pounds a month if I really didn't cut calories drastically. (I had some really terrible doctors who didn't understand what was going on and would refuse refilling my meds, too.)

    My advice? Log, exercise, keep trying. DON'T beat yourself up for it being slow losses. Worry about getting your meds right and at the right level first. Make sure your Vitamin D3 levels and your B12 levels are good, too, especially because being lethargic and tired all the time is the pits.

    And remember: Weight gain didn't happen overnight. Weight loss won't happen that quickly either.
  • MrGonzo05
    MrGonzo05 Posts: 1,120 Member
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    Untreated it has a minor impact on tdee, a couple hundred calories or so.
  • PeachyCarol
    PeachyCarol Posts: 8,029 Member
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    I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's disease 24 years ago. Hashi's will sometimes cause the normally even keel I've found with medication to hit a roadblock, and the pounds will pack on, but this just means that I need to have a medication adjustment. It's frustrating, but that's just life with Hashi's. It's not an excuse, and last year, I let 30 pounds pack on. I'm not letting that happen ever again.

    With medication and a good endocrinologist and paying attention to your symptoms and tracking your intake, there's no excuse for someone with hypothyroidism to not lose weight if they eat at a caloric deficit.

    In a similar vein to someone above, I'd really like my eyebrows back, though.
  • sylviedrozz
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    i have hypothyroidism too. i believe that once your thyroid is regulated it's no longer an excuse. but unregulated - for me it was like trying to swim against a tsunami
  • DawnieB1977
    DawnieB1977 Posts: 4,248 Member
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    I've got a friend with Hashimotos. It took ages for her to be diagnosed...the NHS aren't always the quickest to deal with things like that...and she kept gaining weight and feeling ill and tired. Yeah, her diet could've probably been better, but nothing that should've caused that weight gain.

    Once she was properly diagnosed and given medication, she started to feel better and started going to the gym lots. She did slimming world for a while, then just healthy eating, and she lost loads, I guess about 80lbs and she looks amazing now.

    Obviously she wouldn't have lost as much if she hadn't focused on healthy eating and exercising, she still had to put a lot of effort in, but I don't think the thyroid issues meant she had to try harder than anyone else. As far as I'm aware I don't have thyroid issues, and I don't lose any faster than she did.
  • sarieth05
    sarieth05 Posts: 313 Member
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    I also got diagnosed with hypothyroidism, got on medicine, and have had pretty much 0 problems losing weight. However, I got diagnosed a few months after I had started losing weight and had no trouble losing up to that point so maybe I'm just lucky. But I'm a pretty diligent logger to the best of my abilities. Everyone's offering you great advice! Best of luck to you.
  • RowanJ13
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    It's an annoyance, not an excuse. Once you're properly medicated and have your levels regulated, you lose just like anyone else. It's just a pain getting there sometimes.

    Hypothyroidism is, however, a totally valid excuse for being tired all the time *yawn*.
  • SaBh93
    SaBh93 Posts: 114 Member
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    Well, I've had been diagnosed at 7. I'm 21 now. I've always had to work harder to keep weight in check, and anxiety wreaks havoc on my system which leads to me gaining weight and keep it on despite exercise/diet.

    For the past 4 months, I've been miserable at my job and no amount of working out/ eating right helped. I left a week ago and I do feel better. I've lost some weight easily.

    I think it's also a stress response which triggers weight/fat retention. I wouldn't blame it solely on hypothyroidism, but on the endocrine system getting overstressed.
  • changing4life
    changing4life Posts: 193 Member
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    I'm on Levothyroxine...I just don't feel any different and I only lost 4 lbs in my first month...I guess I was just curious if, at my size, that was a "you need to change your strategy" or a "you're doing good, it's just because of your thyroid" type of a loss...

    Four pounds in a month is a pound a week. That is a reasonable amount of weight loss -- quite sustainable and progress in the right direction.

  • Marigoldie
    Marigoldie Posts: 15 Member
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    You are going to have to be ever vigilant on what you eat and work harder than most people to maintain or lose. Even on proper meds it is so easy to gain if you let your guard down!
  • annieraerosen
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    I'm on Levothyroxine...I just don't feel any different and I only lost 4 lbs in my first month...I guess I was just curious if, at my size, that was a "you need to change your strategy" or a "you're doing good, it's just because of your thyroid" type of a loss...

    My husband has hypothyroidism and had to go back to his endocrinologist several times to get his dose right and sometimes it still changes after its been steady for years at a time. Also, 1 pound a week is a very healthy rate. If it took you a year to put on 50 pounds, it isn't unreasonable that it will take a year or more to shed it all again. Deficits are harder than surpluses. You're doing great so far!
  • KatJ_NZ
    KatJ_NZ Posts: 31 Member
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    If your thyroid meds are calculated right, you won't have any more issues losing weight than 'regular' people.

    I'm completely hypothyroid, post radiation. I get my blood tested annually, or if I'm feeling a bit off (I got used to how I should feel, and notice changes). As long as my dose is right, no worries losing weight. I lost about 25kg in a year whilst taking the same medication as you.

    So you can do this! You're already on the right path :-)
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,502 Member
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    vmsolko wrote: »
    I have hypothyroidism too. I've had it for 12 years, along with Type 1 diabetes. Honestly, I am not sure how well I'd lose weight WITHOUT hypothyroidism, so I can't really blame it. Because I was diagnosed at age 18, I'd never tried to lose weight pre-hypothyroidism.

    I can say that when I was severely under-medicated, I was tired constantly. But after a week of the correct dosage, I was like a new person. So I am of the opinion that as long as you are on the right dosage and your levels are within normal limits, hypothyroidism shouldn't play a big role in your lack of weight loss. I would look more closely at other factors that could be a cause (secondary to hypothyroidism) of a slow weight loss: are you too tired and phoning in your workouts, are you needing to tweak your food and calories consumed, are you logging accurately?

    I'm the same way - Hashimoto's since I was 18 and type 1 diabetes since I was 9. I also have type 2 diabetes (since 13), and the symptoms of type 2 have started to decrease as I lose weight. So I'll lose a few lbs. and then suddenly have to eat a whole lot to treat lows. On my worst day, I ate more than 600g of carbs to treat lows... makes it hard to have a calorie deficit.

    Having said that, I agree about getting dosage figured out and looking at other factors. It sounds like the OP is losing 1 lb/wk, which is not unreasonable. I suggest cutting back calorie intake a bit more if that isn't enough.
  • noexcusesjustresults2014
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    MrM27 wrote: »
    You go get the proper medication.
    You track properly.
    You exercise to the best of your ability.

    If you don't do those things then yes you would be using Hypothyroidism as an excuse. You can lose weight even though you have that issue. But if you don't address it properly then you might as well play the victim.

    ^^^^

    Perfect answer.

    Hypothyroidism wont stop you from reaching your goals. Only excuses and a lack of willpower can do that
  • SarcasmIsMyLoveLanguage
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    MrM27 wrote: »
    You go get the proper medication.
    You track properly.
    You exercise to the best of your ability.

    If you don't do those things then yes you would be using Hypothyroidism as an excuse. You can lose weight even though you have that issue. But if you don't address it properly then you might as well play the victim.

    ^^^^

    Perfect answer.

    Hypothyroidism wont stop you from reaching your goals. Only excuses and a lack of willpower can do that
    +1
    I was already obese when diagnosed with thyroid cancer. Surgery in 2005, right lobe removed. Prescribed synthroid. Used my condition as an excuse to pack on more weight ending up with a BMI of 33

    Saw a vacation picture of myself and decided I'd had enough. Through diet and exercise, I lost 90 lbs over 18 months (my heart condition, tachycardia, also disappeared and I was able to toss those pills)

    A couple years later I became pregnant (another miracle and a story for another time) and packed on some weight. When my son was 4 I discovered MFP and from June to November of 2014 lost 55 lbs. No fad diets, no miracle pills. I just ate less and moved more.

    So yes, you can allow or to become an excuse, or you can realize it's just a hurdle, hop over it and keep on going.
  • editorgrrl
    editorgrrl Posts: 7,060 Member
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    MFP has a Hypothyroid & Hyperthyroid group: http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/group/753-hypothyroidism-and-hyperthyroidism

    I have Hashimoto's (autoimmune thyroid disease). Thyroid meds (for me, Synthroid & Cytomel) reduce the fatigue so I can be more active. But I lost weight just like everybody else—by eating fewer calories than I burn.