Shocked at how low my step count is!

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Replies

  • cheshirecatastrophe
    cheshirecatastrophe Posts: 1,395 Member
    segacs wrote: »
    I spend way toooo much time sitting down reading the MFP forums lol I blame that! :p:smiley:

    Haha no joke!

    I got a Fitbit a few weeks ago as a freebie. I started wearing it out of curiosity -- I haven't linked it to MFP or anything -- and I seem to typically get around 5000 steps on relatively sedentary days, and 7500 on typical workdays just from my commute. If I go out for a walk at lunchtime I'll usually get to 10,000 or close.

    For what it's worth -- and admittedly these numbers fluctuate all the time -- the Fitbit's calorie estimate has averaged about 10% higher than my actual observed TDEE over the same time period based on calories consumed and scale weight lost.

    Thats awesome! I work and study from home soooo that doesn't help much at all.

    Does your studying include memorization? I spent a TON of time during undergrad doing laps around my living room, talking out flashcards and making up mnemonics. Now that my work is mostly writing, I have a Bluetooth headset/microphone and voice recognition software for dictation, so I can do the same thing when I'm at home. (Less possible in my "office," which is approximately the size of a linen closet.)
  • deviboy1592
    deviboy1592 Posts: 989 Member
    Go for walks, run, jog, shopping
  • dougpconnell219
    dougpconnell219 Posts: 566 Member
    I usually have 4 to 5k by the time I leave work at 2pm. I usually finish in the 8 to 10 K range.
  • Holla4mom wrote: »
    I spend way toooo much time sitting down reading the MFP forums lol I blame that! :p:smiley:

    So true. I actually made myself a make shift "standing desk" by standing behind my sofa, putting an upside kitchen chair on the front, and putting my computer over a thick poster board (hard to explain, lol) so I can dance around, and swing side to side to get more movement/ steps in while I'm working on the computer all day.

    That is a great idea, although I can't quite picture it the way you've described it, its given me a few ideas I will try out :)
  • segacs wrote: »
    I spend way toooo much time sitting down reading the MFP forums lol I blame that! :p:smiley:

    Haha no joke!

    I got a Fitbit a few weeks ago as a freebie. I started wearing it out of curiosity -- I haven't linked it to MFP or anything -- and I seem to typically get around 5000 steps on relatively sedentary days, and 7500 on typical workdays just from my commute. If I go out for a walk at lunchtime I'll usually get to 10,000 or close.

    For what it's worth -- and admittedly these numbers fluctuate all the time -- the Fitbit's calorie estimate has averaged about 10% higher than my actual observed TDEE over the same time period based on calories consumed and scale weight lost.

    Thats awesome! I work and study from home soooo that doesn't help much at all.

    Does your studying include memorization? I spent a TON of time during undergrad doing laps around my living room, talking out flashcards and making up mnemonics. Now that my work is mostly writing, I have a Bluetooth headset/microphone and voice recognition software for dictation, so I can do the same thing when I'm at home. (Less possible in my "office," which is approximately the size of a linen closet.)

    Its mainly essay writing, but closer to the summer during exam time it will involve memorisation. Thanks :)
  • segacs wrote: »
    Best way to get more steps? Sell your car.

    If you have any possibility whatsoever of getting around other ways -- public transit, cycling, walking, heck, by horse and buggy if that's your thing, then I say do it.

    I realize that's not an option for everyone. But if you're lucky enough to be able to make it work, it's amazing how much more active you'll be.

    I dont actually have a car! Having a car in London is mighty expensive and theres public transport EVERYWHERE here. I do try to avoid taking the bus wherever I can though, saves me money and gets me to move a bit more
  • higgins8283801
    higgins8283801 Posts: 844 Member
    I'm a overachiever. I get 20k steps 4-5 days a week. By the time I take my kids to practice I have about 5 miles because I run 3-5 miles 3-4 days a week, and walk 2-3 miles on opposite days, then while my kids are out there soccer-ing, I'm walking to kill time. Two times around the complex is 1 mile. So by the time they're done I have 9 miles and between 20-23,000 steps. Lol I love my fitbit.
  • carlyp79
    carlyp79 Posts: 95 Member
    This made me laugh. My count is very low on an average day too, unless I get out and go for a walk. I have twins, 26 months old. I do keep busy as a Stay at Home Mum eg, right now they are napping so I am resting.
    But I have a tiny house! So moving from room to room to get things done is only a dozen or so steps. Many chores are done just standing on the spot, and stepping here and there.
    PLUS I walk softly, thanks to creaky floorboards so there are some steps that don't even get noticed at times (I tested it, ninja style)
    I have a Fitbit One, on my bra. It is dialed up to the 'sensitive' setting. So it's really only a rough guide for me, as I don't usually eat back my exercise calories unless I really feel I need to.
  • nxd10
    nxd10 Posts: 4,570 Member
    edited February 2015
    That was the starting point for a blog I wrote for Psych Today about why data is a good thing.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/thinking-about-kids/201006/the-science-intervention-when-trying-help-hurts-kids

    It is easy for me to only walk 1000 steps by 5:00 on Saturday. Most people only walk 3500. To walk 10,000 I have to work at it. That's why I love my pedometer.

    I have a standing desk and a Pilates ball at my sitting desk, btw. Both contribute to fitness.
  • carlyp79 wrote: »
    This made me laugh. My count is very low on an average day too, unless I get out and go for a walk. I have twins, 26 months old. I do keep busy as a Stay at Home Mum eg, right now they are napping so I am resting.
    But I have a tiny house! So moving from room to room to get things done is only a dozen or so steps. Many chores are done just standing on the spot, and stepping here and there.
    PLUS I walk softly, thanks to creaky floorboards so there are some steps that don't even get noticed at times (I tested it, ninja style)
    I have a Fitbit One, on my bra. It is dialed up to the 'sensitive' setting. So it's really only a rough guide for me, as I don't usually eat back my exercise calories unless I really feel I need to.

    My flat is super tiny too. About 15 steps from one side of the house to the other
  • Sued0nim
    Sued0nim Posts: 17,456 Member
    To put this in perspective it takes me 2500 to 4000 steps to hit sedentary ...so I would guess you are below sedentary..hope you have negative adjustments enabled
  • Liftin4food
    Liftin4food Posts: 175 Member
    edited February 2015

    Thats awesome! I work and study from home soooo that doesn't help much at all.

    I've done home based study - are you able to download mp3s of any lectures?? I used to do this to listen to them on my drive to work - but you could listen to them while out and about walking around. Just one hour long lecture would increase your step count significantly!

    ETA: Fixed quoting error
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    rabbitjb wrote: »
    To put this in perspective it takes me 2500 to 4000 steps to hit sedentary ...so I would guess you are below sedentary..hope you have negative adjustments enabled

    I thought that's why the sedentary/desk job option was included in all the bmr/tdee calculators. For the people who do no exercise.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    Do very sedentary people then have to not eat over their bmr??
  • Aviva92
    Aviva92 Posts: 2,333 Member
    This is not an understatement when I say I am going through some pretty major shock. I used my FitBit after quite a few months to see how many steps I get around the house and on a normal day, not counting exercise steps, I clock in at around 1,000 steps a day! Talk about sedentary

    why is this shocking to you? how can you not realize that you don't walk a lot?
  • segacs
    segacs Posts: 4,599 Member
    edited February 2015
    Do very sedentary people then have to not eat over their bmr??

    BMR is the number of calories you would burn basically by being in a coma.

    "Sedentary" has calories built into it over and above BMR already, since most of us are non-comatose and even the relatively sedentary among us do things like sit at a desk, type, walk around our house, go to the bathroom, etcetera. Those things burn calories. So, for example, my BMR is estimated at 1205 and my sedentary TDEE would be estimated at 1446 according to the calculator. That's a difference of 241, which is the calories I would be burning each day through my normal activity if I were sedentary. (My TDEE is higher than that because I'm not sedentary, I'm moderately active. But this is just an example.)

    Either way, if you want to lose weight, you're looking to create a deficit from your daily calories that are burned. A reasonable deficit would be, say, 15-20% below TDEE. So yes, some very sedentary people might actually have to eat under their BMR. In my above example, if I were sedentary and targeting a 20% deficit, I'd have to eat 1156 calories, which would be under my BMR of 1205.

    The preferable thing is to create the deficit by adding exercise, not by reducing calories further. I eat more than 1156 calories because I burn more calories by getting in some exercise, which increases my TDEE by a few hundred. It doesn't change my BMR, but it does change the number of calories I can eat to still lose weight.

    But for some people it's not an option, due to illness or disability for example, at which point yes, they'd have to lower their calories to compensate.

  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    Ahhh thanks segacs.
    I work from home, a normal single story house, and just potter around all day. I also walk my dog for 30 minutes every day, but she's frustratingly SLOW, there's no way I get my heart rate pumping lol I go grocery shopping every few days, and that's pretty much it for my activity level.
  • segacs
    segacs Posts: 4,599 Member
    Ahhh thanks segacs.
    I work from home, a normal single story house, and just potter around all day. I also walk my dog for 30 minutes every day, but she's frustratingly SLOW, there's no way I get my heart rate pumping lol I go grocery shopping every few days, and that's pretty much it for my activity level.

    That sounds fairly sedentary, yep. But it's still more exercise than someone in a coma would get.

    If you can add some workouts to that, it would go a long way towards helping your weight loss as well as your overall health. Can you do some workout videos from home on YouTube? Run up and down the stairs for ten minutes a day? Go for another walk without the dog just to get moving? It doesn't have to be joining a gym or running a marathon; there are tons of ways to get more movement into your life.

    But for now, yes, you should probably use the sedentary setting on MFP.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    I've been seriously contemplating jillian michaels 30 day shred....
  • segacs
    segacs Posts: 4,599 Member
    I've been seriously contemplating jillian michaels 30 day shred....

    Hey why not? Give it a try if that's your thing. FitnessBlender has a lot of good videos, too, and some of them are available for free on YouTube or their site.

    I say, find something you enjoy and do that. Some people love pumping iron in the gym -- it gives them a rush and feels empowering. Other people love the serenity of yoga, or the feeling they get on an early morning run, or the joy they get from dancing.

    Personally I love skiing and cycling, and have found kickboxing to be seriously fun lately.

    Find something you love and you'll never work a day in your life. That's as valid advice for exercise as it is for a career.