Beginner's Yoga Problems, Help, Please!

frando
frando Posts: 584 Member
I've just started trying to do a short yoga (a 20 minute DDP Yoga, takes me about 25/30 to do!) routine five times a week (Sunday-Tuesday, Thursday and Friday). I'm on the second week, yaaaay! But I've come across a couple of issues;

1) I've got a knee problem, as a result of flat feet, mainly from my right knee. I've started getting noticeable pain from there after the routine. It's not a terrible pain, I can live with it, but I'm unsure if it's something I should take the doctor.

2) When doing positions like downward facing dog, three legged dog etc., I can feel my toes rubbing on my carpet. Yesterday, whilst shaving, I realised I've kinda got something akin to carpet burn on my toes.

I'm unsure if they're both related to the fact that I'm just practising on carpet rather then a mat or if there is something I should be doing to prevent these?

Also any tips for starting yoga on a regular basis will be useful.

Thank you!

Replies

  • Ness725
    Ness725 Posts: 13 Member
    I used to do yoga using a DVD, then switched to a weekly class. Honestly, I would highly recommend taking a few intro classes with an instructor. Yoga is 100% form, and you would be amazed at how a little adjustment can make the pose totally different. I'd also recommend a good "sticky" mat to keep you from slipping.

    I know those things cost a little $$, but if you want to practice regularly, its worth the investment. Personally, I prefer the class experience for yoga (and I normally prefer to work out alone). The atmosphere is very "zen". :)
  • snowboardRN
    snowboardRN Posts: 25 Member
    I definitely recommend a mat.
    And it shouldn't be painful for you besides the normal stretch feeling... I would see what your doc has to say. You don't want to make the pain worse!
  • yoginimary
    yoginimary Posts: 6,783 Member
    Also see what a teacher has to say about the knee pain in certain poses. Some teachers will give you much better advice than others.
  • TheLittleFangs
    TheLittleFangs Posts: 205 Member
    Regarding injury - always see the Dr when starting any new regime. With an injury this is even more important :)

    Yep - get a mat :) you can also get grippy socks for yoga
  • futuremanda
    futuremanda Posts: 816 Member
    Yep get a mat.

    Also, downward dog etc can be modified. Some days, my dog is pretty short (so hands closer to feet). You may be able to modify your downward dog so that your toes aren't sliding on the carpet in the meantime.

    With proper form, you can probably avoid knee pain. So you'll want to look up videos that do in-depth descriptions of some of the poses you've been working on. That or, as others have suggested, do an in-person class for a bit. One thing I learned at an in-person class is that MY neutral knee position is *way* in. So to get the right knee position, I have to push my knees out, and it feels weird to me. But I don't get pain. (For visual reference: Say I am in runner's lunge, left leg in front. I have to hold the knee more to the left than is natural for me. Same in Warrior 2.)

    Also, practice any/all on-the-knees positions with a blanket or towel or something.
  • Joannah700
    Joannah700 Posts: 2,665 Member
    Ness725 wrote: »
    I used to do yoga using a DVD, then switched to a weekly class. Honestly, I would highly recommend taking a few intro classes with an instructor. Yoga is 100% form, and you would be amazed at how a little adjustment can make the pose totally different. I'd also recommend a good "sticky" mat to keep you from slipping.

    I know those things cost a little $$, but if you want to practice regularly, its worth the investment. Personally, I prefer the class experience for yoga (and I normally prefer to work out alone). The atmosphere is very "zen". :)

    Agree about getting some tips on form.

    Each time I go to a class, the yoga instructor might make a minor correction on the position of my wrists in downward dog or the alignment of feet in warrior II position. Plus...a good instructor will tell you which exercises you SHOULD NOT do if you're feeling pain and offer some alternatives.

    With groupon, living social or a few other online deal sites - sometimes you can get 10 classes for $30 or other fantastic bargains.

    If you are going to do it at home (maybe there aren't a lot of programs at you - or it only seems like a good idea to do yoga at 2am and there aren't any classes at that time) maybe invest in a yoga mat that helps with alignment?

    At a yoga studio I used to go to they had this one:
    Yzy4ju6W__QwDbRpGIKhTMqSWigjRZWLoWN6i_k4QU-EDvIFHUV0Ed5KhdJKDrXTYbUuhPFh-B6WYime_cGJtCLj=s487

    At $75 - I never bought it, but if I were going to only do yoga at home? I might consider it.

    If you do an online search you can find other yoga alignment mats that might be worth it to you.

    Good luck!



  • sistrsprkl
    sistrsprkl Posts: 1,013 Member
    A few thoughts:
    1. You can find cheap yoga mats at Marshalls or TJ Max. I'm also a fan of yoga towels to prevent slipping.
    2. If possible, the mat should be on a hard surface, not carpet. Better for balance.
    3. When you feel pain during yoga, stop.
    4. I don't know DDP but if you're experiencing pain, perhaps you can find easier videos online to begin with.
    5. Agree w/ pp, it's very helpful to get in-person instruction. A lot of places offer free classes or cheap trial memberships if yoga is really something you want to pursue. Also, most YMCA's offer yoga.
    6. If you think you need to see a doctor for you knee you should go, I've had great success with pt and no residual issues. Better to take care of it sooner than later.
  • allison1983weber
    allison1983weber Posts: 126 Member
    I have flat feet/over-pronation issues and my knees bothered me a lot. I went to physio for some exercises and got a good pair of shoes and insoles that support the arch.
  • mochapygmy
    mochapygmy Posts: 2,123 Member
    As someone who is new to yoga I wouldn't start with DDP or vinyasa. Look at fitnessblender or other sites for beginner yoga practices but if you can definitely try to get to a few classes like the earlier posters suggested. They are immensely helpful and a yoga mat is a necessity for yoga.
  • MysticRealm
    MysticRealm Posts: 1,264 Member
    Make sure you are always stacking your knees over you ankles, both side to side, as well as front to back (no knees in front of toes) when doing lunges, warrior poses etc. and when you have a leg straight out behind you it should be in a straight line as well. Look back and check it.