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Wine drinkers

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emmoen
emmoen Posts: 218 Member
so I want to start drinking wine every now and then... I'm not a big alcohol drinker anyway but for some reason the idea of coming home and relaxing with a glass of wine sounds good. What wine would you suggest for a beginner who doesn't really drink much

Replies

  • girlinahat
    girlinahat Posts: 2,956 Member
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    Can't go too far wrong with a Marlborough sauvignon blanc.
  • MrsBooBear
    MrsBooBear Posts: 12,618 Member
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    Chardonnay. Sweet but not sickly. :smile:
  • Bruceapple
    Bruceapple Posts: 2,026 Member
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    Malbec, heavy red
  • Nicospan
    Nicospan Posts: 1,175 Member
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    Brunello di Montalcino, best choice
  • greco16
    greco16 Posts: 465 Member
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    Lots of cheap nasty wine, by the litre..
  • pdxwine
    pdxwine Posts: 389 Member
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    If you have not been a wine drinker, before, it may be best to start with a white wine that is a bit sweeter, such as Riesling (German Rieslings are some of my favorite Rieslings as they are not as sweet, usually, as domestic). Then work your way into drier whites. Eventually, you will gravitate to trying lighter style reds, then heavier reds.

    The best thing to do, is go to a local wine shop, or store with a Wine Steward. Tell them what types of flavors you like, and they can help you select wines that will work.

    One thing to keep in mind, once opened, wine will lose its flavors in a day or two. If you are just starting with wine, you may want to seek out half bottles.

  • kinkyslinky16
    kinkyslinky16 Posts: 1,469 Member
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    pdxwine wrote: »
    If you have not been a wine drinker, before, it may be best to start with a white wine that is a bit sweeter, such as Riesling (German Rieslings are some of my favorite Rieslings as they are not as sweet, usually, as domestic). Then work your way into drier whites. Eventually, you will gravitate to trying lighter style reds, then heavier reds.

    The best thing to do, is go to a local wine shop, or store with a Wine Steward. Tell them what types of flavors you like, and they can help you select wines that will work.

    One thing to keep in mind, once opened, wine will lose its flavors in a day or two. If you are just starting with wine, you may want to seek out half bottles.

    I agree starting with a German riesling. That's what I started with way back when.
  • augold86
    augold86 Posts: 587 Member
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    I agree with @pdxwine. A riesling would be a great start. The ones I've had generally have an apple kind of taste. I also would suggest a moscato. It's a bit sweeter but the alcohol content is lower.
  • CasandraNS
    CasandraNS Posts: 1,960 Member
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    Stella rose!! Love all the flavors
  • duckykissy
    duckykissy Posts: 285 Member
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    I actually found a brand called Early Harvest here that do a low carb, low alcohol wines. Given that you're not much of a drinker anyways, they may be up your alley. I find that they're not as "heavy" as some of the regular reds and whites, but no where near as sweet as a moscato and I think something similar may help you get into wine. Without finding something similar I would suggest you ask your local wine shop to suggest a moscato that isn't too sweet. Some of them are nice, but some are sickeningly sweet so make sure to ask.
  • Kitcandoo
    Kitcandoo Posts: 93 Member
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    I also agree with the Reisling or a savignon blanc. Something light, cold and white to start. Chardonnays in my opinion are quite oaky and not a beginners choice. But beware....once you start with the wine....you can't and wont want to go back. Enjoy!
  • kamber13
    kamber13 Posts: 249 Member
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    I'm a huge fan of Melbec wines. It's an Argentinian red that's not dry or overly sweet. It's also classy enough to order at a restaurant or buy at a liquor store and you seem somewhat knowledgeable... LOL
  • fallenoaks4
    fallenoaks4 Posts: 63 Member
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    pdxwine wrote: »

    The best thing to do, is go to a local wine shop, or store with a Wine Steward. Tell them what types of flavors you like, and they can help you select wines that will work.



    This. Go to a wine tasting or a wine festival where you can try many all at once. It's much easier to find what you like when you can compare them back to back rather than just grabbing anything off the rack.
  • wizzybeth
    wizzybeth Posts: 3,578 Member
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    I like sweet red wines over dry wines.
  • SuzyQAzureblue
    SuzyQAzureblue Posts: 4,256 Member
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    Moscato
  • DaneanP
    DaneanP Posts: 433 Member
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    I agree with seeking out opportunities to taste all sorts of wine. Once you figure out what varietals you prefer, you can then explores those more in depth with regard to regions or price range or both.

    Another fun thing to do is host a wine tasting party. Invite your friends to bring a bottle of their choosing and a dish the pairs well with it, then enjoy your evening of wine and food.

    Cheers and enjoy the journey!
  • manicautumn
    manicautumn Posts: 224 Member
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    Pinot Noir for a good red :)