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thoughts on low carb diets?

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I lose weight easily, but i'm worried about health effects.
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Replies

  • JPW1990
    JPW1990 Posts: 2,424 Member
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    That's awfully vague. Exactly what health effects? Most people see an improvement in cholesterol (same as anyone else who loses weight), A1C, blood pressure, complexion, and energy, as long as it's done correctly. If you half *kitten* it, it's possible to make yourself sick, no different than incorrectly adhering to any other WOE and ignoring basic rules about nutrients and caloric minimums to prevent malnutrition.
  • SnuggleSmacks
    SnuggleSmacks Posts: 3,731 Member
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    Low carb is just another way to create a calorie deficit. It works for many people, and is too restrictive for others. But one thing to think about is when you reach your goal, what then? Do you keep eating low-carb and just increase your calories, or do you add those carbs back in? Will that make you gain all the weight back? Is it a better idea to restrict food groups for a while to lose weight, or is it a better idea to learn to deal with those foods in a healthy way and in reasonable portions so that you can continue to do that for life?
  • MoiAussi93
    MoiAussi93 Posts: 1,948 Member
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    Low carb is the best way to eat for me...and I have tried many. I see no negative health effects. Only good health effects.
  • chloeelizabethm
    chloeelizabethm Posts: 184 Member
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    I love low carb. I'm less hungry and don't feel like it's as restrictive as I expected - it definitely makes me be more imaginative with what I serve for dinner! Fibre is an issue though, illusive little thing.
  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
    edited May 2015
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    I am definitely in the pro "lower carb" camp. I'm aiming for 30 - 35% total but try not to eat any highly refined carbs... as much as possible at least. That means no plain ol' bread and very little bread at all over the course of a week. I think I had three slices this week after many weeks of zero. No bagels (and I used to live on bagels). No tortillas as a rule. I will have some whole grain multi-grain porridge once in a while. Carbs from vegetables are ok and fruits too but more veges than fruits.

    Fats I let float wherever they will go; they are usually my biggest macro. This doesn't worry me as they are generally healthy fats.

    I'm losing 2kg a week, and have been for quite some time. I'm not finding the reduced carbs gets in the way of my running (I'll run more than 200km this month). I feel satiated... full even and I don't crave carbs at all.

    So far the mix is working very well for me.
  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEld
    RuNaRoUnDaFiEld Posts: 5,864 Member
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    Low carb to one person will be high to another.
  • jellybaby84
    jellybaby84 Posts: 583 Member
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    Do you mean all carbs or just starchy ones?

    I don't eat bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, oats, wheat etc and have noticed no ill health effects at all (except that when I do break my diet and eat them I feel like death afterwards)

    But I eat loads of fruit, vegetables and coconut water so I get plenty of carbs that way.

    I couldn't do protein only I don't think
  • miche173
    miche173 Posts: 50 Member
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    I am insulin resistant and pre-diabetic, so low carb is a health necessity. That being said, I find it a pretty easy way to eat. I'm not nearly as tired (due to no blood sugar crashes), and I'm losing weight at a good pace. My blood work also looks great. You have to find a WOE that works with your body, and your particular make up. Good luck!
  • iluvstrwbrries
    iluvstrwbrries Posts: 26 Member
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    I have been low carbing for over a decade.

    Initially when you start you can expect 3-4 days of carb, sugar and caffeine withdrawal. Most people don't make it past the first day. You don't realize how addicted you are to c.s.c. until you don't eat them anymore. Look at it as a detox and you will get through it.

    Once you're through that point, you will find your energy levels will increase . I get my carbs from vegetables and some fruit. I avoid refined sugar, bread, rice, pasta etc...for now.... We CAN eat what everyone else does but we do it in moderation.

    And they key to being successful is to gradually add back the foods in a pyramid, this will re-train your body and your brain how to eat those foods... eventually we do add back in grains but a low carbers food pyramid looks different than the standard food pyramid.



    cyja69lmd0r0.jpg
    py.jpg 27.8K
  • juggernaut1974
    juggernaut1974 Posts: 6,212 Member
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    It's one of a myraid of different ways to create a calorie deficit (ie lose weight).

    For some people it's great

    For others it's not.

    There's no particular magic to it.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
    edited May 2015
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    mwyvr wrote: »
    I am definitely in the pro "lower carb" camp. I'm aiming for 30 - 35% total but try not to eat any highly refined carbs... as much as possible at least. That means no plain ol' bread and very little bread at all over the course of a week. I think I had three slices this week after many weeks of zero. No bagels (and I used to live on bagels). No tortillas as a rule. I will have some whole grain multi-grain porridge once in a while. Carbs from vegetables are ok and fruits too but more veges than fruits.

    Fats I let float wherever they will go; they are usually my biggest macro. This doesn't worry me as they are generally healthy fats.

    I'm losing 2kg a week, and have been for quite some time. I'm not finding the reduced carbs gets in the way of my running (I'll run more than 200km this month). I feel satiated... full even and I don't crave carbs at all.

    So far the mix is working very well for me.

    I'm in the camp of: limit the heavily refined carbs as well. LowER carb and SLOWER carb for me. It's been my approach to maintenance for about 14 years.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
    Options
    I have been low carbing for over a decade.

    Initially when you start you can expect 3-4 days of carb, sugar and caffeine withdrawal. Most people don't make it past the first day. You don't realize how addicted you are to c.s.c. until you don't eat them anymore. Look at it as a detox and you will get through it.

    Once you're through that point, you will find your energy levels will increase . I get my carbs from vegetables and some fruit. I avoid refined sugar, bread, rice, pasta etc...for now.... We CAN eat what everyone else does but we do it in moderation.

    And they key to being successful is to gradually add back the foods in a pyramid, this will re-train your body and your brain how to eat those foods... eventually we do add back in grains but a low carbers food pyramid looks different than the standard food pyramid.



    cyja69lmd0r0.jpg

    Whose pyramid is this?
  • PeachyCarol
    PeachyCarol Posts: 8,029 Member
    edited May 2015
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    Some people love it, some people do better with more carbs. I do well with lower carb than most, but still consider my carbs higher than most low carbers (about 100g). That said, my reason for moderating my carbs has more to do with managing my energy levels (medical conditions make them dodgy). My weight loss goals are all about a calorie deficit.

    I don't think there are any long-lasting negative health effects to limiting carbs. The only article I've seen to that effect came from a radical vegan site. Not exactly a trustworthy source for such information.

  • iluvstrwbrries
    iluvstrwbrries Posts: 26 Member
    Options
    I have been low carbing for over a decade.

    Initially when you start you can expect 3-4 days of carb, sugar and caffeine withdrawal. Most people don't make it past the first day. You don't realize how addicted you are to c.s.c. until you don't eat them anymore. Look at it as a detox and you will get through it.

    Once you're through that point, you will find your energy levels will increase . I get my carbs from vegetables and some fruit. I avoid refined sugar, bread, rice, pasta etc...for now.... We CAN eat what everyone else does but we do it in moderation.

    And they key to being successful is to gradually add back the foods in a pyramid, this will re-train your body and your brain how to eat those foods... eventually we do add back in grains but a low carbers food pyramid looks different than the standard food pyramid.



    cyja69lmd0r0.jpg

    Whose pyramid is this?

    That one belongs to the FoodNetwork lol. There are others out there they vary but for the most part are the same.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
    Options
    I have been low carbing for over a decade.

    Initially when you start you can expect 3-4 days of carb, sugar and caffeine withdrawal. Most people don't make it past the first day. You don't realize how addicted you are to c.s.c. until you don't eat them anymore. Look at it as a detox and you will get through it.

    Once you're through that point, you will find your energy levels will increase . I get my carbs from vegetables and some fruit. I avoid refined sugar, bread, rice, pasta etc...for now.... We CAN eat what everyone else does but we do it in moderation.

    And they key to being successful is to gradually add back the foods in a pyramid, this will re-train your body and your brain how to eat those foods... eventually we do add back in grains but a low carbers food pyramid looks different than the standard food pyramid.



    cyja69lmd0r0.jpg

    Whose pyramid is this?

    That one belongs to the FoodNetwork lol. There are others out there they vary but for the most part are the same.

    They vary QUITE A LOT. And I've still never seen one quite like this.

  • iluvstrwbrries
    iluvstrwbrries Posts: 26 Member
    Options
    I have been low carbing for over a decade.

    Initially when you start you can expect 3-4 days of carb, sugar and caffeine withdrawal. Most people don't make it past the first day. You don't realize how addicted you are to c.s.c. until you don't eat them anymore. Look at it as a detox and you will get through it.

    Once you're through that point, you will find your energy levels will increase . I get my carbs from vegetables and some fruit. I avoid refined sugar, bread, rice, pasta etc...for now.... We CAN eat what everyone else does but we do it in moderation.

    And they key to being successful is to gradually add back the foods in a pyramid, this will re-train your body and your brain how to eat those foods... eventually we do add back in grains but a low carbers food pyramid looks different than the standard food pyramid.



    cyja69lmd0r0.jpg

    Whose pyramid is this?

    That one belongs to the FoodNetwork lol. There are others out there they vary but for the most part are the same.

    They vary QUITE A LOT. And I've still never seen one quite like this.

    yes, it just depends on what "low carb" program people are following..it seems that there are so many different ways to do low carb.....for instance the ketogenic pyramid looks more like this....and even that will vary person to person.

    jyrkl6c8jsxw.jpg




  • iluvstrwbrries
    iluvstrwbrries Posts: 26 Member
    Options
    I follow the original pyramid I posted. It keeps me happy and full lol
  • TeaBea
    TeaBea Posts: 14,517 Member
    Options
    Low carb is just another way to create a calorie deficit. It works for many people, and is too restrictive for others. But one thing to think about is when you reach your goal, what then? Do you keep eating low-carb and just increase your calories, or do you add those carbs back in? Will that make you gain all the weight back? Is it a better idea to restrict food groups for a while to lose weight, or is it a better idea to learn to deal with those foods in a healthy way and in reasonable portions so that you can continue to do that for life?

    This^

    Low carb is quicker weight loss at the beginning....but that's basically water loss.

    I need a lifestyle change because losing the weight is just HALF the battle. Keeping the weight off for a lifetime is hard work. Pick the thing that is sustainable to you....before AND after.
  • JPW1990
    JPW1990 Posts: 2,424 Member
    Options
    I have been low carbing for over a decade.

    Initially when you start you can expect 3-4 days of carb, sugar and caffeine withdrawal. Most people don't make it past the first day. You don't realize how addicted you are to c.s.c. until you don't eat them anymore. Look at it as a detox and you will get through it.

    Once you're through that point, you will find your energy levels will increase . I get my carbs from vegetables and some fruit. I avoid refined sugar, bread, rice, pasta etc...for now.... We CAN eat what everyone else does but we do it in moderation.

    And they key to being successful is to gradually add back the foods in a pyramid, this will re-train your body and your brain how to eat those foods... eventually we do add back in grains but a low carbers food pyramid looks different than the standard food pyramid.



    cyja69lmd0r0.jpg

    Whose pyramid is this?

    That one belongs to the FoodNetwork lol. There are others out there they vary but for the most part are the same.

    They vary QUITE A LOT. And I've still never seen one quite like this.

    It shows up on /r/keto a lot, referred to as the "keto food pyramid," though I don't know the original source.
  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
    Options
    That's a reasonable looking pyramid (the original)!
    TeaBea wrote: »
    Low carb is quicker weight loss at the beginning....but that's basically water loss.

    Opinion or fact? Peer reviewed published papers please.

    There are peer reviewed published papers demonstrating how a high carb diet contributes to insulin insensitivity. Rising levels of insulin are not good for your health nor is a favourable environment for weight stability.

    High carbohydrate diets contribute to inflammation that is believed to lead to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, and has been observed to be a factor in the development of insulin resistance.

    A lower carb higher fat diet has been shown to reduce such inflammation.

    The growing body of evidence plus simple observation of North Americans suggests there is every reason to reduce intake of highly refined (some would suggest all grains refined or not) and non-vegetable carbohydrate sources.

    Some carbohydrate in our diets is essential. Most of the population in North America is getting far too much, and far too much from poor sources.