I wasn't ashamed!

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Hi everyone,

Well over the weekend I was asked what use to be 'the dreaded question' by a friend . . . . . so how much do you weight? For the first time every I wasn't ashamed!! I felt great and proudly announced that I was 11s 4lbs (159lbs). I think it even made her feel bad I weigh only slightly more than here but am way taller!

:):):):):)

Replies

  • danprin1
    danprin1 Posts: 17 Member
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    That's awesome!
  • pollypocket1021
    pollypocket1021 Posts: 533 Member
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    I find that "a hundred and plenty" generally suffices.
  • segacs
    segacs Posts: 4,599 Member
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    I find it baffling that friends will come right out and ask "how much do you weigh?" I've always seen that as extremely rude question.

    But hey, it's just a number on a scale. Nothing to be ashamed of, no matter what it says.
  • andympanda
    andympanda Posts: 763 Member
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    segacs wrote: »
    I find it baffling that friends will come right out and ask "how much do you weigh?" I've always seen that as extremely rude question.

    But hey, it's just a number on a scale. Nothing to be ashamed of, no matter what it says.

    Guess it might make a difference if you are male or female. Most guys don't care about being asked about their weight. I will never ask a women her weight since it can be a touchy subject.

  • segacs
    segacs Posts: 4,599 Member
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    andympanda wrote: »
    Guess it might make a difference if you are male or female. Most guys don't care about being asked about their weight. I will never ask a women her weight since it can be a touchy subject.

    Yeah, that might be one of those socially-constructed differences.

    But I wouldn't go around asking men, either. To me, that's akin to asking someone how much money they make. It just isn't done in polite company.
  • SergeantSausage
    SergeantSausage Posts: 1,673 Member
    edited June 2015
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    segacs wrote: »
    I find it baffling that friends will come right out and ask "how much do you weigh?" I've always seen that as extremely rude question.

    But hey, it's just a number on a scale. Nothing to be ashamed of, no matter what it says.

    It's just a fact about a physical attribute. No better or worse than "what color are your eyes?".

    The only thing that makes it "rude" are your particular hang ups and insecurities, right?

  • juggernaut1974
    juggernaut1974 Posts: 6,212 Member
    edited June 2015
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    segacs wrote: »
    andympanda wrote: »
    Guess it might make a difference if you are male or female. Most guys don't care about being asked about their weight. I will never ask a women her weight since it can be a touchy subject.

    Yeah, that might be one of those socially-constructed differences.

    But I wouldn't go around asking men, either. To me, that's akin to asking someone how much money they make. It just isn't done in polite company.

    Is that why I keep getting the cold shoulder from my standard opening line when meeting someone?

    "Hi, nice to meet you. How old are you, how much do you weigh, what's your annual income, what's your religion, and for whom did you vote for president?"
  • Sued0nim
    Sued0nim Posts: 17,456 Member
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    ceoverturf wrote: »
    segacs wrote: »
    andympanda wrote: »
    Guess it might make a difference if you are male or female. Most guys don't care about being asked about their weight. I will never ask a women her weight since it can be a touchy subject.

    Yeah, that might be one of those socially-constructed differences.

    But I wouldn't go around asking men, either. To me, that's akin to asking someone how much money they make. It just isn't done in polite company.

    Is that why I keep getting the cold shoulder from my standard opening line when meeting someone?

    "Hi, nice to meet you. How old are you, how much do you weigh, what's your annual income, what's your religion, and for whom did you vote for president?"

    Nope, it's the lack of deodorant
  • juggernaut1974
    juggernaut1974 Posts: 6,212 Member
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    rabbitjb wrote: »
    ceoverturf wrote: »
    segacs wrote: »
    andympanda wrote: »
    Guess it might make a difference if you are male or female. Most guys don't care about being asked about their weight. I will never ask a women her weight since it can be a touchy subject.

    Yeah, that might be one of those socially-constructed differences.

    But I wouldn't go around asking men, either. To me, that's akin to asking someone how much money they make. It just isn't done in polite company.

    Is that why I keep getting the cold shoulder from my standard opening line when meeting someone?

    "Hi, nice to meet you. How old are you, how much do you weigh, what's your annual income, what's your religion, and for whom did you vote for president?"

    Nope, it's the lack of deodorant

    Could be...still haven't found a Paleo approved one.
  • juliebowman4
    juliebowman4 Posts: 784 Member
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    segacs wrote: »
    I find it baffling that friends will come right out and ask "how much do you weigh?" I've always seen that as extremely rude question.

    But hey, it's just a number on a scale. Nothing to be ashamed of, no matter what it says.

    It's just a fact about a physical attribute. No better or worse than "what color are your eyes?".

    The only thing that makes it "rude" are your particular hang ups and insecurities, right?
    Exactly!
    There's a gal at work.....I'm dying to ask her what she weighs, but we've all been conditioned to believe it's a rude question.
    I want to ask her because I admire her shape/size and I think "If I look like that/same weight, then I'm skipping this diet crap and hopping over to maintenance"
    But....I'm sure she'll look at me like an insect and tell me to sod off.

  • Justthisgirl1994
    Justthisgirl1994 Posts: 226 Member
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    A couple of years ago, different guys I went out with would always ask me that. It was so weird. I was really proud of my body though, so I guess they figured it was ok. We also did tend to have working out in common and that would be our topic convos.

    In HS my friends asked that question, but we were so young (15ish) so we didn't know any better I guess.

    Now the only person that asks occasionally is my mom. That I don't mind since I tell her even when she doesn't ask haha.
  • Liftng4Lis
    Liftng4Lis Posts: 15,150 Member
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    rabbitjb wrote: »
    ceoverturf wrote: »
    segacs wrote: »
    andympanda wrote: »
    Guess it might make a difference if you are male or female. Most guys don't care about being asked about their weight. I will never ask a women her weight since it can be a touchy subject.

    Yeah, that might be one of those socially-constructed differences.

    But I wouldn't go around asking men, either. To me, that's akin to asking someone how much money they make. It just isn't done in polite company.

    Is that why I keep getting the cold shoulder from my standard opening line when meeting someone?

    "Hi, nice to meet you. How old are you, how much do you weigh, what's your annual income, what's your religion, and for whom did you vote for president?"

    Nope, it's the lack of deodorant
    Snort!
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 24,840 Member
    edited June 2015
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    segacs wrote: »
    andympanda wrote: »
    Guess it might make a difference if you are male or female. Most guys don't care about being asked about their weight. I will never ask a women her weight since it can be a touchy subject.

    Yeah, that might be one of those socially-constructed differences.

    But I wouldn't go around asking men, either. To me, that's akin to asking someone how much money they make. It just isn't done in polite company.

    I'm with you ... I'm astounded that someone would just come right out and ask a person's weight. I've lived and worked in several provinces/states in two countries, and I've travelled a lot ... and I've never come across a circumstance where that would be considered an appropriate question to ask someone.

    It is right up there with asking people how much money they make, who you voted for, etc. etc.

    Maybe I have just lived and travelled in more reserved communities.

    Even where I work now ... I've lost 32 lbs (8% of my body weight) ... but absolutely no one has said a word. Not a soul has ventured out with a "Have you lost weight?" It's just not done. Of course, I've also done things like had about 8" of my hair lopped off and changed the colour a couple times, and no one has said a word about that either. :smiley:
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,897 Member
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    Oh, I've heard "Have you lost weight?" and "How much weight have you lost?" but no one has ever come out and asked the number.
  • atypicalsmith
    atypicalsmith Posts: 2,742 Member
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    rabbitjb wrote: »
    ceoverturf wrote: »
    segacs wrote: »
    andympanda wrote: »
    Guess it might make a difference if you are male or female. Most guys don't care about being asked about their weight. I will never ask a women her weight since it can be a touchy subject.

    Yeah, that might be one of those socially-constructed differences.

    But I wouldn't go around asking men, either. To me, that's akin to asking someone how much money they make. It just isn't done in polite company.

    Is that why I keep getting the cold shoulder from my standard opening line when meeting someone?

    "Hi, nice to meet you. How old are you, how much do you weigh, what's your annual income, what's your religion, and for whom did you vote for president?"

    Nope, it's the lack of deodorant

    Don't forget to ask for their Social Security number and the date of their birth.
  • segacs
    segacs Posts: 4,599 Member
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    Don't forget to ask for their Social Security number and the date of their birth.

    And their mother's maiden name. (Which, seriously, how is this still a security question in 2015? Women where I live haven't had "maiden" names since they stopped changing them in the 80s, and besides, plenty of people come from families that don't follow the mom n' dad model.)
  • TiffanyR71
    TiffanyR71 Posts: 217 Member
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    My husband is the only non-medical professional with whom I'll discuss my weight. No one has ever asked me, either...

    I once had an in-law ask how much I make. Again, something I only discuss with my husband. I hedged the question...

    Certain things are no one's business. And if someone asks a personal question that you'd rather not answer, then don't.