I have an issue of eating peanut butter at night when I'm bored?

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Replies

  • PinkDeerBoy
    PinkDeerBoy Posts: 89 Member
    Since you mentioned you do it when you are bored, I agree trying out a hobby or something to keep your mind occupied might help. I cross stitch and it is something that helps me keep both my hands and mind busy.

    While you may not be able to control if it is in the house or not, try seeing if it can be put in different places. A high shelf, in a cabinet, and such, so that it isn't in visible sight. When you go to reach for it, then you may really think to yourself "Do I really want/need this right now?"
  • Liftng4Lis
    Liftng4Lis Posts: 15,151 Member
    Either A. make it fit into your allotment, B. restrain yourself or C. get it out of the house.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,832 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    Xandistra wrote: »
    okay so every night I'll find myself eating 500kcals worth of peanut butter even though I'm not hungry, and it'll sometimes lead to a full out binge. How can I help break this habit? I've gained 15lbs over the past 3months because of it :(

    I keep my peanut butter in the car. There is no way I am going to run down 2 flights of stairs in my pj's to get it.

    In other words, don't keep it in the house until you gain more self control.

    Ya, when my coworkers send me candy for Christmas, I give it to my fiance to keep it in his car.

  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    Liftng4Lis wrote: »
    Either A. make it fit into your allotment, B. restrain yourself or C. get it out of the house.

    Any of those would work. Restraint being the most practical.

  • LavenderLeaves
    LavenderLeaves Posts: 195 Member
    edited July 2015
    DanniB423 wrote: »

    I saw those as helpful suggestions for alternatives vs a blatant and dry "don't/stop". That's all.


    Exactly. Simply saying "just stop" isn't helpful. How about actually giving suggestions HOW to stop? Food compulsions are just that, and acting like a compulsion is something we just instantly know how to deal with is simplifying a problem. It's a learning process that takes time. Why not offer some of the ways YOU dealt with food compulsions? It's a heck of a lot more helpful than saying "just stop." Also the "Maybe eating peanut butter is just more important to you than losing weight." was also incredibly unhelpful and came across as judgey, to whoever claimed no one was making unhelpful or judgmental comments.

    That being said, hopefully OP actually answers some of the questions and suggestions being offered up! It's no fun feeling like you have no control with certain foods and there are some good suggestions.
  • DuckReconMajor
    DuckReconMajor Posts: 434 Member
    OP I understand what it's like to be in an environment where someone else buys all the food. Definitely makes things harder.

    Things you can do.

    1) Make sure you aren't restricting your calories too low. Set a moderate weight loss goal and try to get close to your calorie allotment for the day. The "*kitten* it I'm just gonna eat it all" feelings are much more frequent/strong when you cut your calories too low.
    2) Try to eat more filling foods throughout the day. A lot of times these are vegetables and foods high in protein.
    3) When you eat the peanut butter, eat some (a small amount you can log accurately), then drink some water, preferably a cup or so. You'll fill up much faster
    4) Not sure exactly but your post makes it sound like this is part of a habit/routine and is less about the peanut butter itself. If this is the case Google "breaking habit loops" and read up on it, should be helpful.
  • alexandreafrank20
    alexandreafrank20 Posts: 3 Member
    Xandistra wrote: »
    okay so every night I'll find myself eating 500kcals worth of peanut butter even though I'm not hungry, and it'll sometimes lead to a full out binge. How can I help break this habit? I've gained 15lbs over the past 3months because of it :(
    I had the same problem girl!! Peanut butter is my weaknessssss!!!! Lol but I've found that anytime I think about eating something that's high in calories late at night, I'll do one of 2 things: drink a whole glass of water (it will make me feel full) or I will take a walk around the block/jog in place for 10 minutes. Keep reminding yourself of that body you want! This may sound weird too but I keep pictures of the body I want in my phone as a way of reminding myself "God I wish I looked like that" so I'll be more motivated. I'm however new to myfitnesspal I've tried many times to lose weight on my own by eating what I thought was healthy, salads, avocado, soups, etc. only to find out I gained weight! So try and keep to vegetables, tuna, some fruit in the morning and LOTS of water! If you can consume 8 glasses of water a day, your metabolism will go up about 30%! Hope this help, keep on truckin!!! I had the same problem living with my parents lol they loved junk!
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    Xandistra wrote: »
    okay so every night I'll find myself eating 500kcals worth of peanut butter even though I'm not hungry...

    Go to sleep.

    Or do something active.

    Or don't buy the stuff.

    Problem solved...
  • DeguelloTex
    DeguelloTex Posts: 6,658 Member
    DanniB423 wrote: »

    I saw those as helpful suggestions for alternatives vs a blatant and dry "don't/stop". That's all.


    Exactly. Simply saying "just stop" isn't helpful. How about actually giving suggestions HOW to stop? Food compulsions are just that, and acting like a compulsion is something we just instantly know how to deal with is simplifying a problem. It's a learning process that takes time. Why not offer some of the ways YOU dealt with food compulsions? It's a heck of a lot more helpful than saying "just stop." Also the "Maybe eating peanut butter is just more important to you than losing weight." was also incredibly unhelpful and came across as judgey, to whoever claimed no one was making unhelpful or judgmental comments. .
    "Food compulsions" assumes facts not in evidence.

    I dealt with eating too much by not eating too much. If I didn't have enough calories left for the day, I didn't eat it. I just stopped.

    Saying that one thing appears more important than another isn't judgey. It's stating a fact. If you find facts unhelpful, the world's going to appear to be a very harsh place indeed. HOW to stop would be to decide that losing weight is more important than the peanut butter and to decide, therefore, not to eat it.

  • LavenderLeaves
    LavenderLeaves Posts: 195 Member
    edited July 2015
    "Food compulsions" assumes facts not in evidence.

    I dealt with eating too much by not eating too much. If I didn't have enough calories left for the day, I didn't eat it. I just stopped.

    Saying that one thing appears more important than another isn't judgey. It's stating a fact. If you find facts unhelpful, the world's going to appear to be a very harsh place indeed. HOW to stop would be to decide that losing weight is more important than the peanut butter and to decide, therefore, not to eat it.

    That's great for you, but for other people it's not as easy as simply stopping, which OP clearly stated in her post. If she were able to simply stop when she uses up her calories for the day, she wouldn't have to be making a post, now would she? Some people do not know how to stop eating when they have fulfilled their calories for their day. It's not my fault if you can't use common sense and realize when someone is having trouble learning how to get to the point where they can simply stop for the day. I find facts massively helpful, by the way, but on a forum like this, they can be completely useless if someone needs help trying to *practice* those facts.

  • DeguelloTex
    DeguelloTex Posts: 6,658 Member
    If I had a dollar for every time a student of mine told me she couldn't do something only to be able to end up doing it quite easily when excuses were discarded...
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    Is the "compulsion" to eat it, or to buy it?

    Because if you don't buy it, then the eating "compulsion" becomes irrelevant.
  • LavenderLeaves
    LavenderLeaves Posts: 195 Member
    I'll agree with that much, Mr_Knight. And Deg - that's great that for you things are so easy, and I mean that seriously, NOT being sarcastic. For a lot of people simply stopping by looking at their calorie limit for the day is not something they can do without learning how to. OP clearly wants advice on what she can do to change, and there's no telling if she'll even come back and be able to take any advice, but when someone is asking for help, usually they're asking for coping mechanisms on HOW to stop.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,832 Member
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    Is the "compulsion" to eat it, or to buy it?

    Because if you don't buy it, then the eating "compulsion" becomes irrelevant.

    Her parents are the ones buying it.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,832 Member
    DanniB423 wrote: »

    I saw those as helpful suggestions for alternatives vs a blatant and dry "don't/stop". That's all.


    Exactly. Simply saying "just stop" isn't helpful. How about actually giving suggestions HOW to stop? Food compulsions are just that, and acting like a compulsion is something we just instantly know how to deal with is simplifying a problem. It's a learning process that takes time. Why not offer some of the ways YOU dealt with food compulsions? It's a heck of a lot more helpful than saying "just stop." Also the "Maybe eating peanut butter is just more important to you than losing weight." was also incredibly unhelpful and came across as judgey, to whoever claimed no one was making unhelpful or judgmental comments.

    That being said, hopefully OP actually answers some of the questions and suggestions being offered up! It's no fun feeling like you have no control with certain foods and there are some good suggestions.

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  • DanniB423
    DanniB423 Posts: 773 Member
    *bows down to @DeguelloTex* For you are strong and we are weak! I'm glad your journey has been such a walk in the park.
  • cindyangotti
    cindyangotti Posts: 294 Member
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    Is the "compulsion" to eat it, or to buy it?

    Because if you don't buy it, then the eating "compulsion" becomes irrelevant.

    Unless the parents buy it then the compulsion remains relevant.

  • Kalikel
    Kalikel Posts: 9,626 Member
    You want to eat peanut butter. Before every bite you take, remind yourself, "I want this, so I'm eating it."

    Until you start realizing that all your food choices are CHOICES and not things that are out of your control, this will continue. For a while, you have to remind yourself that you're choosing every bite,

    Once you accept that you choose it (and it will take a while), you can't choose not to.

    Good luck. :)
  • kelleybean1
    kelleybean1 Posts: 312 Member
    MAKE yourself go cold turkey till you can break the habit. Eat a lower calorie snack like a 100 calorie Chobani yogurt instead, or brush your teeth, or chew some gum, or maybe all three of these suggestions. After a couple of weeks PB free it will get easier. I have the same weakness!
  • JenniferIsLosingIt
    JenniferIsLosingIt Posts: 595 Member
    Out of curiosity, how many calories are you eating during the day? Do you eat PB during the daytime at all or is it something you're trying to swear yourself off of simply because it's calorie dense? Lot of really judgey, unhelpful comments in this thread for some reason. :|

    Girl thats every day on here :(