Marathon Training Panic

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Replies

  • mbaker566
    mbaker566 Posts: 11,234 Member
    edited August 2015
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    How can people climb Mt. Everest if they've never climbed Mt. Everest? They train on smaller mountains, and the skill that they obtain from all those climbs is enough to get them to the top. (and back down safely)

    while mountain climbing is strenuous, it's not quite the same thing, that I understand perfectly find.
    JoRocka wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    it's only 0.23 of the total run.

    so about 1/4. that seems like a lot. a whole other six miles :o
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,552 Member
    moyer566 wrote: »
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    How can people climb Mt. Everest if they've never climbed Mt. Everest? They train on smaller mountains, and the skill that they obtain from all those climbs is enough to get them to the top. (and back down safely)

    while mountain climbing is strenuous, it's not quite the same thing, that I understand perfectly find.
    JoRocka wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    it's only 0.23 of the total run.

    so about 1/4. that seems like a lot. a whole other six miles :o

    after you've already come 20 another 6.1 is mentally far more demanding than physically.
  • PikaKnight
    PikaKnight Posts: 34,973 Member
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    How can people climb Mt. Everest if they've never climbed Mt. Everest? They train on smaller mountains, and the skill that they obtain from all those climbs is enough to get them to the top. (and back down safely)

    Wow. I love that analogy. Mind blown.
  • mbaker566
    mbaker566 Posts: 11,234 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    How can people climb Mt. Everest if they've never climbed Mt. Everest? They train on smaller mountains, and the skill that they obtain from all those climbs is enough to get them to the top. (and back down safely)

    while mountain climbing is strenuous, it's not quite the same thing, that I understand perfectly find.
    JoRocka wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    it's only 0.23 of the total run.

    so about 1/4. that seems like a lot. a whole other six miles :o

    after you've already come 20 another 6.1 is mentally far more demanding than physically.

    fair enough. only running six now...it seems like a lot but I suppose not to more experienced runners:)
  • 3dogsrunning
    3dogsrunning Posts: 27,178 Member
    edited August 2015
    moyer566 wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    How can people climb Mt. Everest if they've never climbed Mt. Everest? They train on smaller mountains, and the skill that they obtain from all those climbs is enough to get them to the top. (and back down safely)

    while mountain climbing is strenuous, it's not quite the same thing, that I understand perfectly find.
    JoRocka wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    it's only 0.23 of the total run.

    so about 1/4. that seems like a lot. a whole other six miles :o

    after you've already come 20 another 6.1 is mentally far more demanding than physically.

    fair enough. only running six now...it seems like a lot but I suppose not to more experienced runners:)

    The whole "I feel like I should go further than 20 miles" in training for a marathon is a very, very common thought but the prevailing advice from every expert I've seen is that going past that mark is not a good idea to for the reasons already stated in this thread.
  • mbaker566
    mbaker566 Posts: 11,234 Member
    moyer566 wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    How can people climb Mt. Everest if they've never climbed Mt. Everest? They train on smaller mountains, and the skill that they obtain from all those climbs is enough to get them to the top. (and back down safely)

    while mountain climbing is strenuous, it's not quite the same thing, that I understand perfectly find.
    JoRocka wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    it's only 0.23 of the total run.

    so about 1/4. that seems like a lot. a whole other six miles :o

    after you've already come 20 another 6.1 is mentally far more demanding than physically.

    fair enough. only running six now...it seems like a lot but I suppose not to more experienced runners:)

    The whole "I feel like I should go further than 20 miles" in training for a marathon is a very, very common thought but the prevailing advice from every expert I've seen is that going past that mark is not a good idea to for the reasons already stated in this thread.

    I understand, I read the article as well. but still boggling :)
    but the article explained it well
  • JustChristy79
    JustChristy79 Posts: 156 Member
    mwyvr wrote: »

    Prediction: instead of panic you are going to be giggling with delight when you hit these big new milestones. Just get to the first all time longest milestone and let that feeling carry you through all the rest. :smiley:

    This! Or you'll be so proud you'll start to cry and quickly realize it's really hard to run, breath & cry. I almost died that way. True story. :wink:

  • veganbettie
    veganbettie Posts: 730 Member
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    moyer566 wrote: »
    I could see running 23 but only running 20, that's nearly adding another 1/3rd of the distance, or 1/4. something. it's a lot

    How can people climb Mt. Everest if they've never climbed Mt. Everest? They train on smaller mountains, and the skill that they obtain from all those climbs is enough to get them to the top. (and back down safely)

    I'm going to start training for a full starting next year, thanks for this, that idea is really going to help me. Looking at the training plan i'm like whaat only 20 miles?! I have to go further than that!
  • litsy3
    litsy3 Posts: 783 Member
    I think if you are worried about not doing long enough runs, it might be better to think of your training in terms of total weekly mileage instead. So if you do more miles in the week in total, that's probably going to help your training a lot more than doing, say, 35 miles but your long run is more than half that.
  • _Waffle_
    _Waffle_ Posts: 13,051 Member
    litsy3 wrote: »
    I think if you are worried about not doing long enough runs, it might be better to think of your training in terms of total weekly mileage instead. So if you do more miles in the week in total, that's probably going to help your training a lot more than doing, say, 35 miles but your long run is more than half that.
    That's mostly likely a bigger factory than your longest long run. If you run 50 miles a week and only do a 16 mile long run max you'll probably do better than someone that runs 30 miles per week with a 20 mile long run. I'm thinking about doing another full in December. I'm not doing a set training plan yet. I'm just working on miles per week. I should hit 38 miles this week.