heart rate

Can anyone tell me what my heart rate should be while doing cardio for maximum weight loss?

Replies

  • brianpperkins
    brianpperkins Posts: 6,124 Member
    edited September 2015
    Greater than zero.

    There is no magic heart rate. HR is actually a very individual thing.
  • hugheseva
    hugheseva Posts: 227 Member
    You should keep it between 65% and 80% of your weight - age number. Example: you weigh 170 lbs and your are 30 yrs old. 170-30=140 so heart rate should be between 91-112.
  • kandeelopez
    kandeelopez Posts: 61 Member
    edited September 2015
    hugheseva wrote: »
    You should keep it between 65% and 80% of your weight - age number. Example: you weigh 170 lbs and your are 30 yrs old. 170-30=140 so heart rate should be between 91-112.

    For me, I get at this HR at just a fast walk. I won't break a sweat like this, not to mention it's boring. I go by how I feel, although I track with a Polar HR strap and watch.
  • 7lenny7
    7lenny7 Posts: 3,412 Member
    hugheseva wrote: »
    You should keep it between 65% and 80% of your weight - age number. Example: you weigh 170 lbs and your are 30 yrs old. 170-30=140 so heart rate should be between 91-112.

    That make absolutely no sense. An obese person weighing 330 and age 30 would aim for 195 to 240 with your formula. Good luck with that.

    A person weighing 130 and age 50 would aim for a heart rate of 51 to 64 with your formula.



  • zoeysasha37
    zoeysasha37 Posts: 7,092 Member
    7lenny7 wrote: »
    hugheseva wrote: »
    You should keep it between 65% and 80% of your weight - age number. Example: you weigh 170 lbs and your are 30 yrs old. 170-30=140 so heart rate should be between 91-112.

    That make absolutely no sense. An obese person weighing 330 and age 30 would aim for 195 to 240 with your formula. Good luck with that.

    A person weighing 130 and age 50 would aim for a heart rate of 51 to 64 with your formula.



    Using this formula , mine would be about 46. That's not right .
  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
    @7lenny7 Love those examples!

    @hugheseva I'm with the rest - that weight based formula makes no sense at all.

    @tkt19900 You'll maximize your weight loss by eating at a deficit, not by targeting a specific heart rate range.
  • Becky_charles29
    Becky_charles29 Posts: 125 Member
    I always thought the "average" calculation was 220 minus your age for max hr. Mine would be 191, then work to 60% for warm up, all the way up to 80/85% for high intensity - which for me is 153-160. However, my hr differs. Spinning, I have to really go some to get up to 150, running, my hr rests at around 155-160 and I feel fine. It is a very individual thing so the best bet is to get a hrm with a chest strap and work out your own levels. It's not necessarily what the screen tells you but how you feel
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,863 Member
    tkt19900 wrote: »
    Can anyone tell me what my heart rate should be while doing cardio for maximum weight loss?

    For me it's an average of 130bpm because I maintained that for 8hrs 44mins.
    Then again I spent most of that time eating as well as cycling so weight loss wasn't really the aim. ;)

    There isn't one particular HR to aim for. Diet for weight loss, exercise for fitness.
  • McCloud33
    McCloud33 Posts: 959 Member
    I aim for 85-90% of max hr...but that's just me. Go hard or go home LOL
  • Dichotomy1976
    Dichotomy1976 Posts: 93 Member
    For maximum weight loss your heart rate should be 100% of your maximum. Of course no one could do that so the answer is your heart rate should be at a level you can just maintain for the entire duration of your cardio workout. Personally I wouldn't concentrate on or worry about your heart rate and just do your workout to the best of your ability.
  • dlm7507
    dlm7507 Posts: 237 Member
    For weight loss, eat less and make it real food.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,176 Member
    hugheseva wrote: »
    You should keep it between 65% and 80% of your weight - age number. Example: you weigh 170 lbs and your are 30 yrs old. 170-30=140 so heart rate should be between 91-112.

    Where did you get this? It makes no sense whatsoever. (Maybe you're thinking of 220 - your age which is also not terribly accurate)

    OP weight loss is a function of energy balance and happens mostly in your kitchen. In terms of target heart rate forget the whole notion of the so-called "fat burning zone" and focus on an exercise program that is sustainable. progressive and enjoyable. Obviously the more you do the more calories you burn and, theoretically, the more weight you can (assuming you're eating at a deficit) lose but you don't want to overdo it and end up burned out.

  • belgerian
    belgerian Posts: 1,057 Member
    edited September 2015
    They say for optimum cardio it should be around 80 percent of your Max you figure your max by 220-your age (a general formula used) then multiply that by .8. So 220-46=174 times .80 is 139. But of course there is no magic number for weight loss. You loose weight by maintaining a calorie deficit which is achieved by a combination of diet and physical activity. Also as your body gets conditioned to the physical activity your Max HR will increase

    Also since this is your first post here I would suggest researching to see what your BMR is what your TDEE so you can figure out your Deficit. If these abbreviations confuse you do a search on the forums. I have learned a lot by reading the forums just try to stay away from the Bro-Science. And I continue to learn much more. Use the log to keep track of your intake.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,176 Member
    dlm7507 wrote: »
    For weight loss, eat less and make it real food.

    What's "real food"?

    Not that I'm recommending this......

    cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/11/08/twinkie.diet.professor/

  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
    OP - @tkt19900 it'd be good if you come back to your thread! You can work out at a higher heart rate for less time, before you collapse, or instead work out at a lower heart rate well within your aerobic capacity and go longer, perhaps much longer from a calorie burn perspective. Instead of trying to micro-target heart rate for calorie burn perspective you ought to figure out what's the best approach for your exercise or activity of choice.

    For example, if you decide that you'd like to learn to run to improve fitness, few would suggest you go do sprints near max effort and HR all the time; instead you'd be advised to do 80% of your training at slower paces and lower heart rates.

    @hugheseva If you want a more useful formula for identifying an exercise HR range that should be well within an individual's aerobic capacity, training at which is useful for building endurance over time, try: 180 - age. Google Phil Maffetone, MAF method. Subtract 10 from that and you've got the bottom end of your range.

    180 - 20 years = 160 so 150-160
    180 - 50 years = 130 so 120-130

    Given our maximum heart rate achievable drops as we age, this approach (like the 220 approach) makes more sense than estimating based on weight as you suggested.
  • dixeybelle2
    dixeybelle2 Posts: 1 Member
    Just bought a Polar FT4 but can't get the HR to register. Is this due to my layer of fat or haven't I got it tight enough.
  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
    edited September 2015
    Just bought a Polar FT4 but can't get the HR to register. Is this due to my layer of fat or haven't I got it tight enough.

    @dixeybelle2 It may be the battery in the transmitter, but first check:

    Did you wet the electrode areas on the strap? Firmly click in the transmitter? Is it facing the right direction (logo facing up when worn)? Strap on tightly but comfortably, making contact with your skin?

    If you are already have it mounted and are wearing it properly a battery replacement may be needed although it shouldn't be dead new out of the box. Is the device used / second hand?

    Info:
  • tkt19900
    tkt19900 Posts: 9 Member
    Thank you to everyone for all the input, it was very helpful
  • whitty406
    whitty406 Posts: 1 Member
    Hi
    Like your first reply everybody's different, but what I would say is that the further you run and the longer your on your feet the more calories you will burn. A 10m run at 9min miles would burn approx 1200 calories. For marathon runners like myself being able to push the time on your feet with the correct training and conditioning your able to train your body to use fat as an energy source when your carb stores are depleted in the latter part of a long run. You will burn far more calories doing long steady runs than short quick runs ie 5 and 10k. However fartlek and interval training which consists of short burst sprints then slow recovery laps can also work for weight loss as this will send your metabolism in to overdrive therefore burning calories well after the workout has ended. Trial and error is key but give your body time to adapt.