Please help

2

Replies

  • Verdenal
    Verdenal Posts: 625 Member
    edited September 2015
    As others have said, make a doctor's appointment to rule out physical problems, and remove all binge-worthy food from the house or have it placed out of the way. I myself would even consider a safe with a timer lock like this if they were bigger and if I lived alone:

    http://www.amazon.com/Kitchen-Safe-Locking-Container-Height/dp/B00JGFQTD2

    Cultivate activities that make eating difficult, such as walking, sewing, woodworking, etc.

    I sympathize because I increasingly have problems with this even though I am mindful of not being hungry: it's as if the boredom and frustration win out sometimes. I do much better when I'm on my own because I don't bring junk food into the house.
  • juggernaut1974
    juggernaut1974 Posts: 6,212 Member
    RobinDream wrote: »
    Hi, I am reading a book called The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Diet Detox. You may find that some of what you are experiencing is addressed.
    Best of luck.

    http://www.amazon.com/Blood-Sugar-Solution-10-Day-Detox/dp/0316230022/ref=pd_sim_14_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1TSVJWEPY9ZKGAB7TG88&dpSrc=sims&dpST=_AC_UL320_SR206,320_

    No

    I think I got BINGO just from the title alone.
  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    Are you always hungry, or are you not always hungry? How do you know that you are hungry? What does it feel like? What does it feel like when you're more hungry and less hungry? What is your favorite food?

    Do you eat meals? Use the food diary to plan 3-5 meals a day, carefully portioned to give you what you know you need of calories and nutrients. Eat, and then stop eating, even if you don't feel full. You are not going to die.

    You aren't going to stop eating for good. You must only stop overeating, and eating all the time.

    Not willpower. Just determination. Do what you want, but aim to do what you really want.
  • JamestheLiar
    JamestheLiar Posts: 148 Member
    edited September 2015
    Are you always hungry, or are you not always hungry? How do you know that you are hungry? What does it feel like? What does it feel like when you're more hungry and less hungry? What is your favorite food?

    Do you eat meals? Use the food diary to plan 3-5 meals a day, carefully portioned to give you what you know you need of calories and nutrients. Eat, and then stop eating, even if you don't feel full. You are not going to die.

    You aren't going to stop eating for good. You must only stop overeating, and eating all the time.

    Not willpower. Just determination. Do what you want, but aim to do what you really want.

    I just want to say amen to the bolded section above (the rest of it is a little ... question-y).

    Look, OP ... in your post you said you're addicted to "all food" not just junk food. Do your realize how lucky you are? I have about 20 or so things that I enjoy eating on a constant life-long rotation, but you have all food. So I say that If you're addicted to all food, then go ahead and eat up. Eat, you magnificent non-picky eater! Just eat broccoli or some other such low calorie food choice. Watermelon is good. Tomatoes. See? I have a very short list. You have a very long list. You don't have to stop eating, you just have to eat fewer calories.

    ETA: I'm actually surprised that the "addicted to food" firestorm hasn't fallen onto this thread yet. Impressive.
  • callsitlikeiseeit
    callsitlikeiseeit Posts: 8,633 Member
    see a therapist
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,827 Member
    Gavin - are you focusing on fullness enhancing meals? When I eat some types of food, I never reach satiety so want to eat and eat and eat.

    Understanding satiety: feeling full after a meal

    Tips on how to feel fuller

    So how can we best try to enhance these feelings of fullness to help us control how much we eat? Here are some top tips for helping you feel fuller:
    1. Foods high in protein seem to make us feel fuller than foods high in fat or carbohydrate, so including some protein at every meal should help keep you satisfied. Foods high in protein include meats such as chicken, ham or beef, fish, eggs, beans and pulses.
    2. If you are watching your weight, opt for lower fat versions, using leaner cuts of meat, cutting off visible fat and avoiding the skin on poultry as this will help reduce the energy density of the diet, which can help to enhance satiety (see below).
    3. Foods that are high in fibre may also enhance feelings of fullness so try to include plenty of high-fibre foods in the diet such as wholegrain bread and cereals, beans and pulses and fruit and vegetables.
    4. Alcohol seems to stimulate appetite in the short-term and therefore drinking alcohol is likely to encourage us to eat more. Alcoholic beverages can make you forget about your intentions to eat healthily by making you lose your inhibitions. Alcoholic drinks are also calorific, so you should cut down on alcohol consumption if you are trying to control your weight.
    5. The ‘energy density’ of food has a strong influence on feelings of fullness or satiety. Energy density is the amount of energy (or calories) per gram of food. Lower energy density foods provide less energy per gram of food so you can eat more of them without consuming too many calories. Low energy density foods include fruit and vegetables, foods with lots of water added when cooking such as soups and stews, and lower fat foods. Click here for more information on energy density.

    Read more: http://www.nutrition.org.uk/healthyliving/fuller/understanding-satiety-feeling-full-after-a-meal.html
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited September 2015
    I agree with those who said that seeing a therapist could help.

    Beyond that, we need more information.
    gav1901 wrote: »
    I'm always hungry. Even when not I eat.

    Is there anything I can do to stop myself? I know you will all say willpower but I am trying and still not getting anywhere.

    How many calories are you eating currently? If you let yourself just eat as you are used to, how much do you eat?

    When you are eating because you are hungry, when is this? What have you eaten before? Are you eating because you think you should eat if hungry or do you have cravings or intense hunger that is hard to ignore?

    What I found is that I'd be hungry at first at times I was used to eating. If I just ate low cal stuff (raw veggies) or distracted myself it went away and after not too long I got used to my new eating schedule and was fine -- it was mental hunger, not physical hunger.

    The same is of course going to be true with the times you eat when not hungry. Are there patterns to this? Try to be mindful and figure out why you want to eat. I stress ate a lot and am still prone to this from time to time and analyzing it I think a lot of it is about either self-comfort or procrastination, for me.

    I think the Duhrigg habit book that was recommended above is a really good one, and you also might want to check out Brian Wansink's books. They give a good understanding of some of the forces that I think result in people feeling uncontrolled around food -- largely because of habits.

    Finally, another thing that I think makes a big difference is sleep. Not only does a lack of sleep interfere with will power, but your body will look to food to provide quick energy. A lot of people end up in a cycle of using food in this way.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,827 Member
    Yes, Brian Wansink's "Mindless Eating" had lots of good tips. It was available through my library system.
  • WBB55
    WBB55 Posts: 4,131 Member
    I wanted to share how things were when i was at my worst. It wasn't in particular that I was always "hungry" it was more that I could always eat and was never "full." Like, I never felt "done."

    If you can relate to that, what worked for me was to watch the clock and stop believing my brain. If I'd had a 500 calorie meal and 2 hours later I "felt" hungry, then that was my brain LYING TO ME. 500 calories of just about any food (please note this didn't work for me if I drank calories instead of eating them) is technically enough food to last me 5 hours. I'm not saying it's easy, and I'm not saying it happened overnight. But if you are eating at a deficit appropriate to your body then things like having some tea, drinking broth, chewing gum, etc., would keep me until THE CLOCK told me it was time to eat again. If I couldn't resist the urge to eat, I walked, I knitted, I did laundry ANYTHING to keep me out of the kitchen. If I simply couldn't take it any more, then I would eat no more than 100 calories of something (cheese stick, piece of fruit, jello, for instance) until THE CLOCK told me it was time to eat again. The stomach and brain LIES TO YOU.
  • Eldow1977
    Eldow1977 Posts: 48 Member
    I don't think people really understand.

    Yes there was probably a time that I would have said I was addicted to food, I'm not, but that because I'm getting to know what food means to me.

    I have become aware over the years that "I would rather.......!, eat chocolate than go for a walk, take the lift than the stairs. That doesn't mean I've done anything about it.

    I've tried Slimmingworld, on and off but in reality I just couldn't be bothered.

    I'm not saying this is the same for you, I'm just saying figure out what food means for you.

    So when I sat there, knowing all the things I've learnt about myself and done nothing with it and the doctor was telling my husband and I that he needed a triple heart bypass at the age of 47 and I'm 180 over weight I figured this was wrong.

    I'm grateful I don't have any health problems.

    This has taught me I don't need to diet!!!!! It has taught me that I put food in my mouth with no awareness of what it is.

    So I joined here nearly 3 weeks ago, last week I had Chinese takeaway twice. I've had McDonalds aswell but I've counted the calories and stick under my allowance.

    My next decision was not to exercise yet. I don't want to, I really can't be bothered. Hate it with a passion. That may change but learning from everything I've done in the past I know I will go hell for leather and in three weeks I'll have quit exercise and diet.

    My final and possible strangest decision was to not weigh myself each week. I'm going to weigh once a month because I know I'll reward myself if I've done well and drown my sorrows (in food) if I haven't.

    I am a comfort eater.

    I would consider tracking everything you eat for a week. I know MFP will give you a calorie allowance but if that's a lot less than you are eating then that going to be really hard on you. If you track everyone and your days vary from 3000 to 3500 then start with committing to 3000 if you can do this 95% of the time then you are doing the same as everyone else on here. Lets face it, we all have days where we are a little bit naughty.

    Then move that to 2900 or 2800 calories and so on.

    I'm currently weighing 304 lbs and I'm 5 2 but you know what, no stress I'm feeling good, and I'm not feeling deprived.

    Add me as a friend if you wish.
  • txcraftr
    txcraftr Posts: 133 Member
    I used to think I was addicted to food but tried the food addiction diet (KayShepard. Com) and found out that wheat of any kind with gluten makes me want to keep eating. I never felt full and would binge. As long as I don't eat glutenous food I can control my intake and make better choices like fruit and veggies. Try it. Your body might be sensitive to gluten too.
  • alt5057
    alt5057 Posts: 62 Member
    I find if I can keep myself doing something it helps me keep from constantly snacking in the evenings like I want to...walk the dog, do some sort of crafty thing...something that keeps me and/or my hands busy so I am not just reaching for food.

    I have heard of people chewing gum...that doesn't work much for me because I get bored with gum after a few minutes. I sometimes will have a crystal light packet (10 cals vs whatever else I would be snacking on that is way higher) or have in the past brushed my teeth because then if I eat anything soon after it will mix with the minty toothpaste and taste disgusting. haha
  • dhimaan
    dhimaan Posts: 774 Member
    Time to visit a shrink.
  • 89GermanG
    89GermanG Posts: 73 Member
    I had the same problem bc I was depressed. I used to eat a lot when I feel bad or when I'm unhappy. How's it going at work, home, private life? Maybe you should see a doctor? Good luck!
  • booksandchocolate12
    booksandchocolate12 Posts: 1,741 Member
    Sometimes, the only thing you can do is buck up and tell yourself "NO!"

    (That was my version of "just stop").
  • rsclause
    rsclause Posts: 3,103 Member
    Your in a bad spot. A drug addict can stop using, an alcoholic can stop drinking but you will never be able to swear off food. You must find a way to break the connection between you and the feeling that you crave when over eating. I think that this one will need to be given over to professionals to solve.
  • kimny72
    kimny72 Posts: 16,027 Member
    OP, you have gotten some great advise for creating good habits and redirecting your mind. I wanted to add one thing, which is probably really my version of Just Stop, but maybe it will help.

    As long as you believe that you have no control, that it's not your fault and you can't help it, then you will continue to have no control.

    We all have situations where we have to take control and do something difficult, where we have to dig down and do something that takes effort, hard work, something we don't want to do.

    Every time you overeat, it's because you chose to overeat. I know it isn't really that simple, but ultimately that is the truth. So if you finish eating and realize it was way more than you should have, don't feel helpless and give up. Decide to make a better choice next time.

    You have to believe you can change the way you eat, try all of these suggestions and tips to find what works for you, and get it done. The first couple of things you try might not work, but keep trying and learning until you get it right. Good luck!
  • gav1901
    gav1901 Posts: 7 Member
    thank you for most of the comments, I am going to write down notes on what everyone has said and try to implement them. Yes I'm weak when it comes to food, yes I don't have any willpower to stop it. I'm currently battling depression and other medical problems so its hard to keep on top of everything.

    I have to lose 10kg before January. That is why I am desperate for help. The doctor has said there is nothing he can do and I have to do it myself.

    Thank you for all your advice
  • kandeelopez
    kandeelopez Posts: 61 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    OP, you have gotten some great advise for creating good habits and redirecting your mind. I wanted to add one thing, which is probably really my version of Just Stop, but maybe it will help.

    As long as you believe that you have no control, that it's not your fault and you can't help it, then you will continue to have no control.

    We all have situations where we have to take control and do something difficult, where we have to dig down and do something that takes effort, hard work, something we don't want to do.

    Every time you overeat, it's because you chose to overeat. I know it isn't really that simple, but ultimately that is the truth. So if you finish eating and realize it was way more than you should have, don't feel helpless and give up. Decide to make a better choice next time.

    You have to believe you can change the way you eat, try all of these suggestions and tips to find what works for you, and get it done. The first couple of things you try might not work, but keep trying and learning until you get it right. Good luck!

    I second this! Also, please read "Battlefield of the Mind" by Joyce Meyer.
  • Venus_Red
    Venus_Red Posts: 209 Member
    I would suggest you never read anything Joyce Meyer has written...but I digress.

    You aren't addicted to food in any way - no one is. Food doesn't alter your brain chemical composition lending itself to an addiction. You have a behavioral disposition to food. There are people who have a medical condition that makes them sensitive to gluten. If you do not have this condition, gluten is not your problem.