Gaining weight after weight-loss and what can you do?

So, as I sit here in my office job waiting for clients to get back to me I thought it would be a good time to update on my life goals.

First of all, refer to my BLOG post I created almost 4 years ago when I were 90kg. (http://www.myfitnesspal.com/blog/Chadwick891/view/motivation-to-your-new-body-180907)

Now, let me tell you that I am no longer 90KG. I am now 130KG as I weighed in this morning.

That's 40KG increase. That's massive.

So what happened?

Life happened. I got caught up in life and all its glory. I was reasonably fit following that for years until I moved away from home and started living on my own I started to become lazy and was working in a restaurant (which didn't help). I no longer tracked my weight, I no longer exercised and all I were interested in was going out and having a good time.

Not only was I gaining weight but a few emotional issues happened. One, my girlfriend was cheating on me and two, my mother who had been suffering with cancer for 12 years at that point was having issues and I was in no state of mind to handle all this and started emotionally eating.

Nowadays, I have no excuses for my weight being so high. I should mention that I intentionally gained weight early on to bulk and hit a few personal bests which I was very proud of but that bulk went from 90KG to 105KG. I still put on 25KG of just fatty, body weight.

What can you do? Simple.

For emotional eaters, put yourself in a state of mind that makes you happy. Think about what would make you happy when you wake up, write down everything that would make you happy. At the end of the day, write down what happened. Reflect on what happened and what would make you happy and adjust accordingly.

In my case, I was unhappy working in a factory full time and feeling like I have no where to go in life. Here I am months later working in an office, having clients that I genuinely help and each day at the end of the day I am happy.

I got motivated, bought a huge amount of weights for my home gym with my girlfriend (a sound investment) and have already lost 3KG from my starting weight of 133KG. I am eating less which is easier when I am happy whereas being unhappy I would just naturally eat more.

Be aware that I have had intensive experience with dieting and exercise and have studied biomedical science with a keen interest of nutritional science and take a lot on board of how certain foods and dieting can affect me in a positive way. I will not be following the strict diet I have done in my previous MFP blog as I now understand flexible dieting and the benefits of tracking macro and micrornutrients.

I also have experience with military martial arts and do a lot of extra curricular training on top of my weighted training for better results. It is definitely a lot easier with a job that makes me happy since at the end of every day I actually feel like I've done something with my life and that feeling is great.

For all other people, I'm not sure of your situation or circumstances and how losing weight is difficult and what boundaries are set in place for you but what I am sure of is that everyone can do it. You need to sit down and reflect on what is causing you to lose hope, whether it's the need for instant gratification, insatiable hunger, emotional eating or many other determining factors. Persistence and hard work is what will get you to your goal and at the end of it you will learn the value of working towards a goal and this will be reflected in more areas of your life (Whether it be your career or hobbies that you set challenging goals for and work towards).

Good luck everyone! Sorry for the huge wall of text. I hope it helps and I wish everyone a happy 6th of October. :wink:

If you want to track my progress feel free to add me. I will be doing this over the course of 3 months and release a blog post with my results at the end to compare to my previous results in my previous blog. It's you guys that will hold me accountable!

Chad :smiley:

Replies

  • SherryTeach
    SherryTeach Posts: 2,836 Member
    Hum. I have been weighing and measuring everything and wearing a fitbit. I've been at my goal weight for almost three years. I don't think I'm hanging on by a thread. In fact, I'm enjoying my life quite a bit. Maintaining awareness of how much you need to eat and working in some exercise seems to be one big factor in a person's ability to maintain.
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    Hum. I have been weighing and measuring everything and wearing a fitbit. I've been at my goal weight for almost three years. I don't think I'm hanging on by a thread. In fact, I'm enjoying my life quite a bit. Maintaining awareness of how much you need to eat and working in some exercise seems to be one big factor in a person's ability to maintain.

    This.

    @robbackatya, I disagree that most people gain their weight back. Some people do.
  • gertudejekyl
    gertudejekyl Posts: 385 Member
    edited October 2015
    Most people will gain weight back that they lose if they ever lose it. It doesn't have to be that way for anyone but the reality is it is for most.
    The reason being is because all the crappy advice out there. People make it harder than it has to be to lose weight and focus on the wrong things. You can see they are hanging on by a thread. You see them:
    Weigh and measure evrything, get your macros right, where a fit bit, don't eat any sugar or some other restrictive diet. Chances are you will be gaining your weight back and the sad thing is most have a miserable time losing, are miserable trying to maintain and eventually realize that who cares about weighing less if you are miserable and gain it back.
    The trick
    Don't listen to the majority of people. You are smart enough to figure out how to eat and exercise yourself and the only one that really can develop your program. A program you love and can see yourself doing forever. Ask God for help (Mental and spiritual health is more important than physical). Know your HSK Prime. Measure (so yes log but make it super easy)


    I like this

  • Sued0nim
    Sued0nim Posts: 17,456 Member
    Short term dieting leads to short term results unfortunately

    Being goal orientated is fine but somewhere during the time it takes you to get from weight 1 to weight 2 you must switch your mindset to how am I going to live for the rest of my life and develop habits of maintenance

    Motivation can only get you so far, commitment is not steady state and life happens

    after 30 years of yo-yo dieting I finally seem to be stable

    I put it down to the following habits
    1) Anything that isn't CICO is just irrelevant to me eg I can eat anything any time but it has to fit into my overall calories and my macro orientated minimums
    2) continued logging ...some can do without it, I can't...well not yet
    3) regular weight checks
    4) regular exercise
    5) batch cooking and great go to recipes
    6) a kitchen scale ...yes still
    7) knowing that I can go back to bad habits as easily as anyone else
  • valmaebel
    valmaebel Posts: 1,048 Member
    I don't think it's the process of weighing things and counting calories or wearing a fitbit that causes people to hang on by a thread. I wear a fitbit and measure and weigh food and count calories. Yet I'm enjoying my journey.
    It's a mentality of some that are the problem. A big change for me was when I changed my attitude toward food. It's not good or bad, it has no moral value. It is just what it is, food. But the key is to be purposeful. What is the purpose in eating something? If it's to fuel my body, it should be nutrient dense. If it's for pleasure, then it should be high quality. Not restricting myself or prohibiting myself from eating certain foods ever was freeing! I no longer felt a desire to eat high fat or sugar foods, because I knew if I wanted to I certainly could. Sometimes I enjoy a tasty dessert. But it's easier to keep in reasonable quantities because it isn't prohibited. I don't need cheat days where I over indulge and feel sick later.
    I also don't force myself to eat foods just because they are "good". If I like it, I eat it. If I like it and it's high in nutrients, I eat a lot of it. If I don't like it, I don't eat it because that wouldn't be sustainable in the long run. But I try new recipes and new dishes and discover new super foods that I actually enjoy eating.
    Overall it has led to me feeling content with my choices and much less worried if I eat the occasional ice cream or chips.
  • Sued0nim
    Sued0nim Posts: 17,456 Member
    valmaebel wrote: »
    I don't think it's the process of weighing things and counting calories or wearing a fitbit that causes people to hang on by a thread. I wear a fitbit and measure and weigh food and count calories. Yet I'm enjoying my journey.
    It's a mentality of some that are the problem. A big change for me was when I changed my attitude toward food. It's not good or bad, it has no moral value. It is just what it is, food. But the key is to be purposeful. What is the purpose in eating something? If it's to fuel my body, it should be nutrient dense. If it's for pleasure, then it should be high quality. Not restricting myself or prohibiting myself from eating certain foods ever was freeing! I no longer felt a desire to eat high fat or sugar foods, because I knew if I wanted to I certainly could. Sometimes I enjoy a tasty dessert. But it's easier to keep in reasonable quantities because it isn't prohibited. I don't need cheat days where I over indulge and feel sick later.
    I also don't force myself to eat foods just because they are "good". If I like it, I eat it. If I like it and it's high in nutrients, I eat a lot of it. If I don't like it, I don't eat it because that wouldn't be sustainable in the long run. But I try new recipes and new dishes and discover new super foods that I actually enjoy eating.
    Overall it has led to me feeling content with my choices and much less worried if I eat the occasional ice cream or chips.

    Good post
  • vivmom2014
    vivmom2014 Posts: 1,542 Member
    Don't listen to the majority of people. You are smart enough to figure out how to eat and exercise yourself and the only one that really can develop your program.

    I get what you're saying, BUT: I've learned a LOT from listening to sensible veterans here on MFP.

    That said, I do think it's important to have your own compass with regards to eating and exercising. Too much "do this, don't do that" muddles it and can overwhelm.

  • BarneyRubbleMD
    BarneyRubbleMD Posts: 1,092 Member
    e
    valmaebel wrote: »
    I don't think it's the process of weighing things and counting calories or wearing a fitbit that causes people to hang on by a thread. I wear a fitbit and measure and weigh food and count calories. Yet I'm enjoying my journey.
    It's a mentality of some that are the problem. A big change for me was when I changed my attitude toward food. It's not good or bad, it has no moral value. It is just what it is, food. But the key is to be purposeful. What is the purpose in eating something? If it's to fuel my body, it should be nutrient dense. If it's for pleasure, then it should be high quality. Not restricting myself or prohibiting myself from eating certain foods ever was freeing! I no longer felt a desire to eat high fat or sugar foods, because I knew if I wanted to I certainly could. Sometimes I enjoy a tasty dessert. But it's easier to keep in reasonable quantities because it isn't prohibited. I don't need cheat days where I over indulge and feel sick later.
    I also don't force myself to eat foods just because they are "good". If I like it, I eat it. If I like it and it's high in nutrients, I eat a lot of it. If I don't like it, I don't eat it because that wouldn't be sustainable in the long run. But I try new recipes and new dishes and discover new super foods that I actually enjoy eating.
    Overall it has led to me feeling content with my choices and much less worried if I eat the occasional ice cream or chips.

    Excellent post! ...and exactly what I was thinking with every sentence you wrote.
  • SteveMFP123
    SteveMFP123 Posts: 298 Member
    Gaining all the weight back terrifies me, the thing is I still love food and I could easily slip back into old habits.
  • middlehaitch
    middlehaitch Posts: 8,383 Member

    @robbackatya,
    You can disagree, but facts are facts. You don't have to be afraid of the numbers if you have a real solution. Most people gain the weight back is a true statement and that's assuming they lose any significant weight at all.

    Could you please post the research that states these facts, and true statement.

    Cheers, h.
  • keefmac
    keefmac Posts: 313 Member
    Surely you must know you're eating too much and putting weigh on?....
  • PAV8888
    PAV8888 Posts: 10,851 Member
    edited October 2015
    I don't disagree that the vast majority of people who try to lose weight either fail to do so, or regain it.

    I am just confused as to why your TDEE should be called HSK Prime. I mean I could call it the PAV Meridian; but, it would still be my TDEE (more or less accurately calculated depending on how I go about calculating it).

    And the equation will still be CI=CO to maintain by any other name.

    Just saying.
  • Maxematics
    Maxematics Posts: 2,287 Member
    keefmac wrote: »
    Surely you must know you're eating too much and putting weigh on?....

    That's what I'm saying. I always get confused by people who say they gained 50 pounds "out of nowhere" after they lost it all. You don't gain 50 pounds out of nowhere. You can see it, feel it, every time you get dressed you'll be reminded because your clothes won't fit the same way. 10 pounds, maaaaaybe 20, sure, but more than that? Unless the gain was due to a medical reason/from an injury, that's just laziness and negligence.