Genetic analysis

BunnyBomb
BunnyBomb Posts: 143 Member
edited January 2016 in Food and Nutrition
I wanted to ask whether anyone else has ever had a full Genetic screening done and whether it's helped or hindered in their weight loss goal?

I had a full analysis done by 23andme last year and it was very interesting. I learned the basic important things like I don't have the cancer gene (yay), I have a gene that makes me react unusually to certain medicines (a whole list), I have the gene that metabolises caffein really slowly (already knew that), I have the really bad Alzheimer's gene (no surprise there, so does the rest of my fathers family) etc...

But on top of that there were hundreds of other things, including telling me that my genetic structure will respond very well to exercise but not so much to diet. My other half, who had the same test done, had the reverse - it said he responds well to diet, then went on to explain what kind of diet (for him low fat is best, it said low carb doesn't do as well).

I was dubious regarding the accuracy at first, though to be fair the test even told me what colour hair I had, eye colour, height, vision... all from the DNA sample I gave them. I didn't fill in a questionnaire of any kind so there was no other way for them to know. Hell it even told me I'm 0.7% Jewish German and 0.2% Greek! How cool is that!? (Sorry but I loved the genealogy part). So in terms of accuracy, in the end I found it pretty convincing. My doctor was also happy to talk through the medical elements of it all, plus record any useful info on my file, as he said the place I'd used are generally very accurate.

So I wondered if anyone else had done this and whether they'd incorporated the results into their diet, lifestyle, or exercise?

Replies

  • RodaRose
    RodaRose Posts: 9,562 Member
    My doc has discussed 23andMe but the FDA in the US shut it down.
    It came back up in limited form a few months ago.
    I am glad it helped you. :)
  • BunnyBomb
    BunnyBomb Posts: 143 Member
    Yeah I read about that. That's unfortunate. I live in the UK and had no trouble getting it done last year. I wouldn't go as far as saying it has helped me though...not sure really. Some of it was useful to know for sure, but I've not done anything with the data described above on "diet and exercise" so I was curious if there was anyone who had actively changed, or put it into practice.
  • auddii
    auddii Posts: 15,357 Member
    BunnyBomb wrote: »
    Yeah I read about that. That's unfortunate. I live in the UK and had no trouble getting it done last year. I wouldn't go as far as saying it has helped me though...not sure really. Some of it was useful to know for sure, but I've not done anything with the data described above on "diet and exercise" so I was curious if there was anyone who had actively changed, or put it into practice.

    Not unfortunate. FDA shut it down because they could not verify and validate the claims they were making (some of the genes are from very small studies that have not been replicated). So, you got a bunch of information that isn't very accurate. Congrats.
  • I am actually waiting for my results. I didn't go through 23andme and actually my doctor told us the reasons why they were shut down by the FDA (I forget though). It will definitely be interesting when I get my results.
  • cross2bear
    cross2bear Posts: 1,106 Member
    I watched a really good documentary on the genetics of diet and exercise, and it seems from your description that you, who benefits from exercise, are a "responder" while your hubby is a "non-responder". I think thats fascinating stuff as it really runs counter to all the other studies that appear to be absolutely definitive when they say excercise is key. I am familiar with the ads for 23and Me, and have often wondered about it, especially for the genealogy part of it, but havent been motivated enough to do it. I also dont really know if I WANT to know about the not so good stuff, like the AZ gene you mention. Your experience is WAY cool in my opinion!!
  • cross2bear wrote: »
    I watched a really good documentary on the genetics of diet and exercise, and it seems from your description that you, who benefits from exercise, are a "responder" while your hubby is a "non-responder". I think thats fascinating stuff as it really runs counter to all the other studies that appear to be absolutely definitive when they say excercise is key. I am familiar with the ads for 23and Me, and have often wondered about it, especially for the genealogy part of it, but havent been motivated enough to do it. I also dont really know if I WANT to know about the not so good stuff, like the AZ gene you mention. Your experience is WAY cool in my opinion!!

    My doctor mentioned how people will obsess about something that *might* happen some day down the road. I think knowing about something and figuring out how to prevent it is better than NOT knowing and being blindsided later on.
  • spoonyspork
    spoonyspork Posts: 238 Member
    I ran my DNA results through something called 'promethease' (small fee to do it) since the FDA shut down 23andMe's results. Each marker is color coded by how 'rigorous' the studies were, with links to papers and such on said studies. It's interesting at the very least. You could also run it through an 'eye analysis' and it gives you a picture of your most likely eye color, including patterns (was dead-on for me, and exactly the shade and patterns for my husband's, but showed light-greenish-blue instead of light blueish-green).

    Anyway, only thing it said of diet was that I'm more likely to be slim and have an easier time losing if I do gain weight, as I have markers consistent with being easily satisfied by food. It is true - if I'm craving something I'm fine after just a little of what I'm craving. I was already well into my diet by that point so it didn't affect that at all.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,401 Member
    Hate to tell you that when it comes to human physiology and weight loss/gain/maintenance..............with the exception of some health or hormonal issue, we're all on a pretty even scale. Eat a surplus, we gain. Eat a deficit, we lose. Will some have a higher metabolic rate than others? Of course, but that doesn't mean that if someone who has a higher metabolic rate eats more than they need, that weight gain won't occur.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • ninerbuff wrote: »
    Hate to tell you that when it comes to human physiology and weight loss/gain/maintenance..............with the exception of some health or hormonal issue, we're all on a pretty even scale. Eat a surplus, we gain. Eat a deficit, we lose. Will some have a higher metabolic rate than others? Of course, but that doesn't mean that if someone who has a higher metabolic rate eats more than they need, that weight gain won't occur.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    The test isn't just analyzing metabolic rate, how you process certain foods etc. It's measuring your telomeres.
  • brb_2013
    brb_2013 Posts: 1,197 Member
    I never have but I would probably be up for it if the FDA were to approve it. I'd like to know mostly about disease genes, just for prevention and being aware of risks. I had an employer find out her mother had ovarian and breast cancer, with the big bad breast cancer gene. Turns out she didn't get it, but her sister and brother both had it. I'd like to know that sort of thing for sure.
  • BunnyBomb
    BunnyBomb Posts: 143 Member
    edited January 2016
    @Last_mango_in_paradise good luck with your results! I hope you find it as informative and entertaining as I did.

    @cross2bear it is fascinating isn't it?! I'm always amazed at what can be done with science today. I think your right. The explanation section did bang on about being a likely responder to exercise. I get what you mean about not wanting to know though - it's a very personal choice. The guidance in the UK was "get it done, then talk it through with your GP to understand it". I think it was good advice else some folk might freak out about things they don't understand. It was right about the things I knew I possibly had anyway, so there weren't any scary surprises.

    But yes, some of the results are hilarious!! Did you know there is a gene that makes people more likely to sneeze when moving from a totally dark room to a bright one?!? Hahaha.. not sure I fully buy it, but the idea made me laugh like hell. Worth the test just for the entertainment value
  • BunnyBomb
    BunnyBomb Posts: 143 Member
    @spoonyspork wow that sounds really interesting! Thanks for sharing that. I'm like you though and read the section on diet and exercise but haven't really stopped to think about how I could apply it.

    @brb_2013 yeah I agree. I wanted to know about the major disease genes for peace of mind. It didn't tell me anything I didn't already expect, so it was great for that purpose.
  • cross2bear
    cross2bear Posts: 1,106 Member
    edited January 2016
    My doctor mentioned how people will obsess about something that *might* happen some day down the road. I think knowing about something and figuring out how to prevent it is better than NOT knowing and being blindsided later on.


    How peculiar! My doctor didnt mention that.
  • Devol82
    Devol82 Posts: 80 Member
    Some of the dr's I work with use something similar to help find the best meds a person should be taking for depression, hypertension etc so they do not have to "try" this med or that.
  • auddii
    auddii Posts: 15,357 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Hate to tell you that when it comes to human physiology and weight loss/gain/maintenance..............with the exception of some health or hormonal issue, we're all on a pretty even scale. Eat a surplus, we gain. Eat a deficit, we lose. Will some have a higher metabolic rate than others? Of course, but that doesn't mean that if someone who has a higher metabolic rate eats more than they need, that weight gain won't occur.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    The test isn't just analyzing metabolic rate, how you process certain foods etc. It's measuring your telomeres.

    And what amazing information do you now know because you know exactly how many repeats your telomeres contain?
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,401 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Hate to tell you that when it comes to human physiology and weight loss/gain/maintenance..............with the exception of some health or hormonal issue, we're all on a pretty even scale. Eat a surplus, we gain. Eat a deficit, we lose. Will some have a higher metabolic rate than others? Of course, but that doesn't mean that if someone who has a higher metabolic rate eats more than they need, that weight gain won't occur.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    The test isn't just analyzing metabolic rate, how you process certain foods etc. It's measuring your telomeres.
    Which you don't have control of. I get it. But ONE does have control of how much one eats and burns. People are now trying to major in the minors when it comes to weight loss.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • auddii wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Hate to tell you that when it comes to human physiology and weight loss/gain/maintenance..............with the exception of some health or hormonal issue, we're all on a pretty even scale. Eat a surplus, we gain. Eat a deficit, we lose. Will some have a higher metabolic rate than others? Of course, but that doesn't mean that if someone who has a higher metabolic rate eats more than they need, that weight gain won't occur.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    The test isn't just analyzing metabolic rate, how you process certain foods etc. It's measuring your telomeres.

    And what amazing information do you now know because you know exactly how many repeats your telomeres contain?

    Nothing yet because I haven't received my report.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,401 Member
    If it's to look at RISK based on genetic markers...........okay useful. For weight loss..............not so much.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • BunnyBomb
    BunnyBomb Posts: 143 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    If it's to look at RISK based on genetic markers...........okay useful. For weight loss..............not so much.

    Yes I don't think there would be any point in anyone thinking a genetic analysis contains the secret keys to weight loss haha. For me the diet & exercise section was more...side information? It certainly wasn't something I expected to be included.
  • juggernaut1974
    juggernaut1974 Posts: 6,212 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Hate to tell you that when it comes to human physiology and weight loss/gain/maintenance..............with the exception of some health or hormonal issue, we're all on a pretty even scale. Eat a surplus, we gain. Eat a deficit, we lose. Will some have a higher metabolic rate than others? Of course, but that doesn't mean that if someone who has a higher metabolic rate eats more than they need, that weight gain won't occur.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    The test isn't just analyzing metabolic rate, how you process certain foods etc. It's measuring your telomeres.

    If it could measure my midi-chlorians, then you might have me hooked.

    #IWannaBeAJedi